The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » I'm a real boy! » » Figure Table (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3~4~5~6~7 [Next]
Howie Diddot
View Profile
Inner circle
San Francisco & Los Angeles California
3278 Posts

Profile of Howie Diddot
Quote:
On 2011-02-01 03:55, Ony Carcamo wrote:

Over the years I've tried almost all mic types and ended up using a handheld mic (preferably wired) on a mic stand.

Better to try each one first in your performance, see what fits you best, and you'll make a better choice later.


Ony,

Thanks for adding your comment to the topic, it is really appreciated; I am thinking this segment of the thread will end as the figure table segment did, by me owning more than one type of mic.

I think your wired mic idea is perfect and one came with the P.A. system I purchased; I was going to remove it from the system, now I am going to try using it and see if the wire gets in my way; I want to try a wireless to experience it. Reading your post,

I will always make sure I have it with me; it is great as a backup if all else fails.
Howie Diddot
View Profile
Inner circle
San Francisco & Los Angeles California
3278 Posts

Profile of Howie Diddot
Quote:
On 2011-02-01 07:57, CaptKirk wrote:
cymbals stands can be found pretty cheap on local Craig's Lists and on Ebay.



CaptKirk; welcome to the thread,

you are probably correct, “cymbals stands can be found pretty cheap on local Craig's Lists and on Ebay” except now that I want one, in the time frame I was looking, nothing that fit my needs was advertised on eBay, or craig’s List.
Dickens & Dave
View Profile
Inner circle
North Central Florida
1813 Posts

Profile of Dickens & Dave
I was just going through some of my bookmarks in my browser (it's amazing how they build up), and I found that some of the pages from my old website are still coming up, including the page about the dummy wireless mic;

http://whiggins.stormpages.com/lapelmic.htm
http://dickensndave.bravehost.com/index.html



"Oh that I had wings like a dove! for then would I fly away, and be at rest."
Howie Diddot
View Profile
Inner circle
San Francisco & Los Angeles California
3278 Posts

Profile of Howie Diddot
Quote:
On 2011-02-01 10:50, blueshawk1 wrote:
the dummy wireless mic;

http://whiggins.stormpages.com/lapelmic.htm


Thanks it’s a great idea, I will even buy the parts and build it.

I will post a photo of Dan wearing it when it’s finished
Dickens & Dave
View Profile
Inner circle
North Central Florida
1813 Posts

Profile of Dickens & Dave
Good! I'm glad to see it get used, that's the whole reason I put it up there.

I just found another page I forgot about. Way back when, I did a survey about people using stands, etc., it's old, but thought it might still have some pertinence in this thread;
http://dickensndave.bravehost.com/stand.html
http://dickensndave.bravehost.com/index.html



"Oh that I had wings like a dove! for then would I fly away, and be at rest."
Mr. Pitts
View Profile
Inner circle
David Pitts
1054 Posts

Profile of Mr. Pitts
I used to use a headset mic, the one that came with the Florida Magic PA I used for a few years. When that PA broke, I decided to use a standard, hand held, wired mic on a stand. I decided to do this for a variety of reasons.

On more than one occasion, I had found myself at a venue that was too big for my little PA, but there was a DJ there, willing to let me use his awesome system. Only problem was, all he had was a traditional mic, and I wasn't used to using one. I'd try to patch my system through his, or just try to make my small system work, or I'd struggle with the mic he provided. In all these scenarios my act didn't look as good as I know it is. Referrals and repeat bookings are so important, the act really needs to look it's best every time onstage. In comedy, timing is SO important, and awkwardness with the equipment just ruins the timing. This is the main reason I chose the standard mic on a stand, I just wanted to be comfortable with the set up I most typically find at big events.

The second reason is comedy clubs. You never bring your own sound to a comedy club, certainly not an open mic. You use what they have and mic technique is considered comedy 101. If you want to look competent and confident, be able to use a mic. They'll be against you at a comedy club anyway because you're a ventriloquist so you really have to be better than the other comics at every level.

The third thing is that there are funny things you can do with a mic, emphasize certain things, do sound effects, it becomes an addition to the act.

If you ask an audience volunteer a question and you don't have a mic to hold in front of them, the audience won't hear their response. The audience wants to hear their response and you want it to be heard. Kids really like talking into the mic.

The mic with a stand is 'old school', and I like 'old school'

Finally, when a person steps up to a microphone, people seem to pay attention immediately.

It was hard getting used to a traditional wired mic, but I forced myself to do it and now I'm comfortable with one. On the surface, it seems like a small thing, but these details are important. Details are what make the pros look like pros.
David Pitts
The Astonishing Mr. Pitts
Comedy Magician and Ventriloquist
http://www.mrpitts.com
Howie Diddot
View Profile
Inner circle
San Francisco & Los Angeles California
3278 Posts

Profile of Howie Diddot
Mr. Pitts;
This was an excellent post well written so I can understand the main points and I have learned much from reading what you wrote; it was very informative.

While I’m learning and perfecting my routine, do you think it is possible to get used to using a wireless microphone while using my small P.A. system with no audience members coming to speak and a wired microphone for venues that have sound systems supplied?

or should stick to one method
Mr. Pitts
View Profile
Inner circle
David Pitts
1054 Posts

Profile of Mr. Pitts
The main difference is between a headset or lapel mic and a hand-held mic. Wireless or wired doesn't make a lot of difference in how you use it. As you develop and rehearse your act, you'll want to walk through it, figuring out where you'll be standing, where you'll move for this prop or that, the transitions etc.. As you do this, you'll be figuring out how far each move will be. You'll probably figure out that you do most of your act in one spot. So if you do find yourself at a venue where the mic is wired, it probably won't present that much of a problem. The difficulty for me was the transition from headset to hand held or on a mic stand. With a headset you don't have to be aware of the mic very much, and having to then do the act with a regular mic, if you're not used to it, you'll find you have to think about it way too much. That's the goal, to get so used to using a traditional mic (wired or not) that you no longer have to think about it. So I'd say use the wireless hand held or on a stand, and unless you're running around the stage like Madonna, you'll be able to adapt fairly easily to a wired mic.
David Pitts
The Astonishing Mr. Pitts
Comedy Magician and Ventriloquist
http://www.mrpitts.com
Howie Diddot
View Profile
Inner circle
San Francisco & Los Angeles California
3278 Posts

Profile of Howie Diddot
OK if I am reading you correctly, I should use a stand and the microphone can be wireless, or wired, as long as it’s on a stand?

Wireless for me is the point, this way I can’t wrap it around myself and will not trip on it.

I can adapt to this very easily
CaptKirk
View Profile
Loyal user
263 Posts

Profile of CaptKirk
I'd say go with the wireless on a stand if you can. Most clubs still use the conventional "wired on a stand" mike setup since that's what they've had and been using for years. With a wireless on a stand, a performer can easily take the mic out and move freely about the stage or audience without having to deal with a long cord dangling from the mike and possibly tripping him or her up. IF I were doing a gig that required my walking around with my figure on stage or into the audience, then I'd certainly want a wireless headset or lapel mic since holding/supporting my figure with one hand and working his/her controls with the other doesn't leave many hands left to hold a mic, wireless or wired, unless you happen to be from Mars like that guy on that episode of "The Twilight Zone":o) IMHO:o)
Howie Diddot
View Profile
Inner circle
San Francisco & Los Angeles California
3278 Posts

Profile of Howie Diddot
CaptKirk;

I can and I will use a wireless stand mic; I think I am going to wind up with a wireless lapel mic, a face wand mic and a standard, on the stand type of wireless mic; I already have a wired mic that came with the P.A. system I purchased.

I am learning that unlike a Vent Stand the mic is a personal preference and I don’t have the experience to discern the difference.

What is fascinating here is the diverse problems that occur using different types of equipment; and of course Dan will have his own wireless mic thanks to blueshawk1’s great idea; he was kind enough to look up the schematic and post it here.
Servante
View Profile
Inner circle
1328 Posts

Profile of Servante
I've used 'em all. Do some TV as well. On TV, if I'm on solo, a wireless lapel mic takes the worry out of things. However, if it's an event broadcast, I use a handheld, simply because that makes it all more showbizzy. For years the handhelds have been wired, but you learn the choreography of dealing with a wire. The last couple of years, the station has had wireless handhelds, which makes it all a lot easier.
If, however, you need to juggle a figure or a clipboard or anything else, the handheld makes it a little more difficult. It's fine on a stand, but it limits your resources if you have to take it off the stand. If you're not planning on moving around or using props, handheld with stand is fine. If you ARE handling props and moving (and you've said you want to do some magic), wireless lapel mics take a lot of the difficulty out of things.

-Philip
Steve at The Dummy Shoppe
View Profile
Elite user
479 Posts

Profile of Steve at The Dummy Shoppe
Almost more important than the issue of wireless/wired is the issue of the shape of the mike relative to the location of your mouth. Poor placement there can drive the back half of your audience insane trying to understand you. Dan Horn did a wonderful seminar last year at the ConVENTion on Mike placement. He showed some examples of wrong vs. right and it was staggering in the difference of the sound.

Steve
http://www.thedummyshoppe.com
ColinDymond
View Profile
Special user
Gloucestershire, England
675 Posts

Profile of ColinDymond
David. Good point! I've been using a wireless head set for year. I wouldn't use a lappel one live, they are too prone to feed back!
I've just started working comedy clubs and cararet spot where you have a mic on a stand, it's a whole new learning curve. I'm getting there but...
Howie Diddot
View Profile
Inner circle
San Francisco & Los Angeles California
3278 Posts

Profile of Howie Diddot
Quote:
On 2011-02-02 18:47, ColinDymond wrote:
I've been using a wireless head set for year. I wouldn't use a lappel one live, they are too prone to feed back!



Would anyone know why a lapel microphone would give feedback and a headset, or a microphone on a stand will not?
Servante
View Profile
Inner circle
1328 Posts

Profile of Servante
I've never had feedback problems. Lapel mics are supposed to be directional toward the wearer. I'm gonna guess that feedback trouble could result from:
(A) A relatively inexpensive lapel mic (No offense, Colin).
(B) Getting out in front of the speakers with a relatively inexpensive lapel mic.

-Philip
Servante
View Profile
Inner circle
1328 Posts

Profile of Servante
Also, under certain conditions,
(C) Getting out in front of the speakers with a relatively expensive lapel mic. with the gain jacked up.
tacrowl
View Profile
Inner circle
Maryland
1633 Posts

Profile of tacrowl
The lapel mic is further from your mouth, so it has a wider pick up field. (Can't think of the technical term right now.) A headset or handheld are more directional and closer to the mouth. Basically what happens, the mic will pic up its own amplified signal and create a feedback loop. Handhelds and headsets will do this too if you position them wrong or cross in front of the speakers.
Tom Crowl - Comedy Ventriloquist

ComedyVentriloquist.com

Learn-Ventriloquism.com

Image
Howie Diddot
View Profile
Inner circle
San Francisco & Los Angeles California
3278 Posts

Profile of Howie Diddot
So I should, or should not purchase a relatively expensive lapel mic with a high gain adjustment, or I must not get out in front of the speakers with a relatively inexpensive lapel mic, or do not place the lapel mic far from my mouth… ok I got it now….

Adding a little joke…

So I think by the comments, a quality lapel microphone with speakers well placed, pointing away from the performer, near the mouth with the volume correctly adjusted is a good choice for some venues
ColinDymond
View Profile
Special user
Gloucestershire, England
675 Posts

Profile of ColinDymond
Because the lappel mic is further from your mouth you have to have the system turned up more so more risk of feedback. It does depend on lots of other factors but generally you don't use lappels for live work.
I can move my head set mic to change the volume if I need to.
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » I'm a real boy! » » Figure Table (0 Likes)
 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3~4~5~6~7 [Next]
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2019 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.25 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL