We Remember The Magic Café We Remember
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workshop » » Bending copper tubing??? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Dr. Solar
View Profile
Special user
Citrus Heights, Ca.
526 Posts

Profile of Dr. Solar
I'm trying to bend some old 3/8" copper tubing into a coil kind of like a still. About a two to two and a half inch diameter coiled like a spring with about three or four turns with an overall height of six to seven inches. I got a fuel line bending device at an auto parts store but it allows the tubing to flatten out and kink. I know they used to sell bending "springs" to help hold the tubing round. Do you think if I add sand to the tube and cap both ends it might help? Any other suggestions?

Thanks,
Doc
"look for me in all things forgotten"
www.drsolar.com
Dr. Solar
View Profile
Special user
Citrus Heights, Ca.
526 Posts

Profile of Dr. Solar
Okay, maybe this type item will do,

http://cgi.ebay.com/1-4-5-16-3-8-Tubing-......0efcb03b

seems to take all sizes, just hope it will allow the spring type shaping. Any ideas about the sand?
"look for me in all things forgotten"
www.drsolar.com
remote guy
View Profile
Special user
Maryland
539 Posts

Profile of remote guy
This bender may work a little better.

http://cgi.ebay.com/CT364A06-05-04-Tubin......985a116d

Be sure to use refrigeration tubing. There is a big difference between refrigeration tubing and plumbing tubing (water). Refrigeration tubing is more flexible. One other thing you should be aware of is copper tubing becomes harder to work with as you bend it.

One other option is this Aluminum tubing which is packaged coiled.

http://cgi.ebay.com/MA-LINE-3-8-ALUMINUM......a8e61d09

Hope this helps.
Nick
thegreatnippulini
View Profile
Inner circle
of Hell because I've made
2589 Posts

Profile of thegreatnippulini
Tube packing can help, but you need to ram the sand in as tight as possible, then solder the ends with caps. Then you can handle the material as if it is solid stock. As long as you're doing things cold it should be no problem. Heat forming and forging calls for VERY dry sand as expanding moisture will rupture the thin wall.
The Great Nippulini: body piercer, Guinness World Record holder, blacksmith and man with The World's Strongest Nipples! Does the WORLD care? We shall see...
http://www.greatnippulini.com
Stanyon
View Profile
Inner circle
Landrum, S.C. by way of Chicago
3405 Posts

Profile of Stanyon
Call a refrigeration, heating/cooling contractor, and see if they have any discards. Or try http://www.coppertubecoils.com and see if they can help.

Just a thought!
Stanyon

aka Steve Taylor

"Every move a move!"

"If you've enjoyed my performance half as much as I've enjoyed performing for you, then you've enjoyed it twice as much as me!"
MagicB1S
View Profile
Inner circle
Knoxville Tenn.
1039 Posts

Profile of MagicB1S
If you take the copper tubing and fill it with dish soap and then freeze it you can bend it without it buckling. You need a cold freezer to make the liquid freeze.(around zero) the liquid soap will not crack when bending that is why you use that instead of water. Once everything is bent just let the soap thaw out and run out of the tubing.
"There are Tricks To All Trades.... My Trade is all Tricks"

"An amature practices until he gets it right. A Professional Practices until he can't get it wrong"

www.Themagicchest.webs.com
bobswislosky@yahoo.com
Dr. Solar
View Profile
Special user
Citrus Heights, Ca.
526 Posts

Profile of Dr. Solar
All great information and informative. I picked up a bender at Harbor Freight today and will try it tomorrow. Too rainy to go out into the way too small shop. I like the soap idea.

Thanks to all,

Doc
"look for me in all things forgotten"
www.drsolar.com
Michael Baker
View Profile
Eternal Order
Near a river in the Midwest
11161 Posts

Profile of Michael Baker
Just curious, but how did the guys who made stills do it? It would seem that there were some fairly backwoods corners of civilization that somehow managed to figure this out, with minimal resources.
~michael baker
The Magic Company
remote guy
View Profile
Special user
Maryland
539 Posts

Profile of remote guy
Quote:
On 2011-03-19 01:02, Michael Baker wrote:
Just curious, but how did the guys who made stills do it? It would seem that there were some fairly backwoods corners of civilization that somehow managed to figure this out, with minimal resources.


The problem is he wants the coils about 2" - 2 1/2" in diameter. I have never seen a real still other than pictures and TV but the coils appear to be much larger in diameter.

Nick
Michael Baker
View Profile
Eternal Order
Near a river in the Midwest
11161 Posts

Profile of Michael Baker
Oops! I overlooked that in the OP.
~michael baker
The Magic Company
joe yang
View Profile
Loyal user
Florida
296 Posts

Profile of joe yang
Mike, I think the copper tubing used in stills did and still does come coiled. Not that I would know for sure.
aka Mike Booth
thegreatnippulini
View Profile
Inner circle
of Hell because I've made
2589 Posts

Profile of thegreatnippulini
Quote:
On 2011-03-19 01:02, Michael Baker wrote:
Just curious, but how did the guys who made stills do it? It would seem that there were some fairly backwoods corners of civilization that somehow managed to figure this out, with minimal resources.


You'd be surprised how resourceful people can get with minimal (or no) tools. I've seen power hammers made entirely of junk yard materials that work just as well as a 25 pound Little Giant.
The Great Nippulini: body piercer, Guinness World Record holder, blacksmith and man with The World's Strongest Nipples! Does the WORLD care? We shall see...
http://www.greatnippulini.com
Michael Baker
View Profile
Eternal Order
Near a river in the Midwest
11161 Posts

Profile of Michael Baker
Well, I've seen a BBQ grill made from a shopping cart so I guess the world has no shortage on cretivity and resourcefulness! Smile
~michael baker
The Magic Company
en2oh
View Profile
Loyal user
215 Posts

Profile of en2oh
Quote:
On 2011-03-20 14:37, Michael Baker wrote:
Well, I've seen a BBQ grill made from a shopping cart so I guess the world has no shortage on cretivity and resourcefulness! Smile


One other thing you can do is use "fusible metal". Low melting point alloy will fill up the tube with no trouble. Typical melting point for inexpensive material is about 140F - 180F. Once the tubing is coiled, put the coils into hot water and the metal will melt leaving you with a perfectly formed coil.

This is commonly used in the music industry in the manufacture of horned instruments. As well, if you are interested, you can order very low temperature fusible metal on eBay and do the CSI illusion. Ebay is a very interesting resource for our line of interest.

Doug
Dr. Solar
View Profile
Special user
Citrus Heights, Ca.
526 Posts

Profile of Dr. Solar
Sounds Doug since this first post I have had to seek out a musical horn worker but managed to make due with some assorted brass and copper findings.

Doc
"look for me in all things forgotten"
www.drsolar.com
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workshop » » Bending copper tubing??? (0 Likes)
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2020 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.22 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL