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Potty the Pirate
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I think a discussion about how to deal with disruptive behaviour would be helpful (though it's been talked about many times before here). I hope my comments above can give some ideas to start off with. Personally, the only disruptive behaviour I see is from parents. Now they can disrupt a show if they talk noisily at the back of the hall or room.
knick23
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Anyone who has been fortunate enough, as I have, to see a lot of live performance, be it stand-up or even theatre will have seen even the very best, on occasion, fail. Persistent hecklers, ‘drying’, tech difficulties, at some point problems can become insurmountable, even for those at the top of their game. Now, if what many here are claiming is actually true, then maybe these guys should come to this forum to learn from the real pros…or maybe they should just throw in the towel and quit.

John’s original thread relates to the wisdom of putting a behaviour note on one’s website (in this case tucked away in a FAQ page), my response sought to justify why I had (due to my particular client group I have had a lot of negative disruption from children and young adults outside of my target audience i.e. kids/teenagers actively disrupting the show – persistent and exceptionally negative disruption). You’re making naïve, self aggrandising assumptions when you suggest that I, or others in the same situation, do not already have the skills to deal with the disruptions that we all know are extremely commonplace in this field.

But before you wade in – In the original post it has been accepted that I want to make a note about disruptive behaviour, the question is where this note should be made, not should I have one. Nobody actually asked for advice about controlling behaviour. This can debated elsewhere with people who need/want to. Instead, the usual suspects are using this thread to puff and blow about how professional they are, how great a performer they are etc etc. It’s beginning to sound like an inferiority complex. Gentlemen, just because some entertainers working in a different field may see children’s entertainment or magic as a ‘low’ form of entertainment does not mean you have to take every opportunity to justify yourself – Get over it, surely here we are in good company?

Anyway, to clarify my position: I think that it is necessary to make a point about behaviour at some point, due to my particular situation/client group and…[gulp]…I am not perfect… there, I’ve said it, and it heartens me because if nothing else it puts me up there with the best.
Potty the Pirate
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Knick, stand-up comedy is one thing. But to suggest that in theatre even the very best occasionally fail is a strange comment. A professional knows that "the show must go on". Sure, there are probably some elite performers who have "failed" on occasion. But the vast majority of truly great performers give flawless performances every time, for decades. That's why they're at the top of their game. As it's a very subjective thing, many will beat ourselves up over small things which they know could have been better - but it's a very different thing to "failing" as a performer.
But I thought this thread was about "disruptive behaviour", not about a performer "failing". Surely that's two different things? It seems to me that the first implies audience management, whilst the latter implies poor performance.
If you search the archives here, you'll find threads about how to handle older kids who interrupt shows and cause a nuisance. Frank has offered great advice in the past. If you feel it's appropriate to include the clause about disruptive behaviour in your contracts, go right ahead. I've stated my opinions, and you're welcome to make your own mind up. I don't understand why folks are apparently upset because they learn that some performers never make any reference to this, nor really have a problem with it. Actually, the vast majority of professional performers these days almost never witness anything close to disruptive behaviour.
magic4u02
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Interesting topic and good discussion here so far. One thing we have to realize is that we each have an opinion and are entitled to it. Let's not allow frustration and differences of opinion to stop us from learning from each other.

With that said, I do think there are 2 sides of the "disruptive behavior" scenario and whether or not you state it on a website or marketing materials.

1) disruptive children in the audience causing issues or problems during the show
2) children or adults or situations outside of the performance area itself that cause issues or distracts from the enjoyment of the folks watching the show

Each of these we all have experienced but both are vastly different in my mind in how I personally would handle them. The question is not so much how you handle disruptive behavior, but more on if you should have it on your materials or website to try and prevent problems before the event takes place.

I commend anyone for being proactive and trying to solve problems before they become bigger ones. If you are a professional, your job is to be a solutions provider to the client and do what you can to both meet and exceed expectations. Controlling disruptive situations can help you to have a better experience.

Now a disruptive audience has never really been so much of a problem for me. In my mind it comes with the territory. If I am a professional, I should be able to handle situation like this and be able to turn it into around in my favor. When an audience is watching me, they are in my world and they are a part of my show. my show is not just my props and myself. My show also consists of the audience watching em and it is up to me to be able to control any situation that comes up.

As others have stated, I get the kids and the audience excited. I want them to engage with me and interact in all different ways. So one of the only things I may state on the phone on in a letter to the client is simply something like this.

"The Magical Illusions of Kyle and Kelly Magic Show is a fun show that engages children and adults in a very interactive style. We encourage our audiences to take part in the show from their seats as well as become part of the show by being invited on stage. Fun, laughter and lots of applause are always more then encouraged."

Now in this fashion it is worded as a a feature and a benefit. in other words the feature is an interactive an engaging show. The benefit is that the audience gets to have more fun and a more entertaining experience. It is also worded in such a way that it does not come across as a negative to the prospect. Instead they see it as a powerful benefit that sells to them. It also allows the prospect to realize that if the kids jump up or shout, that it is ok and a part of the style my show tries to invite.

The second situation is one in which their our outside distractions that prohibit the audience from engaging and enjoying in the show experience. These are the distractions that bother me the most and most of this can be solved by being open and up front with the client.

A lot of times clients are simply not used to working with entertainers and so I take on a roll of trying to educate the client by being a help to them to solve their needs. For example, I will always engage a prospect by saying...

"Hi Mary. May I ask you first if you can tell me a bit more about your event and what your goals are for it? What would you like your guests to come away with after the event is over?"

by doing this I am engaging them right from the start and do not have to write anything into any contract unless we agree upon something that the CLIENT brought up themselves. Most entertainers sell, sell, sell. I like to get them talking and find out through listening, what their needs are. in this way it allows me to talk about things that can be of benefit to them. In this fashion I do not come off as demanding.

For example I might hear them state, "oh we want the children to have a great time so the adults can meet and greet and get to know each other more."

Now that I know this information I can offer a solution for them that also helps me out in the long run. I can state..

"That sounds wonderful. My show is a family show and we encourage kids to sit with their mom or dad and moms and dads to sit with their kids. This way the show can be experienced as a family. Since many of the adults have not seen each other in a long time, I can understand people wanting to catch up on old times. To make this work best for both the show and for you, I would recommend having the show in a different area from where the meet and greet will be taking place. This way the audience can hear me and interact better during my show."

Now once again, I engaged her first to have her tell me her needs and wishes before just throwing out demands towards her. My response is worded in a way that she sees as a benefit to her event and how I am making it a better situation for her. Once agreed upon, then this can be worded and mentioned in the contract agreement that goes out to her. I do not place it in there unless it was discussed ahead of time.

As you can see, my approach is one of engaging the prospect/client up front by getting them to talk to me. When they do, I listen to what they are saying and I latch on to those areas I know I can directly help with. This approach gets them to see me as a true professional who is willing to help them make their event the best it can be by offering solutions to them that really work. My perceived value climbs much higher before I ever show up at the event.

Once a subject is discussed, it gets written down and then I can include that in a contract or via an email conformation letter. When they see it, they are not alarmed at it because they know we have discussed it before in advance. It is no longer a demand but an agreement we have to ensure their event goes over the best it can.

Hope this helps.

Kyle
Kyle Peron

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magic4u02
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The bottom line is "to each hs own". What works for one may not work for the other. Only YOU can decide what works best for you as a performer. if you are not sure, test it out and see what happens. run a test:

1) take a month or two and write a clause on your contract and see if you see a difference at your shows or in what clients say to you.

2) do not mention a clause at all but instead talk with the client and control the situation at the show when it comes up.

Then you can find out for yourself if it is working or not. If you are worried about something like this effecting the amount of shows you book, then that's simple to. Track it all. If you are a professional, you should track everything so that you know what your repsonse rate or ROI is. I can also track the amount of people going to my site or even filling out the form through the usage of Google analytics.

So test it yourself and find out what works for you.

Kyle
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Potty the Pirate
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Kyle makes some good points. I had a lengthy chat this afternoon with a mom who has booked me for a naming ceremony. she anticipates that the kids (all ages from toddlers to teens) will want to watch the show....but the adults will largely want to chat among themselves. In the same smallish hall.
I then offered various solutions:
Allow enough time for chatting before the show, then encourage everyone to watch and enjoy the show.
Or, encourage the chatty adults to do so outside, if weather permits.
Or, try to have the adults chat wuietly at the back of the room, so that I'm able to incorporate vocal dynamics, including whispering, into the show, without issue.
Or if neccessary, I'll just boost up the amplifier and the room will be very noisy, but the kids will hear me OK.
I did explain that this final solution isn't the best, as there will be a number of younger kids who are likely to find so much noise very distracting.
The point is that we've anticipated this "disruption", and discussed the various ways to deal with it. I've also assured the mom that I'm experienced enough to be sure that things will go as smoothly as they possibly can.
I'll also do my best on the day to engage the adults sufficiently that they will stop their talking, and start to watch the show! Of course, this can never be guaranteed, especially when there are many family members who will have travelled some distance, and who rarely get to meet each other. Weddings are another typical event when this happens.
Watch experienced performers deal with interruptions or gaffes during their show. Handled with humour and panache, these are often the moments folks remember as highlights rather than "disruptions".
Ken Northridge
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I agree that a disruptive children clause of any kind will only be seen as a negative. I try to have as few ‘rules’ as possible, trying to project an ‘easy to work with’ image.

Furthermore, when I do have disruptive children, and when all of my techniques do not work, the adults know the problem is the child, not me. In fact, they will apologize for the child. The key is keeping your cool no matter what happens. Its strange but when I have an out of control show I always get many requests for business cards and work from them. Why? I think its because they think, “Wow, if he can handle that crowd without losing his cool, he can even handle my kids!”

In other words this is why a disruptive children clause is not necessary. Parents know all to well how disruptive children can get. No need state the obvious.
"Love is the real magic." -Doug Henning
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magic4u02
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Potty:
Exactly my friend. =) by simply asking the cleitn up front and listening to their needs for the event, you were 1) able to realize there may be an issue and 2) offer a solution that you mutually agree to in advance. This then can be placed on a contract etc. because you both discussed it ahead of time.

Ken:
Just remember it is not always the children that are disruptive. Sometimes it can be the adults or the children or older children at the event that are not part of the audience. This is why I always talk with the client ahead of the event to discuss their needs for the day. get them talking and I can usually get a good feel for the situation. =)

Kyle
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Potty the Pirate
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Negative clauses in your contract aren't helpful. I don't even have a "contract" as such, because I prefer to keep things as friendly as possible.
As long as we're talking children's parties, I would suggest that it's neither in the performer's interest nor the client's to have formal contracts. To date, I have NEVER had problems that couldn't be sorted out amicably in the long run. Rather than worrying about contracts, I ensure I have PLI and CRB check for my clients' peace of mind.
All these issues have been discussed on previous threads. Sometimes I think it would be more beneficial if folks looked up their questions in the archives (which are HUGE).
Those of us who know we're just repeating advice already given are likely to give up and let the thread go off onto a tangent, instead of focussing on what is clearly the real issue. Not where to include clauses about "disruptive behaviour" in your contract, but why you should feel such a clause is neccessary, and even why you should feel a contract (for a Birthday Party) is neccessary?
Donald Dunphy
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Hi John -

I use a basic one page FAQs page for birthday shows, in addition to a confirmation letter.

For non-birthday shows, I have a four page FAQs page, in addition to a contract. (I even mail them seperately.)

I don't give the same weight to my FAQs page as I do the contract. However, some customers do. And that's fine.

On my birthdays FAQs, I haven't really covered the issue of problem children, because it doesn't seem to happen as often (smaller groups of kids... usually less than 15... in a home... along with the kids, parents want to watch the show).

However, on my non-birthdays FAQs page, I cover the issue of problem children, in addition to other topics like staging, lighting, PA system, audience seating, how I'm to be promoted, changing rooms, set-up time / strike down time, etc.

I have a background of working in childcare as well as performing, so I handle most situations with problem kids fairly well. However, sometimes there are problem children at a show / party / event, and it's not my job to be "the heavy" if they can't take a subtle hint. There are teachers / childcare workers / parents / event organizers that sometimes need to be reminded of their role.

I wouldn't put the topic of disruptive behavior in the contract or confirmation letter itself, and I generally don't feel the need to discuss it in advance of the show. But I have put it in the FAQs page (which I mail in advance), as one of the topics covered. Like I said, I don't discuss everything on my FAQs page. It communicates enough without me being redundant.

- Donald
Donald Dunphy is a Victoria Magician, British Columbia, Canada.
Donald Dunphy
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Hi John -

For birthdays, I also provide a party tips booklet. That is a different item than my birthday confirmation letter and my birthday FAQs page.

- Donald
Donald Dunphy is a Victoria Magician, British Columbia, Canada.
John Breeds
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Hi Donald

I had to retire from active performing two years ago due to poor health (problem with lower back). But for the record, whenever I accepted a booking I acknowledged it with a Confirmation Letter, which included date and time, etc. And depending on the occasion and past experience I sometimes also asked that no loose balloons be scattered about the hall floor.

Accompanying my Confirmation Letter was a Standard Contract that the Mom had to sign and return. The Standard Contract included some very simple points about the fee, when to pay, the time and venue. All trouble-free stuff. I did NOT mention anything about not being left alone with children or behaviour clauses. It just kept the whole thing simple and stress-free.

But I do know that many, many entertainers also add a pre-printed list of “Helpful Hints for a Successful Party”. I think Louie included something similar to this on his website. He also added the behaviour guide clause to his Helpful Hints list. And that was at the heart of my interest.

I merely thought this would form the basis for a lively debate about where such ‘Helpful Hints’ be brought to the booker’s attention. That’s all! It was such a shame that one person chose to make a personal attack me.

John
TheAmbitiousCard
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Quote:
On 2011-03-24 06:20, magicgeorge wrote:
I am better than everyone on this thread because I have dealt with every disruptive child and volatile situation perfectly.

I also crap rainbows and turn up to my shows on a unicorn.


I gotta see this act!!!!
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Red Shadow
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In the confirmation sheet I send out to the client after the booking is made, there is a terms and conditions attached. For the sake of healthy discussion, here is that page:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

General Terms and Conditions

The following should all be common sense and you probably won’t have to worry about them with your booking, but occasionally a few outlines need to be made to ensure you receive a successful show and the children have a great time.

1. Distractions: - Please keep all distractions away from the children. He cannot perform a show if the children’s attention is divided between him and toys, pets or bouncy castles. Please do not serve any food or drink during the show as that is a distraction which will cause the show to end prematurely. Stephen can happily keep the children entertained throughout his time-slot, but not if the children are distracted by something else going on in the room.

2. Adults Supervision: - Stephen is not engaged in a supervisory role, and should not be left unattended with the children. He is not a mobile crèche facility and by law there should be one adult for every five children present at your event. All Stephen requires is that at least one responsible adult is present in the room at all times during the entertainment to help the children in whatever they need. This can include helping children go to the toilet, stopping children who are being aggressive with each other and for removing any badly behaved children from the show should it be necessary.

3. Working Outside: - Stephen is happy to work outside, such as in the garden or on a field as long as it is dry. However it must be noted that children are easily distracted and if you have garden toys out at the same time, or other activities such as toys, pets, a sweet-table, food, a play-house, playground, football game, trampoline or bouncy castle, he will not be able to perform his full show. It only takes one child to start playing with these other activities and want other children to play with which will cause a domino effect. If you decide to have other activities / distractions during his show, he is not responsible for its duration and the full fee is still payable.

4. Cancellations: - You are free to cancel / rearrange any show with Stephen prior to 14 days of the performance date. However cancellations of Stephen’s services within 14 days of the performance date with result in a 50% cancellation fee. Cancellations on the actual day of the performance will result in the full fee being paid to Stephen. In the event of Stephen being unable to fulfil the booking, due to illness, accident, vehicle breakdown or other circumstances beyond control. Every effort will be made to notify the client in good time and every attempt will be made to find a replacement entertainer, although this is not guaranteed. Every effort will be made to attend your booking, but he is still human and should any of the above happen, no further liabilities will be accepted by, or charged to Amazing Stephen.

5. Parking: - It is the client’s responsibility to ensure there is adequate parking close to the venue entrance for Stephen, he has large equipment to load / unload. Any parking fees involved are not included in his fee and are additional to what is stated above. If Stephen cannot do the performance due to lack of parking, the client shall still be liable for the Full Performance Fee (Unloading / loading then parking elsewhere is not an option.)

6. Performance Times: - It is the client’s responsibility to ensure that the children are present and on time so the show can start at the booked time. Stephen often has up to four shows in a day and will need to leave at the scheduled ending time. In the event of a late start, Stephen reserves the right to shorten the show so he finishes on time to get to his next venue. In the event of this happening the full performance fee will still be payable.

7. Safety: - Stephen will not perform in any area that is deemed unsafe. This could be outside in heavy winds, rain or snow, or near a construction site. He will also be unable to work in basements or lofts due to the heavy equipment he uses and potential damage it could cause getting it to the performance area. In such cases, Stephen may demand that a suitable alternative must be made available, and the full fee will still be payable.

8. Venue Details: - It is your responsibility to ensure that Stephen has the correct information for finding your venue. If you have supplied him with an incorrect postcode or street name, he will be unable to find you and you will still be liable. Stephen takes no liability for any late / non arrival if the address is wrong, so please check that it is correct. He will also not work in farms on high hilltops or venues that require a particular vehicle to get to.

9. Video / Photographs: - You are welcome to take as many photographs as you would like and video the entire performance should you wish. However that recording must remain with you and cannot be sold or given to anybody else without my permission. If you do choose to video the entire performance, Stephen will require a copy of the footage for his own publicity and record keeping. Stephen would also appreciate any photographs you wish to share with him, which you can send via e-mail.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Your discussion is point 2 on my list. Many of these points are abrupt and can be scary to read on the first glance. But they were written that way to be taken serious. It ensures a good show, and that I get paid no-matter what happens. I have re-worded this page many times since the first contract four years ago. I'm still open to suggestions for improvement if you have any.

There is no mention on my website itself of these terms just in case the client can be misconstrued into receiving them as something they are not. They are only seen by the client after the booking has been made. They are really only there for my own protection should they be needed.

In the UK, the law has become so precarious that most entertainers have no idea what they are liable for. Some parents do expect you to keep all 40 children completely silent, sat still, throughout the entire party, even when working next to a bouncy castle.
If just one child gets disruptive, they make it your responsibility and potentially it can lead to problems with payment.

I have done many shows when all the adults left me alone with the children. It only takes one child to lie and cause me a ton load of problems. I did stop one show which was in a house and 'request' that an adult remain in the room. The reason I gave was that they have no idea who I am and it was improper to leave your children along with a complete stranger. The adult remained in the room, however I have no idea what relation he was to the children.

In the end of the day, we all do are best. Problems will arise and hopefully pages like the above will never be of use to anybody. But its also a sign of professionalism. Whatever you do in life, whatever contract you sign, there are terms and conditions. As silly as it sounds, for the sake of professionalism; It would be in-proper to issue a contract without them.

Steve
Potty the Pirate
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Personally, I feel all the points in your contract are unneccessary for my purposes, Steve. Sure, if you've had problems with issues like this in the past, I can understand feeling that having T&Cs like this may be for you. I've never had problems, and in the very unlikely event that a client is less than happy to pay my fee, I'd be prepared to poiltely discuss the matter and come to a suitable compromise. In fact this has never happened, and although I've had 3 bounced cheques over the years, all were eventually paid.
I'm not sure that at a private party the law says one adult must be present for every 5 kids - surely this is the law for pre-schools, etc?
Also, I'd cut out the line about not being a mobile creche facility, it sounds somewhat sarcastic to me.
Perhaps I'm just lucky, but I don't seem to have problems with any of the things you mentioned. Yes, once in a while some kids may want to play footie, if it's a lovely day, and we're all outside. I don't see that as a problem. Never had ALL the kids rush off to play, the majority always want to watch the show.
Term 3 in your contract would worry me if I were a parent planning an outdoors party. Every back garden in the country has some of these things, it sounds almost as if you're saying that your show is less engaging than a wendy house? I always try to do the show indoors if I can, but if there are features like this in the garden, I use them during the games section of the party.
Last weekend I attended a party for a bunch of 8 year olds. At the start of the party, as it was the first really beautiful day for some time, all the kids wanted to do was play football. But I kept them busy with close-up magic for 10 mins, then played a couple of games, then the one hour show. Not one kid went to play football. However, had I been asked to perform outside, I suspect some of them would have divided their attention between me and the ball!
Andrew Zuber
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I think having a phone conversation with people ahead of time is far more effective for these kinds of things. Much like web forums (take a look around,) something in writing can often be taken in a different tone than it was meant, and that can put people off.

When talking with a client on the phone, I would have a set list of questions to ask them. This way I KNOW we've addressed all of these issues, rather than just sending something out that they may or may not read (and this is often the case....how may times have you read an entire contract before signing it?) That way I'm also flexible to ask other questions if I feel it's necessary, and they can do the same of me.

The more points or rules you send someone, the more reading they're going to have to do. To me that seems off putting, as though you're saying "I'll let you pay me to perform for your event, but you have to follow all of these rules first." I really like the idea of "tips for a successful party" or a FAQ page on the site. However as I said, I would have this conversation on the phone as well. That way you can address anything you feel is important, and the client hears your voice rather than just reading something that could be taken the wrong way.

It's about producing...when you produce a film or a television shoot, you visit the location, figure out parking, restrooms, and any other distractions or issues that need to be addressed. That way when you show up, you're ready to go. I'm not suggesting visiting the location before you perform a show unless you feel it's really necessary, but TALK with the client about these things. It makes the whole event much more smooth.
"I'm sorry - if you were right, I would agree with you." -Robin Williams, Awakenings
Potty the Pirate
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I agree, Andrew. In my opinion, T&Cs such as Steve has posted are probably unread nearly all the time. Heck, my confirmation letter is a short half page, with a slip to return at the bottom. It simply says "Yes please, Potty, come along to the party (or wedding/event, etc) at (address is inserted) on (date is inserted). We'd like: (then there is a box with the various options they can choose, and they tick whichever ones they want). I've also gotten around (finally) to doing a mail merge, so once I have all the booking details on my spreadsheet, I can just press a button, and "hey presto!" the letter is printed.
The reason I don't have terms and conditions is because....I don't have terms and conditions! If a client refused to pay me because he thought I wasn't worth paying, I'd rather accept that, than argue that I'd done the job, so I expect my money. I only want to be paid if the client is satisfied. Of course, this has never been an issue. I've often thought of including a "no-pay guarantee", which some entertainers do. Basically they state that if the party isn't 100%, the client needs to pay nothing. It occurs to me that this is going completely the other way, and rather than insisting that the client must pay if the kids behave badly, or disrupt the party, it's saying that if you can't handle the kids, the client has no obligation to pay. I suspect that no one ever refuses to pay, or takes up the guarantee, so it's a great little sales gimmick.
My attitude is to always accept that the customer is right. I have a background in sales and marketing, as well as retail. I have studied customer service, and I also think I'm naturally that way inclined. I like to please, and if my work isn't up to scratch, I would baulk at the idea of pressing a client to pay me more than he thinks I'm worth.
Red Shadow
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Unfortunately, the client not paying has been an issue. Not just for me but several entertainers in my area.

The reason I state payment is to be made 'before' commencement of the show is in case the venue is a pub, and they spend the money before the end of the party on drinks (which has happened).
On another occasion, I did a really great show at a nursery school, but I charged twice my normal rate as I had to travel quite a distance for the show and it was on Christmas Weekend. The client refuses to pay and only offered half my fee. The reason she gave was that the entertainer she hired in the summer charged that half-fee and she didn't want to pay any more. I asked why she didn't book him again, and she replied he was already booked up.
Anyway, I said we agreed on a fee. The show went great and she had signed a contract agreeing to the amount. She refused to pay so I phoned equity and a week later I had my money.
In this case, the show was great and I went above and beyond to make her children happy. This was just a case of her not wanting to pay the amount agreed upon because she though that as a 'clown'; I was someone to be taken advantage off.

Unfortunately, I see that a lot. When you arrive to do a kids party looking like a clown, no-one takes you seriously. They often think you are an uneducated person who can't get a proper job. How often do we hear the client say 'What do you do for a living?' when were in the middle of a show!
It doesn't matter that I have three degrees, have written 8 books and produced 12 DVDs, along with running my own successful business for 16 years. All they see is a clown costume and they think I'm an easy target.

I also know I'm not alone in this situation. I speak to many of the entertainers in my area and this is a common problem. Terms and conditions help signify for some reason that you are a legit business and that there are consequences for mistreatment. Its the first indication that you are an actual professional entertainer, and not just a hobbyist.

Steve

P.S: Also, it cannot be done over the phone. Legal work like this has to be done in writing. I also find that most clients don't want to talk about stuff like this, its scary and intimidating and can often lose you the booking if you make them think about everything that could go wrong.
It most often goes unread, I know that. But legally I am protected and I get taken more seriously as a entertainer and actual business. Which means I get fewer cancellations.
seadog93
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Quote:
On 2011-03-25 15:17, ku7uk3 wrote:
How often do we hear the client say 'What do you do for a living?' when were in the middle of a show!



How often DO you hear that?
I've never had that happen ...yet. As mentioned before I am not a seasoned pro, so it could just be luck that it hasn't occurred. For me so far people tend to assume that I'm a full time pro (unless they meet me at the library first) and I try not to disappoint them by mentioning my 'day job.'
"Love is the magician who pulls man out of his own hat" - Ben Hecht

"Love says 'I am everything.' Wisdom says 'I am nothing'. Between the two, my life flows." -Nisargadatta Maharaj

Seadog=C-Dawg=C.ou.rtn.ey Kol.b
Tony James
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Quote:
On 2011-03-24 06:20, magicgeorge wrote:
I am better than everyone on this thread because I have dealt with every disruptive child and volatile situation perfectly.

I also crap rainbows and turn up to my shows on a unicorn.


Thank God for George - sanity amongst insanity. About the only post worth reading here. What a daft thread.

Have none of you any work to do or shows to book?
Tony James

Still A Child At Heart
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