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jolyonjenkins
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Inner circle
United Kingdom
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Really, you get used to working with what you have. I got the bandsaw before the table saw, and I still prefer it because it's quieter and feel I'm less likely to have an accident with it. The planer saves a huge amount of time compared to manual planing. The thicknesser alters your whole attitude to timber and I wouldn't be without it. But I've managed without a router table so far.
Jolyon Jenkins
Ray Pierce
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Inner circle
Los Angeles, CA
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I must admit that as much as I use my table saw for smaller pieces, I use a large panel saw for ripping and cross cutting ply. It's just easier to do by myself without taking up as much space. Not near as good for really accurate things like cabinet making but I'm usually making larger props where its just not an issue. Just depends on the scale of what you're building.
Ray Pierce
<BR>www.HollywoodAerialArts.com
ringmaster
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Inner circle
Memphis, Down in Dixie
1679 Posts

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Meaning no disrespect, but at his level of experience, he needs to watch Norm and subscribe to Wood magazine more than he needs a a 10" cabinet saw.
Less than 2% of reported UFO's turn out to be actual interplanetary vehicles.
EsnRedshirt
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Quote:
On 2011-06-28 18:05, rjenkins wrote:
Really, you get used to working with what you have. I got the bandsaw before the table saw, and I still prefer it because it's quieter and feel I'm less likely to have an accident with it. The planer saves a huge amount of time compared to manual planing. The thicknesser alters your whole attitude to timber and I wouldn't be without it. But I've managed without a router table so far.

Totally the opposite for me, I've got a cover over my table saw blade, and I think I'd be more likely to have an accident with the open blade on a bandsaw. Though my college drama department had an old rip saw table with zero protection on it at all. No student was ever allowed to use it.

Which reminds me, don't disable the safety on any of your tools unless you absolutely have to ( say, for example, to make a non-through cut), and replace the safety as soon as you're done. You can buy a top-of-the-line table saw with the latest European safety devices for the amount it costs to re-attach a severed finger.
Self-proclaimed Jack-of-all-trades and google expert*.

* = Take any advice from this person with a grain of salt.
motivationalmagic
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Pennsylvania
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Hey guys, I finished my cabinet making class today! It was such a wealth of information, and one of the best classes I have ever taken in any subject matter. The instructor was fabulous. I learned so much. Well worth it. Shaved a huge bulk of time off of the learning curve had I not taken the class under such an experienced instructor.

This thread is just so awesome! Huge amounts of tips, insights and ideas! Many thanks to all of you! I am incredibly grateful! Love you guys, man!

I still have to hook up that table saw I picked up over the weekend. The iron on that behmoth must be 500 pounds, or more. They took part of it apart to fit it in our vehicle. Now I have to figure out how to reassemble it. In hindsight, I should have told the guy I'll buy it only if he delivers it. Nearly wrenched my back getting it out of our SUV.

Found it on Craig's List. I'm guessing it is like 30 years old. I'll look up the model number and stuff and find out the specifics on its date and download a manual and such. But he says a sturdy work horse that has never caused him a problem.

Any specific suggestions for making my first Crosscut sled? Any pictures available?

Thanks again, everyone! Your kindness with such an abundance of help just blows my mind!
Motivational Magic
"The Magician on a Mission to Motivate"
www.MotivationalMagic.com
AGMagic
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Cailf.
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I Googled crosscut sled and found this http://www.thewoodshop.20m.com/howto_crosscut.htm There are lots of others.
Tim Silver - http://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-Woodshop/122578214436546

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

Visualize Whirled Peas!
Michael Baker
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Eternal Order
Near a river in the Midwest
11161 Posts

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Quote:
On 2011-06-29 00:18, motivationalmagic wrote:


Any specific suggestions for making my first Crosscut sled? Any pictures available?



Look at my drawing above for a rough idea. Cut two runners that fit in the miter gauge slots on your saw table. They should be as close to the same width as possible, but still able to slide freely in the slots. You don't want any significant side to side play. These runners should be about 1/32" - 1/16" higher than the depth of the miter gauge slots, and long enough to reach from the near edge of the table, to about where the leading edge of the blade is (a little longer won't hurt).

Cut a piece of 1/2" plywood a bit wider than the distance between the miter gauge slots and long enough to reach from the near edge of the table to just your side of the leading edge of the saw blade.

Set the runners in the miter gauge slots and coat the top surfaces with wood glue. Glue the plywood on top of the runners. Allow to dry.

Mark a spot on the plywood surface about 3" or so from the near edge. This will be where the backstop fence will be located.

Turn on your saw and cut a kerf slot from the leading edge of the sled (the plywood), as far back as the mark.

Use a square to position and glue a piece of wood that will be the backstop fence. This should be about 2" - 4" high, and as wide as the sled. Be sure it is positioned perfectly perpendicular to the blade.

Add the thumb guards as seen in the drawing above.

Continue cutting the slot in the sled all the way through the plywood from front to back. The backstop fence holds everything together.

You can add a stop block that you can clamp in place at adjustable positions along the backstop fence. This allows you to make multiple cuts with all pieces being the same length. Measure from the stop block to the closest edge of the blade. It can be positioned on either side of the blade. You can mark measurements along the fence or the surface of the sled to speed up positioning the stop block.

By not using the stop block, you can run longer lengths of wood through the saw, and the sled will serve to keep the board square with the blade, and will also cut way down on friction, making it much easier to push a piece of wood through the blade. The only surfaces that touch the table are the runners.
~michael baker
The Magic Company
remote guy
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Maryland
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I used a homemade crosscut sled for years but decided to take the plunge and buy this one http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=18063&filter=sled

One of the best purchases I have ever made!

Rockler will put this sled on sale a few times a year for a $100.00.


Nick
Bapu
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with a paltry
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Hey motivationalmagic

I just want to mention one tool that won't set you back a fortune and is one of my favorites for quick, strong, joinery...especially for cabinets: the Kreg Jig for pocket screw joinery.

You can learn more about it here: http://www.kregtool.com/Pocket-Hole-Jigs-Prodlist.html

Lowe's sells them, Home Depot does not.

I have just finished another great cabinet for my daughter's kitchen. I have made several for her, both floor and wall mount. All with just these tools:

Miter Saw mounted on home-made stand
Table Saw (A small one) mounted on home-made stand
A good router (Porter-Cable) mounted in a home-made router table.
Kreg Jig with Kreg clamps and Kreg pocket screws.
Bosch battery powered driver (Love it!)
Ryobi battery powered circular saw (How did I ever get by without it!)
Assorted clamps, hammer, screwdiver.

I have not read all the posts above, so forgive me if someone has already mentioned this, but your first project should be to build yourself a decent work bench. (The Kreg tool site has free plans for work benches and cabinet joinery.)

As for ripping and cutting 4x8 sheets of plywood, just have them do that for you where you buy it. I do, and can usually cart it all home in the back of my Honda Fit. No kidding!

Oh yes, one last thing...get yourself a big bottle of Gorilla glue.

Now get out there and make some sawdust!
Bapu practices law and conjuring in the Great Smoky Mountains of East Tennessee.
makeupguy
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Inner circle
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I mentioned this on another thread.. but this was a recent addition to my shop.. and I don't know how I ever survived without it..

cuts forward and reverse... NEVER BINDS.. and will cut almost anything.. including sheet metal, plastic, wood.. and with a blade change.. tile and glass.

https://www.asseenontv.com/detail.php?p=......odIUNjVg

one of the few things that REALLY DOES WORK LIKE IT SAYS ON TV!!

I LOVE MINE!!!
Michael Baker
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Eternal Order
Near a river in the Midwest
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Nick,

Good call on that Rockler sled. Having a built in miter gauge eliminates the need for extra sleds. Having it adjustable is good, too. Because my table saw is so small, I prefer one that rides both miter gauge slots, though.

David's mention of a workbench is good, too. (I didn't read back through the posts either!)

One thing that I don't recall being mentioned is how fast your effective workspace diminishes as you begin to acquire tools. I used to make illusions for my own show. Now, I hardly have room to set out a handful of Die Boxes! Ha!

~michael
~michael baker
The Magic Company
motivationalmagic
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Pennsylvania
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AGMagic,
That link looks great! The animation makes it easier to understand! Thanks for the link!

Michael,
Thank you for the information on building a sled. Unfortunately I do not understand most of the terminology. I need a wood working for dummies book that has a list of terminology! lol I kind of understand the picture, but not fully. I’ve read through it a few times and picked up on the meaning of some of the terms, but still cannot follow the overall concept of what to do.

RemoteGuy,
Thanks for that link to the Rockler sled!

David,
I just finished a cabinet making class, and had the good fortune of being able to use that very same Kreg Jig for doing the cabinet joinery. Such a great jig. It was very cool putting the face frame together for the cabinet using that Kreg Jig. (We were all joking about what a smart guy this Kreg fellow must be! lol). Oh, I did just spot the Kreg Jig at Home Depot for $100. The same thing was $140 at the Woodcraft store.

Makeupguy,
I just watched the entire demo video for that saw. Truly incredible! I want one! I’m curious, though, how a saw can manage to do something which creates straight cuts. I just used my circular saw all day long today building something, and I found out that I never really had a straight cut with the circular saw unless I used a home-made fence or guide. How does that DualSaw always get such a straight cut like they do on the video? (Oh, man, I was thinking what a punk joke it might be to cut your buddy’s car in half like on the video!)

Michael,
Glad you mentioned that about having a sled that rides in both miter slots. I'm guessing that gives the sled more stability and less play back and forth? (And I’ve been wondering if there is a name for those two slots on the table saw. Now I know! lol). We live in the mountains, so fortunately space is somewhat flexible. I’ve been looking at these prefab sheds that are 12x25, and sell for $5400. Thinking that might make a nice space for a prop biulding shop, as well as storage for whatever I build.
Motivational Magic
"The Magician on a Mission to Motivate"
www.MotivationalMagic.com
Michael Baker
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Eternal Order
Near a river in the Midwest
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Richard,

The concept of a sled is pretty easy. It's just a carriage that follows the miter gauge slots, and allows you to push boards through the blade, instead of having to push the board itself.

It actually makes cutting easier by stabilizing the board. This eliminates much of the kickback possibility, which is usually caused when a board is accidentally twisted into binding with the spinning blade.

This can easily happen, especially when using a rip fence as a guide for cross cutting. In that case, the board has to be pushed along the length of the fence.

Image


Friction can occur, causing the board to shift or twist, and bind between the blade and the fence. What can happen is that the blade will grab the board and kick it back at you. Not a good thing, and potentially dangerous... more so the higher the horsepower of the motor.

The sled allows for a the use of a stop block, which sets the desired length on the sled, so the board remains stationary in relationship to the stop block. Length of cut is however limited to the size of the sled.

Image


Stop blocks allow for multiple cuts of the same size with great efficiency.

~michael
~michael baker
The Magic Company
George Ledo
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Magic Café Columnist
SF Bay Area
2884 Posts

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Quote:
On 2011-06-29 23:11, motivationalmagic wrote:
I just finished a cabinet making class, and had the good fortune of being able to use that very same Kreg Jig for doing the cabinet joinery. Such a great jig. It was very cool putting the face frame together for the cabinet using that Kreg Jig. (We were all joking about what a smart guy this Kreg fellow must be! lol). Oh, I did just spot the Kreg Jig at Home Depot for $100. The same thing was $140 at the Woodcraft store.

Sounds like a great (and short) class. Where was it? How long was it?
That's our departed buddy Burt, aka The Great Burtini, doing his famous Cups and Mice routine
www.georgefledo.net

Latest column: "Sorry about the photos in my posts here"
EsnRedshirt
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Newark, CA
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Quote:
On 2011-06-29 23:11, motivationalmagic wrote:

... We live in the mountains, so fortunately space is somewhat flexible. I’ve been looking at these prefab sheds that are 12x25, and sell for $5400. Thinking that might make a nice space for a prop biulding shop, as well as storage for whatever I build.

Make sure it's got a very wide door (preferably a roll-up or garage style door), because no matter the size, you're going to eventually run into a situation where you want to stick the long end of a sheet of plywood out of it. (And I've read a story or two about someone building an illusion in their new workshop, only to discover it was too big to get through the door.) Oh- if you're using it for storage and construction, put in a divider to act as a dust cover, or your props will be covered in sawdust.

I wish I had space like that... who am I kidding? It'd just end up as cluttered up as my garage workshop already is anyway.
Self-proclaimed Jack-of-all-trades and google expert*.

* = Take any advice from this person with a grain of salt.
gimpy2
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Quote:
On 2011-06-29 23:11, motivationalmagic wrote:

Makeupguy,
I just watched the entire demo video for that saw. Truly incredible! I want one! I’m curious, though, how a saw can manage to do something which creates straight cuts. I just used my circular saw all day long today building something, and I found out that I never really had a straight cut with the circular saw unless I used a home-made fence or guide. How does that DualSaw always get such a straight cut like they do on the video? (Oh, man, I was thinking what a punk joke it might be to cut your buddy’s car in half like on the video!)



Heres some tips for cutting straight with a circular saw. Mark a narrow but vissable line. Follow the side of the line with the side of the blade don't try to split the line. forget the guide mark on the saw keep your eye on the spinning blade and the side of the line.

Michael,

Nice job on the art work and detail description. You need to write a book, FANTASTIC!
Michael Baker
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Eternal Order
Near a river in the Midwest
11161 Posts

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Quote:
On 2011-06-30 15:02, gimpy2 wrote:


Michael,

Nice job on the art work and detail description. You need to write a book, FANTASTIC!


I guess I was too lazy to drag out my camera an shoot a photo of the real thing! Ha! I figured, well I'm already sitting here on my butt...

It was the middle of the night, too.

Not sure about the book, but today I came up with the idea for a topic here devoted entirely to workshop words of wisdom. I want them to be cryptic but enough to conjure up random images. My first entry...

"You really begin to understand the integrity of something after you hit it with a hammer."

~michael
~michael baker
The Magic Company
gimpy2
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Heres mine.

"measure twice and cut once or up to five times tell it fits then hit it up to five times till it goes in the hole then thwow the piece away and mesure better"
AGMagic
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Cailf.
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A few thoughts on sleds. The boards or runners that go in the mitre slots can be hardwood, UHMW plastic or store bought sled runners. They sould fit the slots so the sled moves freely with no slop. Hardwood runners will vary in dimension as the weather changes which, depending on the weather where you live can be significant. UHMW plastic is stable and easily machineable and of course most store bought runners have adjustment screws and can be adjusted to the proper fit. Whatever material you use, the runners should not come in contact with the bottom of the slot.

Build your sled and get it square, then carefully raise the blade up through the sled to make the cutting slot. This will insure that the blade does not bind in a pre-cut slot and will keep the kerf on the sled as narrow as possible. Make sure the fence on the sled has some adjustment so you can be sure that the fence is square to the blade. And make sure that your saw is properly set up BEFORE you make a sled.

You will probably need two or more sleds, one for crosscuts, one for fixed 45 deg. miters, one adjustable for other than 45 deg. miters and perhaps a large sled for trimming panels.

One thought on Michale's post above...don't use your rip fence for a stop block when crosscutting, it is very dangerous because the cut off piece can easily get caught between the blad and the fence. Instead, clamp a block of wood to the rip fence in front of the blade and use that your stop block. A 1" or thicker block works well. The work piece should be clear of the stop block before it reaches the blade. That way if the piece should happen to twist if will not get caught between the blade and the fence and become a thrown accross the shop or into you!

Michael - my addition "To the man with a hammer, every problem looks like a nail."
Tim Silver - http://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-Woodshop/122578214436546

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

Visualize Whirled Peas!
AGMagic
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Cailf.
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Or as we ued to say in the amusement park business "Mark it with a grease pen, cut it with an axe, file to fit, paint to match."
Tim Silver - http://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-Woodshop/122578214436546

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

Visualize Whirled Peas!
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