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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Penny for your thoughts » » What was the toughest thing you had to learn? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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ChrisWall
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England
116 Posts

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To stop reading and reading and reading trying to learn everything and realising you learn more from working on one effect until it's right than digesting every new method.

It's actually hard to pick just one thing but I've learnt so much from reading past posts on this and other forums.

Chris.
"Have your cake and eat it... there's no other reason to have a cake" - Derren Brown

http://www.chrisreadsminds.co.uk
false_shuffle
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Omaha, NE
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Staying in character even when you're not performing? Really? Why is that necessary?
Daniel Rasmussen
Omaha, NE
The great Gumbini
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To be me. I've learned from some very wonderful and successful mentalists and magicians and it would be all to easy to want to copy them. It took some trial and error but I'm comfortable with how I perform today. And my advice is to be yourself. You may never be like your favorite mentalist or magician but then again they may never be like you either! Have fun and be YOU. After all the biggest entertainment you bring to a show is YOU.


Good magic to all,


Eric
phantomtollbooth
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As a late bloomer, all of the above Smile
Tom Jorgenson
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LOOSE ANGLES, CALIFORNIA
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What Gumbini said.
We dance an invisible dance to music they cannot hear.
JohnWells
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The Southern Wild
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For every fancy gimmick and new "big secret", there's a much simpler idea already in the literature that probably works better.
Looch
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Off by
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Quote:
On 2011-07-26 03:28, JohnWells wrote:
For every fancy gimmick and new "big secret", there's a much simpler idea already in the literature that probably works better.


This made me laugh..its so true!


Also...the transition from performing close up to stand up and vice versa.
Rebecca_Harris
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That is so very true, I've lost track of how much I've bought only to later find a far simpler and usually better method in Corinda or Annemann
innermind
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suburban Detroit
154 Posts

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I used to be very long-winded, and it was hard for me not to over present. It took a long time to eventually learn to keep routines simple, concise & to the point.





David
"Everything is funny as long as it is happening to somebody else." -Will Rogers
Decomposed
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Eternal Order
High Desert
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Performing propless mentalism.
parmenion
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Switzerland/Zürich
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Quote:
On 2011-07-25 21:44, false_shuffle wrote:
Staying in character even when you're not performing? Really? Why is that necessary?


:)
“I love talking about nothing. It is the only thing I know anything about.”
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Sean Giles
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Quote:
On 2011-07-25 21:44, false_shuffle wrote:
Staying in character even when you're not performing? Really? Why is that necessary?


I'm guessing he means when talking to people after a show.
powerwords
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Indonesia
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Quote:
On 2011-07-25 21:44, false_shuffle wrote:
Staying in character even when you're not performing? Really? Why is that necessary?


when a mentalist believes that he is "special" he has to be ready to perform anytime, anywhere when asked by anyone. what would you do when you use your character only when performing and another day someone who recognizes you on the street asks you to show them something? would you act like an ordinary person or as the character you have chosen? would it be easy for you to change from ordinary person to the character you always use when performing in a split second? Not easy for me.
in my opinion, it is easier for me to stay in my character. on or off-stage, when performing or not.
BE GOOD, if you can't then BE CAREFUL, if it's hard then BE BAD!!!
Mr. Ree
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Sedona AZ
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To not be too critical of myself and to actually start enjoying myself while “performing”.
Being more at ease allows those around me to be more at ease.
(Don’t think for a minute that an audience doesn’t sense if you are tense.)

johncesta: I was a programmer and a musician.

(Now to item 2.) Coming up with a new avatar. Smile
An idea can turn to dust or magic, depending on the talent that rubs against it.
---- William Bernbach (1911 - 1982) ----

(After 25 years of PCs, everything switched to Macs, June 2008)
DallasCarter
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Learning to leave the impromptu, walk around close up magician mind frame in order to proper understand, study and execute mentalism.
mastermindreader
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Seattle, WA
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You'll get there Dallas. You have a good attitude.

Good thoughts,

Bob
DWRackley
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Chattanooga, TN
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Keeping the time-line straight (when I’m supposed to know something versus when the audience knows it.) It all works out in rehearsal (LONG before the performance), but keeping my “reactions” in sync with my “revelations” usually takes me longer than anything else.
...what if I could read your mind?

Chattanooga's Premier Mentalist

Donatelli and Company at ChattanoogaPerformers.com

also on FaceBook
dmkraig
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Quote:
On 2011-07-26 23:33, powerwords wrote:
Quote:
On 2011-07-25 21:44, false_shuffle wrote:
Staying in character even when you're not performing? Really? Why is that necessary?


when a mentalist believes that he is "special" he has to be ready to perform anytime, anywhere when asked by anyone. what would you do when you use your character only when performing and another day someone who recognizes you on the street asks you to show them something? would you act like an ordinary person or as the character you have chosen? would it be easy for you to change from ordinary person to the character you always use when performing in a split second? Not easy for me.
in my opinion, it is easier for me to stay in my character. on or off-stage, when performing or not.


In a workshop given by Jeff McBride, he said the same thing is true for great magicians. Actually, I think it's true of all performers.

I happened to briefly meet Harry Anderson at a restaurant. He was wearing his suspenders and hat.
I met Mae West long after she was a sex symbol. She was still playing her "Diamond Lil" character in her accent, double entendres, and the way she walked.
I have a friend who is a large fellow with long, pure-white hair and a white beard. Around Christmas he makes thousands playing Santa Claus. We were at a restaurant, and a little girl stared at him with wide eyes. Her mother came over and said that her daughter thought he was Santa Claus. He told her that he did play Santa and to bring the girl over. He talked with the girl ("I'm not in my usual clothes because I'm on vacation") and told her to be good and he would bring her a special gift for Christmas. The girl and her family were ecstatic.
Jim-Callahan
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What many miss is that character is part of you and it has
nothing to do with being able perform at any time.

Being an interesting character/person is not the same as being in character.

Many mentalists and magicians wish it to be a truth that they are truly great
or can be if they are ready with a trick to prove who they are and what they can do at any time.

I will and do concede and agree that is a character of sorts.
The ready always to do something sort.
He is the guy found behind the counter of a magic shop or mall kiosk.

Are most people really interested in a person who must have a prop or trick
to interface with others or to be interesting?
If that were the case I put forth the opinion that magic shops would be
filled with regular people.

Most every woman I have ever seen in a magic shop looks as though she was slipped a double dose of SOMA
and hit with a cattle prod between the eyes.

Developing into a person others are interested in or wish to spend time with is not as easy as being
a fellow who is always ready with a trick.

For example.

When one learns to do readings it adds depth to one’s character both theatrically and personally.

It is esoteric knowledge that other do not possess.
You have the knowledge an understanding of how to apply it.

I know for a fact it is better to speak with people about esoteric subjects that I have knowledge
of personally and they have an interest in than to do a mental trick to prove what I can do.

In the first instance the focus is one’s self in the second it is at least once removed.

It is very important for a performer to have a back story that is true.

Sorry for the long ramble.

Jim

H.o.A-X
“I can make Satan’s devils dance like fine gentlemen across the stage of reality”.
David Thiel
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Western Canada...where all that oil is
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Quote:
On 2011-07-28 10:50, Jim-Callahan wrote:

Most every woman I have ever seen in a magic shop looks as though she was slipped a double dose of SOMA
and hit with a cattle prod between the eyes.


Jim

H.o.A-X


Ah! So you've seen my wife with me at magic shops...!

A very, very good analysis, Jim.

David
Whatever doesn't kill you makes you stronger. Except bears. Bears will kill you.


www.MindGemsBrainTrust.com
www.magicpendulums.com
www.MidnightMagicAndMentalism.com
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