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darylrogers
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Wisconsin
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I have an old U. F. Grant Egyptian Water Box I am trying to repaint. In my current show I call it an Egyptian Mystery Box, but the only reason it is Egyptian is because I say it is. I want to add some sort of Egyptian motif to the front panel but have been having a very difficult time. I repainted it with spray enamel paint, then tried to make a stencil of Egyptian hieroglyphs, but the enamel paint I used got under the stencil, and after it dried I could just peel the paint off! Does anyone have a suggestion? I am attaching an image I found online of the effect I am looking for, though it doesn't have to be as intricate as this.

Image
Dr. Solar
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Citrus Heights, Ca.
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Did you use the same type of paint? You can't spray lacquer over enamel or vice versa. Did you paint the second or third colors within the time frame suggested, within one or two hours or after twenty four? Get some stencil adhesion spray at your local craft store to adhere your stencil so you help eliminate any undercutting of spray. Did you shake the can enough to mix the contents? If you did not get enough pigment on it might have been easy to wipe off.

Work on some sample pieces and don't use OSH or Watmart low end sprays. They lack pigment and are very runny and take way too many coats
"look for me in all things forgotten"
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Bill Hegbli
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Eternal Order
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1st, that does not look like a U.F. Grant Water Box. I been in magic since the 1960's and Grant never painted the box in those colors that I am aware of.

Anyway, Dr. Solar has some good advice, I would add these:

After the paint dries, sand the area of the stencil with 600 grit wet/dry sandpaper. This will give good gripping of the stencil paint. It is best to make a stencil for sanding, that way, you will not scratch the surrounding surface.

Use stencil paper, not anything lying around the house. Stencil paper is stiffer and is treated to not let the paint soak through.

Spray at a 90 degree angle to the surface, moving your arm perpendicular to the surface. Not in any kind of arc.

Spray in very light coats. The reason it went under your stencil is because you over sprayed, or sprayed at an angle or arc and it went under the stencil (the pressure of the spray can forced the stencil up), or wait a few seconds or minutes between light coats. In other words don't over spray.

Hope these tips help. Good Luck!
darylrogers
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Wisconsin
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I did use the same kind of paint. I did not paint right away, though, it was long time after. I do shake the can like a maniac when using spray. I believe my mistake was a combination of waiting too long and using an incorrect stencil method. William, I knew you would have some good suggestions, too. I would never have thought of using the stencil to sand with as well. Thank you both. If I ever get it done like I want I will be sure to post a photo.

The image is just something I found online that I want mine to look like. Mine came with a really weird paint job. The sides were black with a faded line of gold on the top and bottom, and the front and back panels were bright yellow with what I can only describe as a drizzle of red paint all over. It made for a very strange combination of painting effects.
JamesinLA
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Los Angeles
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I usually use page size labels to add artwork to my projects. You can design them on your computer and match the color of the paint, then just peal and stick.

Jim
Oh, my friend we're older but no wiser, for in our hearts the dreams are still the same...
darylrogers
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Wisconsin
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Excellent idea.
jay leslie
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William

That's an early version, made by Jim Swoger, for Grant. I have 4 different models, in our museum, including one that's red, two with different silkscreen designs, and one that's all plastic, All were made by Jim before JK took over.
Dr. Solar
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Jay,

Where is your museum? Is it open to the public? Any vent items?

Doc
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Spellbinder
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If you'e not set on continuing the Egyptian theme, consider a "Water Sprite" theme or even a "Lady of the Lake" in which you draw a sword from the box after pouring in the water and "suspending it in the air." Replace the plastic "glass" with a decorative vase "Foo or Lota" gimmicked. Just because it started Egyptian doesn't mean it has to remain so forevermore.
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wkitwizard
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Los Angeles
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Here are some Egyptian theme graphics for standard magic shop props:
http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss308......%20Magic

I've also repainted the Egyptian Water Box with new graphics but will have to send photo
when I've taken a shot of it.

Good Luck!
Nothing is truer than the incomprehensible, because the sum total of our knowledge consists of the fact that we know nothing. Our reality is an illusion. Thus illusion is reality-Punx
darylrogers
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Wisconsin
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Wow, those graphics are fantastic! I would very much like to see your repainted box if you get a chance to take a picture.
wkitwizard
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Here is the WaterBox:
http://s586.photobucket.com/albums/ss308......rBox.jpg
I added four legs, and magnetic doors so they wouldn't open while performing with glass.
Nothing is truer than the incomprehensible, because the sum total of our knowledge consists of the fact that we know nothing. Our reality is an illusion. Thus illusion is reality-Punx
darylrogers
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Wisconsin
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Holy Man! That is beautiful! Did you just free-hand paint that?
Bill Hegbli
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Fort Wayne, Indiana
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Quote:
On 2011-08-01 22:29, jay leslie wrote:
William

That's an early version, made by Jim Swoger, for Grant. I have 4 different models, in our museum, including one that's red, two with different silkscreen designs, and one that's all plastic, All were made by Jim before JK took over.


Thanks Jay, I was going to say it looked like James Swoger work.
wkitwizard
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Thanks. Yes, the painting was all hand done.
Nothing is truer than the incomprehensible, because the sum total of our knowledge consists of the fact that we know nothing. Our reality is an illusion. Thus illusion is reality-Punx
Ron Reid
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Phoenix, Arizona
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Hi Daryl:

Another option is to use waterslide decals - here are a couple of Eqyptian Water boxes that I've repainted. The graphics are waterslide decals and you can buy them on ebay and other places.

Ron

Image


Image
Spellbinder
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The Holy City of East Orange, NJ
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That's inspiring! I can see pouring water in, etc. and at the end removing a rose vase filled with realistic spring roses.

I even picked out a vase I would use with a box this nice: http://www.amazon.com/Royal-Albert-Count......sr=1-132

The pierced holes around the top would be great for hanging onto spring flower strings.
Professor Spellbinder

Professor Emeritus at the Turkey Buzzard Academy of Magik, Witchcraft and Wizardry

http://www.magicnook.com

Publisher of The Wizards' Journals
Ray Pierce
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Los Angeles, CA
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Wow... there is some beautiful work on here!

For me, the difference between the stenciling/hand painting and the decals is in the distance of the performer to the audience.

If you're up very close, the decals have so much more detail and will look great. If you're on a larger stage, the detail will be lost and the stenciling will read a lot better. My instinct is that you probably won't be doing it on a really large stage so the decals could be an advantage if you can find ones you like.
Ray Pierce
Michael Baker
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Eternal Order
Near a river in the Midwest
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Quote:
On 2011-08-02 23:52, Ray Pierce wrote:
Wow... there is some beautiful work on here!

For me, the difference between the stenciling/hand painting and the decals is in the distance of the performer to the audience.

If you're up very close, the decals have so much more detail and will look great. If you're on a larger stage, the detail will be lost and the stenciling will read a lot better. My instinct is that you probably won't be doing it on a really large stage so the decals could be an advantage if you can find ones you like.


One advantage of custom decals is the ability to take that into account. There are limitations based upon the printer size, but making your own allows for those considerations of whether the piece is for close-up or stage/platform viewing.

Stencils are a different technique. It is possible to get somewhat fine(r) detail, but it's not easy. The work of Warren Hamilton comes to mind. Some of his stenciled pieces are really appreciated for their detail when viewed up close. Thayer's stencil work was based more on large blocks of color, although even some of that can be rather busy when viewed from a distance.

Either technique can be used to render larger, color block graphics, but as I said, decals are limited to the size of the available printer, unless several are used as sections of a larger image. That's possible, as well.

The really fine detail is largely a collector's passion, though.
~michael baker
The Magic Company
Ray Pierce
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Los Angeles, CA
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Agreed, the advantage of stenciling is in the mass repetition. When you get into really detailed custom airbrush work with friskets you can do amazing things as well. It's still hard to get the detail you can with the decals.

Instead of stenciling now, a lot of people use vinyl cutters for larger props. I was on some TV show and we were making a one off prop. The Art Director looked through a book of clip art scrolling, scanned it, scaled it and had it cut out of gold vinyl to apply to the corners of the prop. He did the same thing with some Asian inspired detailing in the middle in a different color. Those were the days when they would get an idea at the run through and we would have the prop on set the next day!
Ray Pierce
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