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gimpy2
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Worked on a lot of wet basements over the years and never found one that couldn't be fixed. Sometimes its just as simple as getting the water to drain away from the house better. Lots of cheap ways to do that. Of course it can also be more complex and expensive. But if its been dry for years something has changed so if you can figure out what it is you can fix it. Be glad to help you trouble shoot just let me know.
Michael Baker
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Maybe find a way to fix El Nino. I think it was more that we have had a LOT of rain in a short amount of time. I've seen this river flood before, but it typically happens over a drawn out period. I don't recall ever seeing it rise this quickly. The river is a mile wide where I am. That's is a LOT of water coming down all at one time.

But, I would challenge you to battle a hurricane at that house I had in Birmingham! Ha!

Here, the floor drain has basically been unused for so long, it may be worth checking it to make sure it isn't clogged. At least any water would stand a chance of draining out if it did get in. When we had record floods a couple years ago, that drain was my concern. I was keeping a close eye on the river levels, comparing the water mark on the fence across the street with the depth of the basement floor. At a certain point, if ground water takes over, there isn't really much that can be done.

That happened to me when I lived in another house down the street back in the early 1980s. It was closer to the river, and once the ground water started to come in it was spewing through the block walls like little water fountains. I'm actually surprised the walls didn't buckle and collapse. That's when we shut the power off and moved out for the duration. Within a day or so, the river had surrounded the foundation, so the water in the basement naturally rose to that same level. (Lota basement. Ha!) Top step going to the basement was under water. Now THAT was a mess.

I was using a row boat as a taxi to periodically check my stuff upstairs. When the water finally subsided, I was finding lots of strange things. Mushrooms started growing in the basement and I was finding wolf spiders the size of a hockey puck. But that summer, my garden was AMAZING! All that added fertilizer from the river water did something. My tomato vines grew to the top of a six foot trellis and back down to the ground again! Bumper crop!
~michael baker
The Magic Company
gimpy2
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Well of course nothing will stop a flood. How ever if you have a floor drain then that means the sewer is lower than the basement floor. I would guess the drain tile that is around the footing is hooked up to the sewer line. Not allowed by code these days but many old homes are plumbed this way. Might run a snake and see if you can get it running again. This wont help if the drain tiles have silted in somwhere else but its a cheap thing to try.
Michael Baker
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Eternal Order
Near a river in the Midwest
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Thanks! You know a lot more about this stuff than I do.
~michael baker
The Magic Company
Michael Baker
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Near a river in the Midwest
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My workshop this morning. A little chilly, but still 20 degrees warmer than it is outside. I just fired up the kerosene heater, so it'll warm up nicely in about 15 minutes.

Image
~michael baker
The Magic Company
Wizard of Oz
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But the cold will help you make some more cool props.

Sorry.
Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.
gimpy2
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So nice to have a heated shop for the first winter ever.The old place had no heat in the main shop and the inside was colder than it was outside most of the winter. I feel for you Michael.
Michael Baker
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Fortunately, the new kerosene heater works great, even if it is a scary thing... like a fire breathing dragon. Ha! It's nice not having to wait a couple hours for the shop to warm up.
~michael baker
The Magic Company
gimpy2
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Those kerosene heaters can be great. Had one that we used in the kitchen for years with no problem. when the wick had to be replaced it never burned as clean and started giving dizzy spells. Not sure what the reason was.
Michael Baker
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I used one of the convention (wick) types up until this year. It did a good job, but when temps got down to single digits or below, it would take hours to heat that small room up enough to even feel your fingers. That was too much wasted time. Like you, wick replacement was my problem. I also never got the full hang of how to properly burn off the carbon. Over time, it would be hard to light, and would burn inefficiently, which does emit a lot more smoke and fumes.

Considering that most of those are about a hundred bucks, every couple years I'd just go buy a new one and save the aggravation. This year I opted for a forced air type. I would not bring this inside the living quarters if you paid me the replacement cost of everything in it.

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~michael baker
The Magic Company
gimpy2
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Oh heck those things put out the heat, watch the legs.
Michael Baker
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Yeah, the business end is pretty close to where I stand at my belt sander, so I have to turn the dragon off when I use it. Ha!
~michael baker
The Magic Company
gimpy2
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Have you thought of doing a rotisserie chicken while you work?
Michael Baker
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Hahaha!!!

OH, east is east, and west is west, and never the twain shall meet.

~Rudyard Kipling
~michael baker
The Magic Company
Michael Baker
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Eternal Order
Near a river in the Midwest
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Here are a few things that have come about recently...

Coin in wool...

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Jumbo Hot Rod

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Coin Box Deluxe (Lippincott)

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The Mystic Tube (2 different sizes)

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Raisin Box Die Box

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Mandarin Block Escape

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Lots more in the works, too!
~michael baker
The Magic Company
ThunderSqueak
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Wow, I really like your work Smile

One of the things I miss from growing up is a wood working shop. Seeing some of your projects makes me want to get back into it. Sadly I don't own the tools nor have the space anymore Smile

I look forward to seeing some more of your stuff in the future Smile
George Ledo
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Beautiful work as usual, Michael.

If you don't mind my asking, when you do a lidded box, like your coin in wool box, do you use the build-it-in-one-piece-and-cut-it-on-the-saw method? I've been doing this for years, but I still sweat a brick every time. I've put them on my cross-cut sled, I've used jigs, and I've just used the fence, and the only real difference seems to be the saw blade.
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gimpy2
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Im curious about that too. I do this all the time with big boxes but something that little and dainty would scare me.
Michael Baker
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Thanks, Jessie and George for your kind words!

Jessie, although my arsenal of tools has grown over the years, I still work with inexpensive ones. Most of the larger ones, except maybe the thickness planer, I've never paid more than a hundred bucks for. It's amazing how much can be done with so little. There are projects I'd love to tackle, but if they require a tool I either don't have, don't have room for, or can't afford, I just work on stuff that can be done with the stuff I have.

Regarding space, I do the majority of my work in my garage, which isn't big enough to park a single compact car... seriously. With my tools in there, there is barely enough room for me to walk around. Gimpy has seen my shop and can attest to what I am saying.


George and Gimpy,

The boxes that have a lid with depth are indeed made as one piece and then cut. I use a sled to insure a zero clearance for the blade, and I do my best to make sure the blade is set 90 degrees to the sled. Then, I do a shallow cut around the entire perimeter. This lets me check the alignment. Even with the blade/sled at 90 degrees, there is always a possibility that one side of the box is not. This can sometimes happen during sanding.

Such misalignment shows up at the corners when cutting. Small "steps" at the corners can be leveled later at the belt sander. If I see a problem early, I'll complete the cut by hand to minimize it, or recheck the blade alignment. If I spot a bad problem, that piece would end up in the trash. It has happened, but it's rare. Sometimes it's easier to start over than spend the time repairing mistakes.

Paying attention to which side gets the first cut can minimize tear-out at the corners, as can tape, or even a slave board at the back edge where the blade exits.

I have made a larger version of a Lippincott with a lid similar to the Coin in Wool box. Making such a box had it's own issues, the main one being that part of one side had to be glued during the assembly, but another part of the same panel had to remain sans glue, although pivot pins were installed. The box seemed totally solid when it was still in one piece, but once the lid was cut off, the necessary gimmick was perfectly aligned and ready to go. Smile
~michael baker
The Magic Company
Michael Baker
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A couple other items completed this weekend.

Vampire Block Escape

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Dice Trio

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~michael baker
The Magic Company
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