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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Nothing up my sleeve... » » Making Soft Coins Tutorial Video (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Bradley Morgan
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Well here it is, a short video clip (20 min) of my crazy method that I have used many times to put work into my coins. You can use this for any type of coin as far as I know. I have done copper, brass, silver and other junk metal type of coins and it has worked well for me. I have tried to cut out as much of talking as possible and leave you with the "Need To Know" stuff only. I hope I don't go into to many rants. Let me know if it helps anyone and if anyone has success in making thier coins soft. Best of luck

http://vimeo.com/m/37120738
"I do not know with what weapons World War 3 will be fought, but World War 4 will be fought with sticks and stones." - Einstein
Flyswatter
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Nice, I'm in the middle of watching it right now. The same principle can be applied to half dollars too right?
Bradley Morgan
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Oh yes! I have done many coin all sizes and metals. Best
"I do not know with what weapons World War 3 will be fought, but World War 4 will be fought with sticks and stones." - Einstein
JosephKerr
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Great tutorial video. Thanks a ton for sharing!
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Mb217
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Great tutorial and public service, especially for do-it-yourselfers. Always wondered why craftsman didn't make these things rather than just happening upon them here and there and charging a small fortune for them. It's crazy going around trying to match up coins to make sets. With this new guidance & how to, people can at least try it themselves and get decent success.

I have a nice set now (with a shell) that was done by a friend sorta the same ways you explain probably, and the set is wonderful, something I would pass down to my children to keep in the family and hopefully plant magic in someone's mind to pick it up and carry the love for it on. Smile

What would be nice is to figure out a machine that could do all those repetitive figure 8s and maybe some of that Dremmel work. Still it seems doable enough as you present it. It's all very interesting and I thank you for your great effort to provide it here. Great job!
*Check out my latest: Gifts From The Old Country: A Mini-Magic Book, MBs Mini-Lecture on Coin Magic, The MB Tanspo PLUS, MB's Morgan, Copper Silver INC, Double Trouble, FlySki, Crimp Change - REDUX!, and other fine magic at gumroad.com/mb217magic Smile


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Bradley Morgan
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Well I'm glad it's making sense. It's like watching moss grow on trees for me. Sorry for the gruff voice and low energy. I was very sick for about two weeks and that was the first day I could actually talk. So I hope it's not to bad. Thanks everyone.
"I do not know with what weapons World War 3 will be fought, but World War 4 will be fought with sticks and stones." - Einstein
Daniel Clemente
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I just ordered the bottle of blacken it...cant wait to get started on this...I got 1 walking liberty that is SUPER shiny and bold compared to the rest of my walkers...sad part is, that its a gaff coin!
Bradley Morgan
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I have also used this on a few gaff coins as well. You have to go very slow and be very careful. I have also just used Blacken-It to mach a normal coin to a gaffed coin.

Also I made a note at the end of the video about being careful about using to fine of a sandpaper. It was the reason for having to redo the video for the third time. The fine sandpaper took off to much of the small details in the coin and made it look fake. 320 grit is all I would recommend using for coins. The other steps take care of all the other imperfections the process creates. Try and preserve as much of the coin as possible. Always try and rub the coin with another soft coin to find out if you have done enough sanding. You will be amazed how quickly you can get a quiet coin.

Also start with the most soft coin you can. It will make the process much quicker and you will have a better end result.

Will post any other ideas when they come up. And if any others have any better ideas for this process, please feel free to post.
"I do not know with what weapons World War 3 will be fought, but World War 4 will be fought with sticks and stones." - Einstein
itlust
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Nice video!!
But I don't have the guts to do it Smile
is it fine using dremel to soften the coin ?
I'm always afraid the dremel took off too much detail and leave scratches in the coin
ottphd
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Thanks Bradley
You can read how to do it but to see it done makes a big difference. Thanks for taking the time to make the video. This will help a lot of people!
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Randy
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Thanks Brad

I think you can get the same results by dipping the coins in Duff's wing sauce

One question - in the video you mentioned that you stepped through 3 grits of sandpaper but you only specifically mention 320 grit. What grits do you use?
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Randy
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Another question

Where did you get the Blacken-It?

Is it available in hobby stores like Hobby Lobby or did you need to order it online?

Thanks again
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Dr_J_Ayala
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That was a most excellent video - coming from someone who does not need to do this for any of my coins because they are already there. This video is useful for anyone because it starts in step one and takes you all the way through the end, giving you pretty much every bit of info as you will need to accomplish this task. As ottphd said above, you can read about how to do it, but seeing it done makes a difference. Very true.

Great job and thank you for sharing!
Bradley Morgan
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Quote:
On 2012-02-21 08:43, itlust wrote:
is it fine using dremel to soften the coin ?
I'm always afraid the dremel took off too much detail and leave scratches in the coin


As far has I have noticed in the steps that I do it works very well. It doesn't really leave scratches but takes off anything, like natural patina, that is on the coin but smoothes out the inner small details of the coin. Basically rounding the edges of the letters and details of the coin.
That is why you have to artificially put back some wear and patina in the coin to make it look normal again. I hope that answers your question.


Quote:
On 2012-02-21 11:38, Randy wrote:
I think you can get the same results by dipping the coins in Duff's wing sauce

One question - in the video you mentioned that you stepped through 3 grits of sandpaper but you only specifically mention 320 grit. What grits do you use?


that's interesting, I have also tried Bleach and it leaves a nice black reaction on silver coins. But I don't know how it says on the coins after long use. Blacken-It has very little comes off in the course of the first few weeks of working the coins in. After that I havnt noticed anything coming off.

To address using more than one grit, that was before I reshot some of the sequences and must have missed that part in editing. I addressed the issue above in one of my posts about what grit to use.
But I Only use 320 grit that you can get in any normal Home Depot or alike store. It does its job but still maintains a roughness that you need to keep the coin looking natural.

The first time long ago, I lost everything to a hard drive crash.
Second time I used three different types of grit sandpaper and the result was not good. As I stated in an above post it came out to perfect and unnatural for an old coin. It must have look of and feel of a real old coin otherwise its just an expensive fake non-gimmicked coin.

I really want to push the fact that "Less Is More" don't go past what you don't need to. I have learnt this after doing 3 or 4 sets of Morgans and other coins.

Quote:
On 2012-02-21 11:45, Randy wrote:
Another question

Where did you get the Blacken-It?

Is it available in hobby stores like Hobby Lobby or did you need to order it online?

Thanks again


I have two local hobby stores that carry both the Blacken-It and Patina-It products. I have also found them on the net but I have never had to order them from there.
Even though with all my testings I have found to like this product the best for me.


Im glad people are finding it useful information. Im a true tinker kind of guy at heart and if I had the time to learn and build I would do everything. Everything is an art to me and there is always beauty in what man can do with his hands and his heart if its for a common good cause of all people.

I hope I answered everyones questions,

If anyone has any other thoughts and ideas please feel free to share.

Thanks again
"I do not know with what weapons World War 3 will be fought, but World War 4 will be fought with sticks and stones." - Einstein
Octopus Sun
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Your tek is so so...myself being a jeweler, I would never use 320 grit on my coins of any type, it is way too rough, you will scratch your coins real bad, and I mean bad, nasty bad. so friggin bad you will want to toss them or try to SELL them like someone here on the Café tried to do in the recent past.

use wet dry 600grit if you need to use sandpaper, then you shouuld buy some 2500grit pink polishing compound for your final polish with the dremel, and be extremely careful using a dremel with your coins or you will ruin them. Your coins will heat up very fast. so use your head and some extreme caution, goggles etc so you don't damage your eyes with buffing compounds and lint.
HenrikHyldig
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I can't find the "Darken it" in denmark, but I found something else, it is "Oxylenoxyd". is it the same liquid with another name, or is it something that would be harmful to my coins?
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gillesA4
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A real and warm thanks, this tutorial is filled with nice little tips!Even if I too would use a thinner sand paper...but 320 may have another meaning in Belgium, we probably use a different scale!
As for the Blacken-it product, do you know if it is a liver sulphur based component? We don't have this brand available here, as you can imagine...
Thanks again!
Gilles
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ottphd
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Go on google and search for blacken-it and you should find if for sale, I did and found it.
Its made by A-West
Box 1144 Woodstock, Ga. 30188-1144
Lawrence O
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Nice tutorial. Congratulations
For the grinding I use the lid of a plastic Okito box.
For the finishing work, I'm using a 4 ways nail polishing file. The soft plastic helps me to be more precise (and doesn't take much longer) than the electric metallic brush and buffering tool.

Again: great video. Thanks
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Bradley Morgan
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Quote:
On 2012-02-21 19:36, Octopus Sun wrote:
Your tek is so so...myself being a jeweler, I would never use 320 grit on my coins of any type, it is way too rough, you will scratch your coins real bad, and I mean bad, nasty bad. so friggin bad you will want to toss them or try to SELL them like someone here on the Café tried to do in the recent past.

use wet dry 600grit if you need to use sandpaper, then you shouuld buy some 2500grit pink polishing compound for your final polish with the dremel, and be extremely careful using a dremel with your coins or you will ruin them.


Like I said, this is what I do to make my coins look the way I want them to. Im not a jeweler and have tried a bunch of different thing to achieve the natural look I'm going after. If you have a superior way of doing this I would love to see your video tutorial coming from an expert like yourself. I did not post this video to show my technique or skill because I don't really have a lot of that.

I have used 600 and 1500 grit paper and for me it did not have the look and feel I wanted. You have to try it out for yourself to find out whats the best for you.

320 grit is very hard and I use it for that purpose. I want to take down the coin fast without hitting the small details. You don't want your coins looking polished and smooth like jewelry. You want them to look like 100 year olds coins should, with lots of imperfections and smooth.

I would never use 320 grit just by itself, that would leave your coin scratched and ugly. But with the rest of the process that I do it all come together at the end.

Quote:
On 2012-02-21 19:36, Octopus Sun wrote:
Your coins will heat up very fast. so use your head and some extreme caution, goggles etc so you don't damage your eyes with buffing compounds and lint.


Cant stress that enough good point!


Quote:
On 2012-02-22 06:47, HenrikHyldig wrote:
I can't find the "Darken it" in denmark, but I found something else, it is "Oxylenoxyd". is it the same liquid with another name, or is it something that would be harmful to my coins?


Im sorry I don't know if its the same stuff.

Quote:
On 2012-02-22 09:37, gillesA4 wrote:
A real and warm thanks, this tutorial is filled with nice little tips!Even if I too would use a thinner sand paper...but 320 may have another meaning in Belgium, we probably use a different scale!
As for the Blacken-it product, do you know if it is a liver sulphur based component? We don't have this brand available here, as you can imagine...
Thanks again!
Gilles


I don't know if its a different scale or not but 320 grit is as fine as you can get here in a local hardware store.
I found this scale for reference,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandpaper

It says 320 grit is for Extra fine, start polishing of wood. Its pretty smooth paper.

The Blacken-It product only lists,
Denatured alcohol, selenious acid, die cuts copper, chloride/topper carbonate.



Here is a website that I fond with a tutorial on how they say to use the product.

http://www.swannysmodels.com/Blackenit.html

also another cool one,

http://rrmodelcraftsman.com/toolchest/cm......t_02.php

Here is a place that sells it online

http://www.micromark.com/Blacken-It-4-fl-oz,7267.html


don't know if that helps anyone. Sorry

Thanks again for the kind comments from everyone.
"I do not know with what weapons World War 3 will be fought, but World War 4 will be fought with sticks and stones." - Einstein
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