The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » War... (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3..10~11~12~13 [Next]
balducci
View Profile
Loyal user
Canada
230 Posts

Profile of balducci
Quote:
On 2012-07-15 23:26, mastermindreader wrote:

And, as tommy pointed out, almost everybody else keeps their money there so its kind of understood to be off-limits.

I guess maybe you're right: Mittens.
Make America Great Again! - Trump in 2020 ... "We're a capitalistic society. I go into business, I don't make it, I go bankrupt. They're not going to bail me out. I've been on welfare and food stamps. Did anyone help me? No." - Craig T. Nelson, actor.
Woland
View Profile
Special user
680 Posts

Profile of Woland
Quote:
It could be argued, for example, that WWI was a direct result of the American Civil War because that is where the Germans first got an example of the efficacy of trains in supplying and transporting troops.


Perhaps more to the point was the impression conveyed by European observers, that the terrible carnage resulting from Napoleonic-style assaults on positions fortified with mid-XIXth century technology, including rifled muskets that were far more deadly and at longer ranges than Napoleonic-era weapons, merely reflected American incompetence. They made the same mistakes half a century later, and with much greater loss of life, too.

I've read that the Kaiser and his High Command visited the Ringling Brothers' tent circus when it toured Germany, and were much impressed with the logistics techniques employed in setting up, taking down, and transporting the whole operation - by train. Annie Oakley was then appearing with the show, and as a tour de force of her incredible marksmanship, shot the asheds off the end of a cigarette held by the Kaiser. "I wish I'd missed," she supposedly later said. During the War, she did write the Kaiser a letter, asking for a second shot. Apparently he never replied.
mastermindreader
View Profile
V.I.P.
Seattle, WA
12589 Posts

Profile of mastermindreader
Quote:
The U.S. Civil war was an event that was unparalleled in the annals of military history. It was a revolution of warfare in itself. U.S. military minds re-wrote military strategy to encompass all aspects of modern technology developed in the private sector. The conflict hosted the first ever use of rail and water ways and armored ships over a larges area of military operations and redefined previous lessons of battlefield deployment.(1) Previously learned infantry tactics quickly proved to be disastrous. American Generals were forced to adapt and even abandon the lessons of antebellum military thought. The railway made armies mobile to a degree that was previously unimaginable. Their development completely altered the entire concept and strategy of managing armies. The civil war laid down lessons to be copied and learned for the up coming "Great War" in Europe. Along with lessons and tactics came the new emphasis on newer and modern units and an increased importance assigned to battlefield preparation and geography. Through observation of the federal military development European observers witnessed the importance of a solid industrialized infra structure supporting the warfront. The North showed the world how strong industry and support can offset valor and other military qualities. (2)European leaders learned from the civil war the proper employment of mass armies, railroads, telegraphs, armored ships, railway, artillery, refilling, and trenches.


http://www.civilwarhome.com/tacticalwarfare.htm
Woland
View Profile
Special user
680 Posts

Profile of Woland
Quote:
European leaders learned from the civil war the proper employment of mass armies, railroads, telegraphs, armored ships, railway, artillery, refilling, and trenches.


Not quite. They learned what to do, but they did not realize the implications of doing it.
mastermindreader
View Profile
V.I.P.
Seattle, WA
12589 Posts

Profile of mastermindreader
Argue with the guy who wrote the article. But I don't see where the article said anything about the implications. It just said they learned "the proper employment."
Woland
View Profile
Special user
680 Posts

Profile of Woland
Just look at the results in the field. It took the Europeans in WW1 years to learn the lessons of how to deal with a defense in depth using trenches and machine-guns.
mastermindreader
View Profile
V.I.P.
Seattle, WA
12589 Posts

Profile of mastermindreader
The only point I was making was that Europe observed the Civil War carefully and learned the lessons of the first war of the Industrial Age, which included the integral role played by railroads.
Dreadnought
View Profile
Special user
Athens, Georgia
836 Posts

Profile of Dreadnought
The modern European rail system still uses many of those same rail lines that were established in WW1.

Peace and Godspeed.
Peace

"Ave Maria gratia plena Dominus tecum..."

Scott

Would you do anything for the person you love?
Woland
View Profile
Special user
680 Posts

Profile of Woland
I understand, Bob. Buyt they didn't observe carefully enough, and didn't learn the futility of infantry attacks against entrenched positions until millions of men had died trying to do it. A young company commander on the German side, however, wrote an interesting book (Infanterie greift an) about the tactics which he and others improvised in 1918 in order to get around the difficulties.
landmark
View Profile
Inner circle
within a triangle
5015 Posts

Profile of landmark
Again, not a pacifist, but I agree with Glenn that violence begets violence. I thought it might be interesting to be reminded about this:

Quote:
1Adam knew his wife Eve intimately, and she conceived and gave birth to Cain. She said, "I have had a male child with the LORD's help."[26] 2Then she also gave birth to his brother Abel. Now Abel became a shepherd of a flock, but Cain cultivated the land. 3In the course of time Cain presented some of the land's produce as an offering to the LORD. 4And Abel also presented [an offering][27] — some of the firstborn of his flock and their fat portions.[28] The Lord had regard for Abel and his offering, 5but He did not have regard for Cain and his offering. Cain was furious, and he was downcast.[29] 6Then the LORD said to Cain, "Why are you furious? And why are you downcast?[30] 7If you do right, won't you be accepted? But if you do not do right, sin is crouching at the door. Its desire is for you, but you must master it." 8Cain said to his brother Abel, "Let's go out to the field."[31] And while they were in the field, Cain attacked his brother Abel and killed him.

— Genesis 4:1-8 (HCSB


Good to think about some of the origins of violence.
gdw
View Profile
Inner circle
4816 Posts

Profile of gdw
Then the LORD said to Cain, "Why are you furious? And why are you downcast?"

So much for that omniscience thing.
It's amazing, people will criticize you for "biting the hand that feeds you," while they're busy praising the hand that beats them.

"You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one."

I won't forget you Robert.
LobowolfXXX
View Profile
Inner circle
La Famiglia
1191 Posts

Profile of LobowolfXXX
I ask my students questions that I know the answers to all the time.
"Torture doesn't work" lol
Guess they forgot to tell Bill Buckley.

"...as we reason and love, we are able to hope. And hope enables us to resist those things that would enslave us."
gdw
View Profile
Inner circle
4816 Posts

Profile of gdw
Quote:
On 2012-07-19 21:51, LobowolfXXX wrote:
I ask my students questions that I know the answers to all the time.


Yes, but god expressed favour for Abel's offering, fully knowing what was going to happen. God is a Richard.
It's amazing, people will criticize you for "biting the hand that feeds you," while they're busy praising the hand that beats them.

"You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one."

I won't forget you Robert.
motown
View Profile
Inner circle
Atlanta by way of Detroit
5968 Posts

Profile of motown
Quote:
On 2012-07-14 17:13, mastermindreader wrote:
The First War aka "The War that Started all Wars," was fought approximately 2.5 million years ago in or around present day Ethiopia.

Little is known about it except that it was fought on a Thursday afternoon and had something to do with a stolen keeshka and a woman named Lucy who had been previously accused of playing "hide the keeshka" with members of a neighboring tribe.

The owner of the keeshka was never identified.

The historic event has been memorialized in song:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au_jJmsfdMs
Unfortunately the spelling of Kishka was not correct. Smile
"If you ever write anything about me after I'm gone, I will come back and haunt you."
– Karl Germain
landmark
View Profile
Inner circle
within a triangle
5015 Posts

Profile of landmark
Anyone want to address the jealousy question?
mastermindreader
View Profile
V.I.P.
Seattle, WA
12589 Posts

Profile of mastermindreader
Quote:
On 2012-07-19 22:32, motown wrote:
Quote:
On 2012-07-14 17:13, mastermindreader wrote:
The First War aka "The War that Started all Wars," was fought approximately 2.5 million years ago in or around present day Ethiopia.

Little is known about it except that it was fought on a Thursday afternoon and had something to do with a stolen keeshka and a woman named Lucy who had been previously accused of playing "hide the keeshka" with members of a neighboring tribe.

The owner of the keeshka was never identified.

The historic event has been memorialized in song:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au_jJmsfdMs
Unfortunately the spelling of Kishka was not correct. Smile


You know, I spelled it "Kishka" at first but then looked it up just to be sure. I found that in the original song title it was spelled "Keeshka."

Besides, the alternate spelling is more suitable to the illiterate nature of my story.Smile
ClintonMagus
View Profile
Inner circle
Southwestern Southeast
3999 Posts

Profile of ClintonMagus
Let's have a war over the spelling of kishka/keeshka...
Things are more like they are today than they've ever been before...
Dreadnought
View Profile
Special user
Athens, Georgia
836 Posts

Profile of Dreadnought
Quote:
On 2012-07-19 22:11, gdw wrote:
Quote:
On 2012-07-19 21:51, LobowolfXXX wrote:
I ask my students questions that I know the answers to all the time.


Yes, but god expressed favour for Abel's offering, fully knowing what was going to happen. God is a Richard.


I hate doing this, so, I'm leaving it with just this response. Respond however you like, as you'll pretty much will disagree with everything said. First, your response has nothing to do with Lobo's statement regarding him asking his students questions he already knows the answer to. This is called the Socratic method of teaching. It is seen in both private and public schools, colleges and universities, in the work place and in the Bible.

Secondly, God knew what will happen as would any person but that does not trump free will. If I put a piece of chocolate cake and a plate of spinach in front of my child, I know, beyond the shadow of any doubt, what her choice will be - the chocolate cake is history. My knowing this ahead of time does not restrict her from exercising her freewill and making a free choice in the matter. There is always an element of surprise in the situation.

Peace and Godspeed.
Peace

"Ave Maria gratia plena Dominus tecum..."

Scott

Would you do anything for the person you love?
motown
View Profile
Inner circle
Atlanta by way of Detroit
5968 Posts

Profile of motown
Quote:
On 2012-07-20 10:57, mastermindreader wrote:
Quote:
On 2012-07-19 22:32, motown wrote:
Quote:
On 2012-07-14 17:13, mastermindreader wrote:
The First War aka "The War that Started all Wars," was fought approximately 2.5 million years ago in or around present day Ethiopia.

Little is known about it except that it was fought on a Thursday afternoon and had something to do with a stolen keeshka and a woman named Lucy who had been previously accused of playing "hide the keeshka" with members of a neighboring tribe.

The owner of the keeshka was never identified.

The historic event has been memorialized in song:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au_jJmsfdMs
Unfortunately the spelling of Kishka was not correct. Smile


You know, I spelled it "Kishka" at first but then looked it up just to be sure. I found that in the original song title it was spelled "Keeshka."

Besides, the alternate spelling is more suitable to the illiterate nature of my story.Smile
Bob, I was referring to the original song, that it was spelled incorrect. You were correct in you reference.
"If you ever write anything about me after I'm gone, I will come back and haunt you."
– Karl Germain
landmark
View Profile
Inner circle
within a triangle
5015 Posts

Profile of landmark
Written by Two-Time Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient

Major General Smedley D. Butler

USMC, Retired

Quote:
WAR IS A RACKET

WAR is a racket. It always has been.

It is possibly the oldest, easily the most profitable, surely the most vicious. It is the only one international in scope. It is the only one in which the profits are reckoned in dollars and the losses in lives.

A racket is best described, I believe, as something that is not what it seems to the majority of the people. Only a small "inside" group knows what it is about. It is conducted for the benefit of the very few, at the expense of the very many. Out of war a few people make huge fortunes.

In the World War [I] a mere handful garnered the profits of the conflict. At least 21,000 new millionaires and billionaires were made in the United States during the World War. That many admitted their huge blood gains in their income tax returns. How many other war millionaires falsified their tax returns no one knows.

How many of these war millionaires shouldered a rifle? How many of them dug a trench? How many of them knew what it meant to go hungry in a rat-infested dug-out? How many of them spent sleepless, frightened nights, ducking shells and shrapnel and machine gun bullets? How many of them parried a bayonet thrust of an enemy? How many of them were wounded or killed in battle?

Out of war nations acquire additional territory, if they are victorious. They just take it. This newly acquired territory promptly is exploited by the few – the selfsame few who wrung dollars out of blood in the war. The general public shoulders the bill.

And what is this bill?

This bill renders a horrible accounting. Newly placed gravestones. Mangled bodies. Shattered minds. Broken hearts and homes. Economic instability. Depression and all its attendant miseries. Back-breaking taxation for generations and generations.

For a great many years, as a soldier, I had a suspicion that war was a racket; not until I retired to civil life did I fully realize it. Now that I see the international war clouds gathering, as they are today, I must face it and speak out.

Again they are choosing sides.


More here.
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » War... (0 Likes)
 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3..10~11~12~13 [Next]
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2021 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.27 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL