The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » Old (Military) Habits Die Hard (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3~4~5
MagicSanta
View Profile
Inner circle
Northern Nevada
5845 Posts

Profile of MagicSanta
You can get property cheap as heck but mines and warehouse jobs are about it but ten acres with a home for 20 grand or less and new houses for $150k or less. We have wild horses, a lake a mile away, river, hunting if that is your thing, and a veteran friendly population. I am planning on leaving because my wifes death has effected me badly and I am losing it mentally I think. Other than commitments to seniors and helping the people apply for food stamps etc I have been in seclusion. I am a bit off at the moment because I just got off the phone about mt wifes grave marker and it has me upset.
General_Magician
View Profile
Special user
United States
707 Posts

Profile of General_Magician
Quote:
On 2012-07-26 18:45, MagicSanta wrote:
You can get property cheap as heck but mines and warehouse jobs are about it but ten acres with a home for 20 grand or less and new houses for $150k or less. We have wild horses, a lake a mile away, river, hunting if that is your thing, and a veteran friendly population. I am planning on leaving because my wifes death has effected me badly and I am losing it mentally I think. Other than commitments to seniors and helping the people apply for food stamps etc I have been in seclusion. I am a bit off at the moment because I just got off the phone about mt wifes grave marker and it has me upset.


Here is my number: (478) 213-3991. Name is William Davenport. Call me anytime when you need to talk. Vets don't leave vets behind. We help each other out and I got your back. Just call anytime you need somebody to talk to. Like I said, I would jump on a gernade for you. That's how it is in the infantry after being in combat for awhile. We fight for each other first. The best way to get home alive is to look out for one another. I am looking out for you and you are not alone my fellow vet.
"Never fear shadows. They simply mean there is a light shining somewhere nearby." -unknown

Company Website
Facebook Business Page
Twitter Business Page
MagicSanta
View Profile
Inner circle
Northern Nevada
5845 Posts

Profile of MagicSanta
Thank you
General_Magician
View Profile
Special user
United States
707 Posts

Profile of General_Magician
Quote:
On 2012-07-26 21:27, MagicSanta wrote:
Thank you


Anytime. I am serious about my offer. Just call anytime you need somebody to talk to. I would also get yourself a dog. A German Shepherd is a good choice in my opinion. German Shepherds are the third most intelligent dogs, one of the easiest to train in obdience and to train in general. Plus, so long as they are socialized properly and treated well by their owners, they are great around people AND they make good watch dogs for your house and property. They are very protective and loyal to you, especially if you raise them up yourself starting when they are a puppy. Dogs are awesome and give back to you in many ways. Try to also get back into performing magic. This will help you.

It helped me a lot when I returned home from Afghanistan. It was a very tough process (and sometimes still is), but performing magic helped me out a lot, kept me going and helps to heal. It just does something for you when you watch people light up with amazement with a magic trick and you get a chance to talk with people.

It got me out of my cacoon. It's pretty common for some combat vets to go into a cacoon when they get back and not get out much. I went into a cacoon and was afraid to socialize with civilians, but magic helped me get out more and to heal and be able to talk to people more (especially civilians). The art of magic bridges a lot of gaps.

So, get back into performing and get a good dog. But you will have to put work into the dog and pay vetinarian bills and maybe drop him off at a pet care place when you have to go somewhere on a long trip or something but dogs do give back to you and help you to be happier. You also get out of a dog what you put into a dog, just like a business. You get out of a business what you put into a business. A dog helped to save the life of one of the soldiers in my brigade from a sucide bomber. I also saw on an Animal Planet TV show where one of the vets who served in Iraq brought a dog back from that place.

PS- One last, thing, quick edit here. The VA offers service dogs to some disabled vets. I know some of my fellow vets have service dogs that they got through the VA (I think some of the vets who got them were diagnosed with PTSD and got a service dog, but don't quote me on that as I am not 100% sure, but I can find out). I believe these dogs already come very well trained. Given that you are a disabled vet, you might qualify for a service dog. If you need me to get you some more information, I will be glad to do that for you.
"Never fear shadows. They simply mean there is a light shining somewhere nearby." -unknown

Company Website
Facebook Business Page
Twitter Business Page
MagicSanta
View Profile
Inner circle
Northern Nevada
5845 Posts

Profile of MagicSanta
If not for my dogs I would go nuts. I was down before because I didn't realize the date. My wife died one month ago almost to the minute. Now I am a bummer.
Devious
View Profile
Inner circle
2120 Posts

Profile of Devious
It's very good to see you posting around here again Mr. Davenport.
We sure did toss back those pm's back and forth a while back eh?

Thank you for your service once again Brother!
Devious Deceptions
"Gadol Elohai!"
L'Chaim!
General_Magician
View Profile
Special user
United States
707 Posts

Profile of General_Magician
Quote:
On 2012-07-27 01:43, Devious wrote:
It's very good to see you posting around here again Mr. Davenport.
We sure did toss back those pm's back and forth a while back eh?

Thank you for your service once again Brother!


Thank you Devious! Yes we did! Thank you for your service as well! I love your website. You have an awesome blog and website! How have you been doing?
"Never fear shadows. They simply mean there is a light shining somewhere nearby." -unknown

Company Website
Facebook Business Page
Twitter Business Page
rowdymagi5
View Profile
Inner circle
Virginia
3262 Posts

Profile of rowdymagi5
I brought up the boot laces and I was talking about literally combat boots and lacing them up. We were taught it is left over right. There is no other way, it had to be left over right and they were checked! To this day, that is how I do any laces whether it be work boots or tennis shoes.

I had no idea there was any correlation to my statement and suicide. That is not something I would joke about.

Just wanted to set the record straight.
General_Magician
View Profile
Special user
United States
707 Posts

Profile of General_Magician
Quote:
On 2012-07-27 08:20, rowdymagi5 wrote:
I brought up the boot laces and I was talking about literally combat boots and lacing them up. We were taught it is left over right. There is no other way, it had to be left over right and they were checked! To this day, that is how I do any laces whether it be work boots or tennis shoes.

I had no idea there was any correlation to my statement and suicide. That is not something I would joke about.

Just wanted to set the record straight.


It's OK, I understand. I personally don't remember being taught by the drill sergents how to lace boots, though they would at times use some guys who had ROTC experience to help teach some of the basics. To me, it just seems like common sense on how to lace and tie your boots. It's like giving a class on common sense (but then again the military has been known to do that because a lot of things seem to go against common sense in the military, especially in garrison when you are not out in the field). I guess that's why they say the inspection ready unit never passes combat and the combat ready unit never passes inspection under Murphy's Laws of Combat.

Kinda like teaching a grown man how to tie his shoes (or in most cases people in basic training are young, probably between the ages of 18-25, sometimes much older, but still should know how to tie their shoes). You shouldn't have to teach a grown man how to his shoes! Why would you need to teach a grown man how to tie his boots? It's just common sense!

I went to basic at Fort Knox, KY, which, at the time was where armor crewmen were trained on the M1 Abrams tanks (I hear it's Fort Benning now, plus tanker boots were a big thing back then, which, they don't have boot laces, but we were initially issued combat boots with boot laces and not tanker boots and tanker boots were something you had to buy on your own out of your own pocket after you graduated your training). Marine tankers were trained there at Fort Knox at the time as well. We had hills called Pain, Agony and Misery which we would road march on at the time.

No, I am not sucidal or anything crazy like that. So, I want to set the record straight as well. I just heard some horror stories of when I was in basic of some basic trainees or people in the military being sucidal and having their boot laces taken from them and being put on sucide watch.
"Never fear shadows. They simply mean there is a light shining somewhere nearby." -unknown

Company Website
Facebook Business Page
Twitter Business Page
rowdymagi5
View Profile
Inner circle
Virginia
3262 Posts

Profile of rowdymagi5
Here is what we were taught, there are two ways to do things, there is the civilian way and there is the Marine way. I know a lot has changed since I was in, but back then, they broke you down and built you back up. We were taught how to shower, how to shave, how to walk, how to talk, you get the picture. Everything was to be perfect.

Ahhh, those were the days!
MagicSanta
View Profile
Inner circle
Northern Nevada
5845 Posts

Profile of MagicSanta
Poor Marines. When I got to San Diego there was a dozen of us squid larva with one fellow telling us loudly what horrible subhumans we were, this was in the airport with real humans walking around watching us. There was one kid on the plane with us heading to Marine boot. He stood by himself as four drill sgts boxed him in and from six inches away informed him at top volume how happy he would be in boot camp.

A civilian walked by and yelled to us "you'll be sooorrrrrry"
General_Magician
View Profile
Special user
United States
707 Posts

Profile of General_Magician
Here is a great article from military.com about war dogs: http://www.military.com/daily-news/2012/......0&rank=1 Heck, by reading the article, it would seem that even war dogs come down with PTSD.
"Never fear shadows. They simply mean there is a light shining somewhere nearby." -unknown

Company Website
Facebook Business Page
Twitter Business Page
Dreadnought
View Profile
Special user
Athens, Georgia
836 Posts

Profile of Dreadnought
Don't mean to beat a dead horse, but the boot lace thing is left over right for both boots in basic and for main-stream personnel, it's for uniformity sake. But it is really left over right on the left foot and right over left on the right foot as that provides more ankle support for the outside ankles as most ankle injuries (military) are from twisting the ankle to the outside especially when carrying heavy loads.

Peace and Godspeed.
Peace

"Ave Maria gratia plena Dominus tecum..."

Scott

Would you do anything for the person you love?
MagicSanta
View Profile
Inner circle
Northern Nevada
5845 Posts

Profile of MagicSanta
Thank you, makes sense.
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » Old (Military) Habits Die Hard (0 Likes)
 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3~4~5
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2021 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.2 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL