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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Once upon a time... » » What Are Your Thoughts: "Grandfather Stories" (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Autumn Morning Star
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(I also posted this in the "Bizarre" section, because storytelling is frequently used in bizarre magic!)
I have searched everywhere for specific reviews of the book "Grandfather Stories - Magic with a Native American Flair" by Ed Solomon, but have not found anything that says more than: "It's a good book". Hey, I have a lot of "good books", but I want something that is a bit different.

Does anyone have this book? If so, do you use any stories and ideas from within these pages? Tell me more! How about an honest review
Thanks!
Wonder is very necessary in life. When we're little kids, we're filled with wonder for the world - it's fascinating and miraculous. A lot of people lose that. They become cynical and jaded, especially in modern day society. Magic renews that wonder.
Doug Henning
Lawrence O
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Are you sure that stories starting with "my grandfather..." (or grandmother) are that appealing to auciences?

Now for American magicians, because I'm interested in the symbolism in religions, as I travelled all over the United States, I visited several native Indian reservations. Many tribes have their legends consigned in short booklets for the transmission of their culture: not only are these fairly deep and symbolical, but they are generally very colorful and easy to adapt to a magic story. So why not using American Indians ancesters' stories rather than "my grandfather" type of story (even if they need to be slightly distorted for magical purposes)?
Magic is the art of proving impossible things in parallel dimensions that can't be reached
Autumn Morning Star
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Hi Lawrence,
Thank you for your reply and your suggestions! This is the name of a book: "Grandfather Stories" by Ed Solomon. These are American Indian in tone with magic effects worked in, but are not 'traditional' Native stories. I was just wanting some reviews to see what this book is about, as I have not read it. The stories do not begin with "my grandfather" and I agree with your observation. A bit of trivia you might find interesting: 'Grandfather' is actually a term of respect used by many different tribes for an elder male (sometimes a relative, sometimes not).

I am Blackfeet and Choctaw and I do use stories from my tribal nations for which I have permission to tell. There are many rules about the simple telling of a story, as to when the story is told, the time of year, time of day, and reason for telling. These traditions are complex, so I have to be respectful and careful.

I don't use stories from other nations, unless they are 'given' to me by someone from that tribal Nation. Many of the stories you see in books are taken from the storyteller and tribe and usually without permission. (If you notice, most of these books are published by non-Indian anthropologists, educational institutions, and other non-Indian collectors.)

I posted this same inquiry in another location and did get some great reviews of the book. If anyone is interested please check this out: http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......forum=14

UPDATE: I received an electronic copy of this book and am currently reading it. (Thanks Ed Solomon for your generosity!) I will be able to give a good review as soon as I finish!
Wonder is very necessary in life. When we're little kids, we're filled with wonder for the world - it's fascinating and miraculous. A lot of people lose that. They become cynical and jaded, especially in modern day society. Magic renews that wonder.
Doug Henning
David Eichler
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Autumn,

I am curious about your above posting. Two friends of mine, both now have crossed the threshold, at different times gave me copies of their books containing stories from their own lives and/or the oral histories within their tribal Nations. One grew up on the Tuscarora Indian Reservation and the other was from one of the Five first Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy. Both had said, in giving me the book, that these were stories they had written so that they could be shared with others (one of them wrote in the introduction to all, "I give it [the stories in the book] to you now as it was intended, a gift..for listening ears.") Would this, in your opinion, be considered being 'given' to one by a member of that tribal Nation? I have no intent to do so - it is not from my lineage to share - but I am wondering more about the broader interpretation of the ethics involved.

With warm regards,

David
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