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JamesinLA
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Hey, guys, I'm building a new illusion and going to use loose pin hinges to put it together. Never used loose pin hinges before. Can anyone recommend what size and any particular type of hinges to use to conver to loose pin hinges? Thanks.

Jim
Oh, my friend we're older but no wiser, for in our hearts the dreams are still the same...
Bill Hegbli
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You should buy butt hinges. Some hinges the pin will not be able to be removed. So you have to look for one you can remove.

There is large wire pin found at hardware stores that can replace the pin removed. They come in various sizes. They are used to put in the end of pin that has a hole in it. The wire pin locks the pin and prevents it from falling out or working out.
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Michael Baker
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To see what Bill is refering to, look up images for clevis pin. They generally come with what is called a hair pin or clip. That pin is what you can use in place of the hinge pin. If you look up hair pin though, you'll get all kinds of things you don't need.

You can take the pin out of any kind of hinge, but some have been pounded over like a rivet, so you'll have to grind one end off first. Then, knock the pin free using a hammer and nail punch or even a nail that is smaller diameter. You can get it started out one end, then usually pull it free with pliers.

For most things that I make for myself that pin hinge together, I just cut some coat hanger wire, and bend one end 90 degrees. If the wire is too much smaller in diameter, it will make a sloppy fit with too much play in the hinge. So try to find a wire that is close in size the what came out of the hinge. Sometimes, I will put a slight bend in that wire, so when it goes in the hinge barrel, it sort of locks in by friction.

The nice thing about coat hanger wire pins is that you can make a tone of them for nothing and just keep a bag of them on hand in case you lose some.
~michael baker
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JamesinLA
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Thanks, gentlemen. I have noticed the difference between the hinges that have removable vs. non-removable pins. I thought I could hacksaw off one end of a pin if need be. Is there a sweet spot in terms of the size of hinge you would recommend for using this method to put illusions together?

Jim
Oh, my friend we're older but no wiser, for in our hearts the dreams are still the same...
markofmagic
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I remove the hinge pin and then drill out the hinge with next size drill bit and then the pin will slide in out easly while still holding the two halves of the hinge secure
Michael Baker
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Quote:
On 2013-01-15 11:36, markofmagic wrote:
I remove the hinge pin and then drill out the hinge with next size drill bit and then the pin will slide in out easly while still holding the two halves of the hinge secure


That's a pretty good idea!

Regarding James' question about the size of the hinge... that will depend on its use. I have used smaller hinges, say 1 1/2" x 2" to hold walls of a doll house together, But have also used regular door hinges to secure the swinging sides of a Blammo Box. Just think about the amount of stress the joint will be under during use.

Regarding how to open up the end of a tight pin hinge... you are better to grind off the end of the pin than sawing. Sometimes in sawing, the pin will rotate and you'll spend a lot of time doing nothing but exhausting your arm. Most times, I will grab the hinge with a vice grips and run the end on a belt sander, but you can do the same with a Dremel. Hinges with removable pins (sometimes called loose pin hinges) are available in some sizes, but not all.

One other thing... if you can find info on it, there is a type of modified hinge that I believe is called a Blackstone hinge. It is an intereting design that if I recall, eliminates the need for separate pins, while still allowing the hinge to come apart. It is in print somewhere, but I would have to dig to figure out where I may have seen that.
~michael baker
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freefallillusion1
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Michael,

The Blackstone hinge is in Jim Sommers' "Build your own illusions".
Michael Baker
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Quote:
Michael,

The Blackstone hinge is in Jim Sommers' "Build your own illusions".


Bingo! I also just found it in "The New Make-Up of Magic", by Mickey Hades.
~michael baker
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JamesinLA
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Yeah, I've seen the Blackstone hinge in the Jim Sommer's book. Thanks for thinking of that Michael. I'm not going to use it this time around since the show I'm going to use this illusion for is April (and most of time is consumed with filling hte seats.) But I'll look in the book to see what size the blackstone hinge is!

BTW, the illusion I'm building and will be using the pin hinges for is a mummy case.

Jim
Oh, my friend we're older but no wiser, for in our hearts the dreams are still the same...
Michael Baker
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Just make sure that the screws you attach the hinges with, bite a lot of wood, or you can even use rivets with back-up plates. One thing that will help is to minimize the slop in the hinge by making sure the pins are as tight as you can manage. Try to make the joints tight, as this will reduce the change of torque stress on everything. Too much play will cause the panels to act like levers, putting all the force on the hinge barrels or the screws. Enough of that and things can easily break.
~michael baker
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JamesinLA
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Good tip! I often use 10/32 bolts in leu of screws when I can with little lock washers.

Jim
Oh, my friend we're older but no wiser, for in our hearts the dreams are still the same...
Thom Bliss
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Three things I've learned about using loose pin hinges:

(1) If they won't be seen, you can make a loop at the top of the wire replacement pin, then run some string or ribbon (or bias tape) through the loop and secure the other end to one of the things the hinge holds. That way they aren't going to get lost.

(2) Keep plenty of spare pins with you. They have a way of getting lost.

(3) A small hammer and smaller pair of pliers may prove useful in removing the replacement pins.

Thom
.
Michael Baker
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Quote:
On 2013-01-15 23:11, Thom Bliss wrote:
Three things I've learned about using loose pin hinges:

(1) If they won't be seen, you can make a loop at the top of the wire replacement pin, then run some string or ribbon (or bias tape) through the loop and secure the other end to one of the things the hinge holds. That way they aren't going to get lost.

(2) Keep plenty of spare pins with you. They have a way of getting lost.

(3) A small hammer and smaller pair of pliers may prove useful in removing the replacement pins.

Thom
.


Ha-ha!! After reading (1) on your list, (2) should just read: "Murphy's Law".

That made me laugh!!
~michael baker
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magicjohn2278
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Isle of Man UK
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You can buy loose pin hinges, or just file the end off a standard hinge and drive out the pin. Even with bought pin hinges, I discard the pins supplied and replace them with "r clips" which I find are easier to assemble. (And being sprung, won't accidentally fall out and can be "stored" in one half of the hinge.) Google "r clips".
hugmagic
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Coat hangers are always available! I was waiting to see before someone called them Blackstone hinges. That is the way I have always known them.

Richard
Richard E. Hughes, Hughes Magic Inc., 352 N. Prospect St., Ravenna, OH 44266 (330)296-4023
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gadfly3d
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I just replaced the pin with nail

Gil Scott
David Garrity
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seforeman
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Love this site, you always find something you did not know. Thanks for the link.

Stu,
Stuart Foreman
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