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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workers » » Little advice on books (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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bidbid
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Harry Lorayne have some really high quality books.
Magic-Scott
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Tarbell, Dear Mr Fantasy, Smoke & Mirrors, Stars of Magic, any Lorayne book....
drumdemon420
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I might catch some flack for this since they weren't on your list but I love them. I still say that the Art of Astonishment series is amazing. The stuff is approachable and whimsical. There is cards, coins, gaffs, silly putty, to a *** Beenie Weenie can! Lots more as well. They are a blast to read to boot! Did I mention essays/funny stories? I should have. I STILL perform this stuff for friends and family when asked to "do something."

Concerning Darwin Ortiz's material. I almost never perform that material. There ARE exceptions, Mexican Poker is one. It really does kill. Sure, I don't perform his material often but that says NOTHING about how good the material really is. His material is fantastic and his thoughts on the subject are nothing short of eye opening. He is merely far better than I ever hope to be. Even if you never perform a single trick by Mr. Ortiz his thoughts on the logic of his tricks are worth the price of his books alone. Also, his touches on certain moves you already know are incredibly valuable.

Just my two cents,
Justin
foolsnobody
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I am incredulous that in a thread of recommendations of magic books to a man who is mostly into cards, there has been but one mention of Marlo, i.e., Marlo in Spades. I didn't even see the Cardician mentioned; did I miss it? Also RCT and all the individual pamphlets put out by Magic Inc., plus all of Racherbaumer who was a Marlophile and published a lot of his work, plus Marlo's private publications from Riffle Shuffle Systems to Volumes I-VI of Marlo's Magazine at over 300 pages each (if you can ever afford them). Everybody loves Bannon here. Well he has put out some terrific stuff, for sure. But I met Ed Marlo in Chicago while Bannon was still in law school. I met Bill Malone and Art Altman and Dave Solomon and Simon Aronson and Don England at Schuliens and at the Saturday afternoon session near Magic Inc. Later I met Allan Ackerman who studied with Marlo. Ask Bannon about Marlo! I honestly cannot believe this! Heck, ask Harry Lorayne about Marlo! To leave Marlo out of a list of recommendations like this is unconscionable. Ask freakin' Roy Walton his opinion of Marlo. Lord have mercy. If Marlo's stuff was all extremely difficult knucklebusting stuff I could see not suggesting him to Charlie--yet. But Marlo has a ton of easy material, or intermediate material, as well as the tough stuff. How about Marlo Without Tears? Tough to get a hold of now but worth the effort.

None of those Chicago guys are in awe of or sycophantic followers of Marlo any more. They see his flaws. But they also see what he contributed to card magic in the 20th century. Any of them will tell you. But to get the most out of Marlo you have to immerse yourself in his total work to experience his vast card magic mind. Marlo, Vernon, and Lorayne. And their students and disciples. You have to experience the sources of modern card magic directly.
Alewishus
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Marlo Without Tears had me in tears - it kinda sucks.


A.
Sack subs, ok Ross?
We miss you asper.
Magic-Scott
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Classic Secrets of Magic by Bruce Elliot - Another great one that has a variety of magic in it and can be picked up at a reasonable price...
Atom3339
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^ foolsnobody, Excellent reminder of Marlo's contributions. IMO, MOST magicians ASSUME Marlo's material is too difficult. MOST are too lazy to "dig"; to dig through his material to see what suits them and what they can handle.

Another thing that surprises me, but I've found true, is that MANY of this generation's magicians have never heard of Marlo! A big shame.

It hasn't helped that conversations regarding Marlo hover around questionable topics, in particular crediting originators----which is actually COMMON amongst creators.

And there seems to be a line of demarcation between Marlo and Dai Vernon. It seems one should be associated with one school or the other. Though it has also been pointed out that The Professor had his quirks and faults YET cardicians worship him like a demi-god.

Personally, I prefer Marlo's material be kept secret as I am learning more about Card Magic by absorbing his contributions than ever before.

Shhhhh!

Good call, Sir!
TH

Occupy Your Dream
Vlad_77
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I never got the whole Marlo versus Vernon thing. Actually, the two had met several times according to literature I have read and admired each other's work. As such, I don't perceive a "school" as such as both men are legends of the art.

One difference however is textual density. Vernon's books were written by writers such as Lewis Ganson and Stephen Minch and as such, reflect the cleaner prose - especially Stephen Minch - of a writer. Marlo wrote most of his books and he was an obsessive note keeper and chronicler of effects and methods. Marlo's prose is more technical in nature and some magicians feel intimidated by that. Both Marlo and Vernon produced some very difficult material but each also created a huge amount of magic for those less than immortal.

Respectfully Alewishus, I have to disagree with you about Marlo Without Tears. I think Jon Racherbaumer did a nice job writing it. Yes there are problems with the book but it's not an awful book by any stretch of the imagination. That said, if it doesn't work for you, that's valid. I never got that sense of "wow" with David Harkey's book Simply Harkey even though he is a fine magician. It is the one book in my library that I have read a number of times and do not like, and the only book I have considered selling. But, perhaps I just need to try it again in future. Maybe it's the same with you and the Marlo book? I will concede that Marlo Without Tears is not the best introduction to Marlo's work. RCT and the two M.I.N.T. volumes are perhaps the best way to dive into Marlo's work IMHO.

Best,
Vlad
Robert P.
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So foolsnobody, so if I'm understanding you correctly you're saying that Ed Marlo has some pretty nice contributions out there? Smile I have many of Marlo's books and I love them though I need to read them more. Marlo's Miracle Routine from his Marlo in Spades booklet (and in Cardially Yours) is fantastic. Sal Piacente also has a very nice variation on his Expert Lecture Notes DVDs, which I HIGHLY recommend. I just started watching Bill Malones DVD series on Marlo's material and I love the history he gives on Marlo in the beginning.

I'd be interested to see what the OP (CharliePA) decided on since time has passed and he has probably made a decision since then. But I'd agree with Atom3339 and read what you have...while saving up for Apocalypse.

Looking at the OP's list, my recommendations would have been:

John Bannon's Dear Mr. Fantasy or Smoke and Mirrors
Harry Lorayne's Apocalypse set, Classic Collections and Best of Friends series
Card College
Card Magic of Nick Trost
Ken Weber's Maximum Entertainment (I don't perform professionally yet I still consider this a must read)

Other great books have been mentioned but to me, these are some of my favorites.

Oh and don't forget to pick up The Amateur Magician's Handbook by Henry Hay. You can get it on the cheap and it has some great information in there, including presentation. Don't believe me, just do a search on it here in the Café, mentalist Bob Cassidy also is a big fan of it.
rynku
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Art of astonishment is a great book,

expert card technique is also gold..


Best Regards,




Rynku Viceroy
seraph127
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Good to see other Marlo fans out and about. I think most anyone who is fond of cards might like Magic Inc.'s Cardially Yours, Ed Marlo. It's a compilation of Marlo's first four books, along with Off the Top, Let's See the Deck and two books widely regarded as Marlo's best: Marlo In Spades and The Cardician. It's a treasure vault of workers and most of it is within the capabilities of the mere mortal.
There are many tricks, and many effects, but rarely a Grand Effect. There are many entertainers, but few real magicians. Many technicians, but few artists who use their art to explore their vision. - Derren Brown, Absolute Magic
MagicTobe
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For what you are looking for, in my opinion, Stars of Magic is the book that best fits your demand.
ShirtlessKirk
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Quote:
On 2013-08-09 03:46, Alewishus wrote:
Marlo Without Tears had me in tears - it kinda sucks.


A.


There is a think a card along the lines of out of sight out of mind in that book that is excellent. You never look at the cards. It's not the best marlo book but there is some good material in there.
foolsnobody
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Elsewhere in the Café I have written about Ed Marlo's kindness to me and I don't want to repeat myself here. When someone of that caliber in any field goes out of his way for you, you owe him even though you can never repay him. I feel much the same way about Clarke "The Senator" Crandall.

I kind of agree with Alewishus on the "Tears" book. I enjoyed it more at first but after a while many of the effects seemed more ingenious than strong. And unlike seraph127 I did not like the first four Marlo pamphlets put out by Magic Inc. that much, and even the Spade Book left me a little cold. Where I found Marlo was in the Racherbaumer publications and later in the private manuscripts, *especially* the Marlo Magazines Vol. 1, 2, and 3. I had all 6 but lost them in a move and decided not to replace them because with the numbness in my fingertips I could no longer do the material justice.

I happen to enjoy effects with a little bit of whimsy and almost absurdity. If you were not around in the era when everybody and his brother was doing the 21 card trick for everyone and his brother, you would find it hard to see the appeal of a multi-phase 21 card trick utilizing different methods for each phase and with none of the phases resembling the 21 card trick "everybody" knew.

If you weren't around when the piano trick was popular, Marlo's "Piano Duet" from, I believe, Volume 2 of the Magazine would mean nothing to you. But to me it was not only an improvement on the original effect, but a brilliant piece of magic thinking as well, such as when he points out how he handles a spectator who figures out the method.

There are lots of different aspects to Marlo. He was the consumate cardician, from A to Z. Self-workers to knucklbusters. And he had a delightful DRY sense of humor. REALLY funny in his quiet and low-key way.
seraph127
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I only found a couple of items that I liked in the "Early Marlo" set, but there were several items in "Spades" that I found very interesting - particularly "Marlo's Gambling Routine". If you can Faro at least the top half of the deck and do a convincing false cut, it's a good deal (and I don't ususally go for gambling-themes effects). Particularly if you do it after an Ace routine so that you can stick the aces back in and control them to the top. This saves a lot of setup headache. "Marlo's Triumph" is cute bit for those who only know the methods involving a strip-out (like the Vernon original).

In Solomon's Mind, Dave Solomon gives us a picture of both the good and bad facets of Marlo's Character. I've learned a lot from Marlo's work, yet I don't idolize him. I wish I could admire all the people from whose work I've benefitted, but it doesn't always work out that way.
There are many tricks, and many effects, but rarely a Grand Effect. There are many entertainers, but few real magicians. Many technicians, but few artists who use their art to explore their vision. - Derren Brown, Absolute Magic
JoeHohman
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I second Six's suggestions regarding ECT and LePaul. (But BOY, LePaul is hard.....)

I know this is a "beginner" book, but there are some really strong card items in Mark Wilson's Complete Course book. (And lots of other material besides.) None of them are hard, but they play well.... Just an idea, and it is well within your budget.
Steven Leung
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Quote:
On 2013-05-13 07:03, Jiceh wrote:
John Bannon's Dear Mr. Fantasy can be a good choise


Another vote for Dear Mister Fantasy, book of the year in 2005 if my memory is correct. One of the best book especially in card magic in my humble opinion.
Most memorable moment - with Maestro Juan Tamariz & Consuelo Lorgia in FISM Busan 2018.

"Being fooled by a trick doesn't always mean they are having a good time" - Homer Liwag

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