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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » The Great Depression v The Great Depression (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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tommy
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Your opinions are all irrelevant and matter not a jot. The question is matter of fact. None of you have provided one relevant fact, with the exception Pop and myself. JoeJoe states “Some facts: the odds of being killed at the hands of another human are at an all time low. The odds dying from a disease or illness is at an all time low. The odds of dying from starvation is at an all time low.” What that has to do with the price of fish I don't know.
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

Tommy
Al Angello
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Danny
May we both live long enough to see the next republican living in the white house. Not just attending a state dinner mind you, but actually living in the white house as our fearless leader.
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Bob1Dog
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Quote:
On 2013-05-19 21:30, Al Angello wrote:
Danny
May we both live long enough to see the next republican living in the white house. Not just attending a state dinner mind you, but actually living in the white house as our fearless leader.

Al, I couldn't agree with you more my friend. It's just that sooner would be better than later.
What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about? Smile

My neighbor rang my doorbell at 2:30 a.m. this morning, can you believe that, 2:30 a.m.!? Lucky for him I was still up playing my drums.
Al Angello
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I'm with you Bob, but the real question is can the republicans move close enough to the center to be a viable contender for the presidency in our life time? It seems like such a stretch Bob that is just might be an unattainable goal in our short lifetime.
Al Angello The Comic Juggler/Magician
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"Footprints on your ceiling are almost gone"
Jonathan Townsend
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Check the free energy in the economic system then vs now. How was the infrastructure, availability of skilled labor and raw materials?
...to all the coins I've dropped here
JoeJoe
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Quote:
On 2013-05-19 21:16, tommy wrote:
JoeJoe states “Some facts: the odds of being killed at the hands of another human are at an all time low. The odds dying from a disease or illness is at an all time low. The odds of dying from starvation is at an all time low.” What that has to do with the price of fish I don't know.


It shows your ignorance on the matters Tommy; farmers produce more food today than any other point in human history, and adjusted for inflation food is cheaper than it ever has been. You can buy a fish sandwich for only $1 at McDonalds, what more could you ask for?? Sheesh.

-JoeJoe
Amazing JoeJoe on YouTube[url=https://www.youtube.com/user/AmazingJoeJoe]
Bob1Dog
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Quote:
On 2013-05-19 22:37, Al Angello wrote:
I'm with you Bob, but the real question is can the republicans move close enough to the center to be a viable contender for the presidency in our life time? It seems like such a stretch Bob that is just might be an unattainable goal in our short lifetime.

Al, I'll bet you a lunch in Rehoboth Beach that we'll both live to see a republican in the White House before one of us dies. If I lose by dying first and there is no Republican in the WH between now and then, you have my permission to make a claim on my estate to my heirs for the cost of lunch at the restaurant of your choice in Lewes or Rehoboth Beach. (I'd recommend The Buttery in Lewes)
What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about? Smile

My neighbor rang my doorbell at 2:30 a.m. this morning, can you believe that, 2:30 a.m.!? Lucky for him I was still up playing my drums.
Jonathan Townsend
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Quote:
On 2013-05-19 23:12, JoeJoe wrote:
Quote:
On 2013-05-19 21:16, tommy wrote:
JoeJoe states “Some facts: the odds of being killed at the hands of another human are at an all time low. The odds dying from a disease or illness is at an all time low. The odds of dying from starvation is at an all time low.” What that has to do with the price of fish I don't know.


It shows your ignorance on the matters Tommy; farmers produce more food today than any other point in human history, and adjusted for inflation food is cheaper than it ever has been. You can buy a fish sandwich for only $1 at McDonalds, what more could you ask for?? Sheesh.

-JoeJoe


Another customer for the Sugar, Fat and Salt book? How much for a nice loaf of non-pesticide grown whole wheat bread then vs now?
...to all the coins I've dropped here
tommy
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By the way. I provided facts for the purpose of comparing the old Great Depression
with this new Great Depression which we are in. I have not said this is a worse Depression or not. I merely asked the question whether it is or not.

1. 1930's Cost Of Living P.4 4/25/09 Bentley Tran
2. Cars An average car in the 1930's cost around $640. A Buick cost $825 dollars which had room for 2 to 4 passengers A Cadillac was a luxury car back then and the price ranged from $1500-$3000. A Chevrolet cost $500-$800 dollars for its safety and beauty. The Chrysler is also a luxury car for people who like there car to fit there driving style which cost $1500-$3000. A Dodge cost around $600-$1000.
3. Gas A gallon of gas in the 1930's cost around .15 cents per gallon. Gas was considered expensive that time because and average income was very low.
4. Housing An average price of a house in the 1930's was $7145. The cost of an acre was around $200 dollars.
5. Food Here are some average Food items they would eat: Bananas- 19 cents for 4 lbs Cereal box- 10 cents Loaf of bread- 5 cents Bacon- 37cents per pound Ketchup- 9 cents Potatoes- 18 cents for 10 lbs Hot Dog- 8 cents per pound Steak- 22 cents per pound Apple Sauce- 6 cents a Can Hot Cross Buns- 16 cents per dozen -But these all range depending on what state you buy them in-
6. Clothing - New materials that were cheap to process had been made during this decade to replace more expensive materials to spark the economy. -Shirt- $2.50 -Jeans- $20.00 dollars - Coats- $16.00 dollars - Socks- .10 cents - Underwear- .50 cents
7. Furniture Some Examples of Furniture: Mattress: $15.98 Desk: $9.95 Couch: $23.75 Floor Lamp: $12.95
8. Bibliography "The People History". April 26, 2009 <http://www.thepeoplehistory.com/30scars.html>. "Wiki Answers". Wikipedia. April 26, 2009 < http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_much_was_gas_in_the_1930%27s >. "Anytime Service Center". ASC. April 26, 2009 < http://www.anytimeservicecenter.com/images/Gas%20Can.jpg >. "/inlinethumb06.webshots". Web Shots. April 26, 2009 <http://inlinethumb06.webshots.com/12357/2948715640044785100S425x425Q85.jpg>. "The People History". Google. April 30, 2009 <http://www.thepeoplehistory.com/30sfood.html>.
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

Tommy
JoeJoe
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Looks like gutter science to me, and certainly nothing to boost an argument that quality of life has deteriorated - quite the opposite actually.

For example ... human salt consumption has gone down drastically since the invention of the refrigerator. Why would this book make me believe that we were better off 100 years ago?? Because we didn't eat as much sugar?? A hundred years ago we were lucky to get to eat meat once a week and had a life expectancy of only 50 years old.

Quit being ungrateful for the wonderful life you have. Tired of all these complainers, wake-up and realize how good you have it!

-JoeJoe
Amazing JoeJoe on YouTube[url=https://www.youtube.com/user/AmazingJoeJoe]
Bob1Dog
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Despite Al and me trying to poke some fun, this remains a thread of depression.
What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about? Smile

My neighbor rang my doorbell at 2:30 a.m. this morning, can you believe that, 2:30 a.m.!? Lucky for him I was still up playing my drums.
Woland
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Quote:
2. Cars An average car in the 1930's cost around $640. A Buick cost $825 dollars which had room for 2 to 4 passengers A Cadillac was a luxury car back then and the price ranged from $1500-$3000. A Chevrolet cost $500-$800 dollars for its safety and beauty. The Chrysler is also a luxury car for people who like there car to fit there driving style which cost $1500-$3000. A Dodge cost around $600-$1000.


That was before the wholesale depreciation of the dollar, tommy. The fact that a "silver dollar" costs 30 paper dollars today says more about the debasement of currency than any rise is the price of silver.

If you multiply the prices you cite by 25 to 30, you'll see that the actual price of an automobile in constant dollars hasn't changed much.

But more important is the fact that almost everyone in America can afford to buy an automobile today. During the 1920s and 1930s, with the possible partial exception of the Model T, automobiles were not in the picture for most Americans. And neither was electricity at home, indoor plumbing, home refrigeration, and much else that we can take for granted today.
landmark
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Agreed that measuring relative costs from one era to another is very tricky. I think the best way--though not perfect, and also fraught with pitfalls--is to measure cost in terms of how many working hours does it take to buy something.
tommy
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Deco Restaurants were small diners that offered mainly counter service. Most importantly, each location offered excellent food at very low prices. A hot-dog was a dime, a hamburger was a dime and a cup of coffee was a nickel. The menu offered specialties such as the "Hamburg Deluxe" which was a hamburger served on bread, covered with gravy and a side order of french fries for fifteen cents. Add a cup of coffee and you could do lunch for twenty cents.

When the Great Depression hit in 1929, Buffalo didn't suffer from the severe economic ruin that plagued other parts of the country. "Deco made more money during the Depression than at any time in the country's history," according to Stanley F. Phillips, the comptroller of Deco in the late '50s and early '60s. In the 1930s, most people were out of work so a Deco Restaurant was a natural hang-out. Open 24 hours, a Deco was always crowded with all types of people. Politicians, cops and street urchins all went into a Deco for a 5 cent cup of coffee. People at this time - working at Deco - were still earning 12 to 15 bucks a week as a result of the Depression, but when the war broke out and all these people went to work in the war plants, they were earning over 100 bucks a week.

http://www.buffalohistoryworks.com/deco/history/history.htm
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

Tommy
Al Angello
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Bob1Dog
I'm so glad that my bragging didn't make you angry. We need more humor here.
Al Angello The Comic Juggler/Magician
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Woland
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I agree that's a reasonable way to compare costs, landmark.
JoeJoe
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Quote:
On 2013-05-20 06:42, Woland wrote:
That was before the wholesale depreciation of the dollar, tommy. The fact that a "silver dollar" costs 30 paper dollars today says more about the debasement of currency than any rise is the price of silver.

If you multiply the prices you cite by 25 to 30, you'll see that the actual price of an automobile in constant dollars hasn't changed much.

But more important is the fact that almost everyone in America can afford to buy an automobile today. During the 1920s and 1930s, with the possible partial exception of the Model T, automobiles were not in the picture for most Americans. And neither was electricity at home, indoor plumbing, home refrigeration, and much else that we can take for granted today.


This is exactly right - nor did they have cable TV or internet access. The notion that we should be depressed because we are so much worse off today than we were in 1930 is laughable, get help Tommy.

-JoeJoe
Amazing JoeJoe on YouTube[url=https://www.youtube.com/user/AmazingJoeJoe]
tommy
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Since the notion that we should be depressed because we are so much worse off today than we were in 1930 is not what I have asserted, I don't think your gutter sniping personal remarks matter a jot.
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

Tommy
JoeJoe
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No - that is what you asserted ....

Quote:
On 2013-05-18 19:22, tommy wrote:
Have more people committed suicide this time than last time?


-JoeJoe
Amazing JoeJoe on YouTube[url=https://www.youtube.com/user/AmazingJoeJoe]
tommy
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That is a question. It is not an assertion.

Get it?

Quote:
On 2013-05-19 23:32, tommy wrote:
By the way. I provided facts for the purpose of comparing the old Great Depression
with this new Great Depression which we are in. I have not said this is a worse Depression or not. I merely asked the question whether it is or not.
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

Tommy
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