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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » Turning Raw Footage into Promo (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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bishthemagish
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If your going to do it yourself I suggest is getting good editing software. And edit the live footage yourself. If you decide check out the people at the local cable axis station in your town. They may be able to help take footage that is better than a guy with a camera at a party - taking footage.

If you are really serious about video and doing your own. I would suggest taking a class at the local axis cable station in town. When I wanted to do DVDs and edit my own video. That is what I did. These local axis statins produce local TV for the local station. When I took my class it was free.

I learned how to storyboard the project and how to frame shots and a lot of TV know how.

You should also learn how to edit for show business. The problem I have had with people that edit that are not magicians is - many people in TV have no idea just how to video tape magic and edit. You knowing how to edit is an advantage even if you are not doing the work.

Also taking a class in axis cable TV might also give you some contacts that you can use for a promo video.

Here is my old video promo from my web site. I use this to sell my hypnosis show.

http://www.glennbishopproductions.com/video/hyp.wmv

Here is my magic video promo

http://www.glennbishopproductions.com/vi......stle.wmv

I hope this helps
Glenn Bishop Cardician

Producer of the DVD Punch Deal Pro

Publisher of Glenn Bishop's Ace Cutting And Block Transfer Triumphs
Mindpro
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Quote:
On 2013-08-15 12:36, bishthemagish wrote:

If you are really serious about video and doing your own. I would suggest taking a class at the local axis cable station in town. When I wanted to do DVDs and edit my own video. That is what I did. These local axis statins produce local TV for the local station. When I took my class it was free.

I learned how to storyboard the project and how to frame shots and a lot of TV know how.

You should also learn how to edit for show business. The problem I have had with people that edit that are not magicians is - many people in TV have no idea just how to video tape magic and edit. You knowing how to edit is an advantage even if you are not doing the work


This was the kind of advice gurus gave in the 80's. It was poor advice then and still is nor. Local Cable Access is run by amateurs, interns and beginners. They are the last people I'd go to for advice or a professional job. Today's do-it-yourself software is much better than their level of work. Even their classes teach only the basics.

I do agree the video should be created for the intended viewer not the performer. That's why you must start backwards with the markets you are specifically targeting, what they need, want or expect and tailor your project to them the recipient, buyer.

In this youtube generation the old "MTV-style" format of quick cuts and editing is a thing of the past (so are testimonials in my opinion). Even if I received a well-produced demo from someone I was interested in I'd still want to see a complete performance in many situations. It's quite common knowledge anyone can make anything look good, appealing and exciting in 3-4 minutes, but there's so much that this type of demo doesn't show.
bishthemagish
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Quote:
On 2013-08-15 12:47, Mindpro wrote:
This was the kind of advice gurus gave in the 80's. It was poor advice then and still is nor. Local Cable Access is run by amateurs, interns and beginners. They are the last people I'd go to for advice or a professional job. Today's do-it-yourself software is much better than their level of work. Even their classes teach only the basics.

I am laughing out loud at this post.

Television axis does teach the basics - a foundation. If one wants to learn video it is still in my opinion a great way to start. And through TV axis I did meet different people from local TV and went on from there. That were not television axis people.

Quote:
On 2013-08-15 12:47, Mindpro wrote:
I do agree the video should be created for the intended viewer not the performer. That's why you must start backwards with the markets you are specifically targeting, what they need, want or expect and tailor your project to them the recipient, buyer.

Basic advertising - and I also think that magicians should study and get at least a basic level of advertising. And I do think that basic cable axis falls into this - if one wants to start and get a basic idea of television and video.
Quote:
On 2013-08-15 12:47, Mindpro wrote:
In this youtube generation the old "MTV-style" format of quick cuts and editing is a thing of the past (so are testimonials in my opinion). Even if I received a well-produced demo from someone I was interested in I'd still want to see a complete performance in many situations. It's quite common knowledge anyone can make anything look good, appealing and exciting in 3-4 minutes, but there's so much that this type of demo doesn't show.

So what you are saying is that you book acts, shows?

A video is nothing more than a teaser - a taste of the show. It should make the client (in my opinion) want to see more. I don't book acts - and I do not work for agents because I have yet to meet an agent that meets with my old school high standards of the way I do business.

A video is in my opinion and always should be a short segment to show talent of the artist.

Not to make a client that is looking for reason's not to book someone find fault with an artist.

I hope this helps.

Cheers!
Glenn Bishop Cardician

Producer of the DVD Punch Deal Pro

Publisher of Glenn Bishop's Ace Cutting And Block Transfer Triumphs
Dannydoyle
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I am confused. Is it cable axis or "access"?
Danny Doyle
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<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
bishthemagish
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Quote:
On 2013-08-15 16:17, Dannydoyle wrote:
I am confused. Is it cable axis or "access"?

You and everyone else it is most likely access.

To me and my dyslexic mind it can be axis or many other ways depending on how my brain intakes data that day.

However I am not one that regards people that make correction of spelling and grammar on internet forums in high regard (unless it is the monitors). Especially when in my opinion some often do it to insult.

Nice try - yet again. Still did not work.

My opinion!
Glenn Bishop Cardician

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Publisher of Glenn Bishop's Ace Cutting And Block Transfer Triumphs
Dannydoyle
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Hey dude I was ASKING BECAUSE I DIDN'T KNOW.

Can't you answer a simple question without taking offense? It was a simple question. I have never seen it spelled before so I asked which it was as I thought it was another.

Get over yourself.

I have never ONCE made a spelling post of another. NOT ONCE. Now you accuse me of it? Lame, very lame. It shows YOUR agenda and paranoia and self centered attitude toward everything.

See Glenn the only way I learn is when I don't know something I ASK QUESTIONS and LISTEN TO THE ANSWER. Not high on your priority list I know as you are the worlds foremost authority on EVERYTHING. But we mere mortals are forced to do this.
Danny Doyle
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<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
bishthemagish
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On 2013-08-15 17:18, Dannydoyle wrote:
Hey dude I was ASKING BECAUSE I DIDN'T KNOW.

Can't you answer a simple question without taking offense? It was a simple question. I have never seen it spelled before so I asked which it was as I thought it was another.

Get over yourself.

I have never ONCE made a spelling post of another. NOT ONCE. Now you accuse me of it? Lame, very lame. It shows YOUR agenda and paranoia and self centered attitude toward everything.

See Glenn the only way I learn is when I don't know something I ASK QUESTIONS and LISTEN TO THE ANSWER. Not high on your priority list I know as you are the worlds foremost authority on EVERYTHING. But we mere mortals are forced to do this.


Nice try - again.

I thought you would know by now at this late date that nothing winds me up. And this above is nothing more than your opinion of me. However as you said in another thread about facebook. When you called a person oh wizard of wise - you don't know me - and know nothing about me.

Cheers!
Glenn Bishop Cardician

Producer of the DVD Punch Deal Pro

Publisher of Glenn Bishop's Ace Cutting And Block Transfer Triumphs
Dannydoyle
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Don't derail yet another thread because you imagine people are saying things they are not please.

Nobody is trying to wind you up. I asked a question. You took offense because you made an incorrect assumption about my question. That is all on you buddy. Nobody is trying to wind you up. I don't care enough about you to even try. I thought that should be clear.

Just stop assuming things. It makes life easier. (Incidentally it was "wizard of smart".

And Glenn I know nothing about you and it makes me smile. So please stop.

Though I know you are a last word sort of guy so go ahead. I know you can't resist. (Another thing nobody knows about you LOL.)
Danny Doyle
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<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
Dannydoyle
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Now that the paranoia is out of the way lets talk about video editing and why it is or is not useful.
Danny Doyle
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<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
bishthemagish
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Quote:
On 2013-08-15 18:55, Dannydoyle wrote:
Now that the paranoia is out of the way

Nice try again - why don't you go back to name calling?

This reminds me of buskers all over again. Please remember I can't be wound up so you can insult me all you want to. Any insults directed toward me has no effect on me - and in my opinion it makes me look good.
Quote:
On 2013-08-15 18:55, Dannydoyle wrote:
lets talk about video editing and why it is or is not useful.

Again I take the high road.
Glenn Bishop Cardician

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Publisher of Glenn Bishop's Ace Cutting And Block Transfer Triumphs
Dannydoyle
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Yes you look great. Lets talk video.
Danny Doyle
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<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
bishthemagish
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I always look great because I can't be insulted because the insult has no effect on me. Being called paranoid or to GET OVER MYSELF and this kind of posting (See Glenn the only way I learn is when I don't know something I ASK QUESTIONS and LISTEN TO THE ANSWER. Not high on your priority list I know as you are the worlds foremost authority on EVERYTHING. But we mere mortals are forced to do this) is a worthless waste of time because it has no effect on me.

People seem to want to do this in my opinion because they have some sort of agenda. Or they want to get back at me. Or they just want to put me down because they want to act like they are right - or cooler - or have more knowledge about magic etc. (my opinion).

However I have found over the years that people that do this are usually the one’s with the problem. The advantage I have is that I book and do show under my own business plan. Just as I post my opinion coming from my own point of view. Even when others seem to want to wind me up.

Do you have a video?

The only reason I have a video is because I have a web site. Those large packs of promo I used to send out with a video tape. Was replaced by a web site.

Granted my video is about 10 years old and needs to be up-dated. However when I did edit my video I sent it on DVD to Bev Bergeron who played Rebo the clown on the Magical Land of Alakazam for a thumbs up on if it would sell me.

My way of doing video is based on show them several shows in a montage. Then slow down and show segments with "laughter" and situation comedy (more laughter). And end with laughter and hopefully after the edit the client wants to see more - so I give contact info. My web site.

I hope this helps.
Glenn Bishop Cardician

Producer of the DVD Punch Deal Pro

Publisher of Glenn Bishop's Ace Cutting And Block Transfer Triumphs
Benji Bruce
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Rule number one of making a good demo video is....don't make it yourself. Just because you can edit video doesn't mean you can make a demo video.

Here is my demo: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yqhszLsnIs

And here is where I go into a lot of detail about creating a demo video: http://www.paidtoperform.com/demo-video-structure/

My demo was made from footage that was recorded with several cameras (the guy editing the demo didn't film anything except the b-roll footage of me on the white background). Some were professional (like the Remax & Fox News clips) and others were just done with a phone or normal camera. The footage was sent to a pro and he edited it perfectly to fit my style.

If you follow the demo structure I listed on the Paid To Perform site then it's much easier to get a good demo.

From the very start, you must have social proof. When the demo starts, the viewer should immediately know it was done by a pro (on my demo, you see the quick cuts on a white background with voice overs so you can tell it was professionally made). But if your demo starts with a logo of you, your name, etc, then the viewer isn't invested in you yet to even care. Top event planners can tell a professional demo from the first 10 seconds.

As the demo continues, you need to include pattern interrupts (every 90 seconds or so) because that is the time our attention spans wane. The pattern interrupts bring it back.

The testimonials in your demo must borrow from the social proof of the person giving the testimonial. It's much better to have a testimonial from a CEO than from a random person. And the footage itself should show more of the response you get rather than the routine itself. It should also show the crowd, not a close up of you (When you're in front of a crowd of 500, it makes you look better).

There's a lot more info about demo's but you should always find someone to edit your demo for you. Not only does it free up your time to do other stuff for your business but you get a better demo in the long run.

With that in mind, if you can't afford to hire a pro, don't try to make a demo...just make a video with quick cuts like this... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LmqUO2HLc0w

You'll notice that video wasn't meant to be a "demo video." It was just meant to be a collection of reactions.

In short, hire a pro.
jugglery
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One thing to keep in mind is that most viewers don't use their imaginations when watching the video. So, a video of you doing exclusively grandstand entertainment will be great for booking more grandstand entertainment.

It probably won't be good for booking corporate events or schools, or what have you. What people see on the video is what they will expect from you in real life.

So, great for grandstands. If you want to promote to other venues, it would be best to use footage that matches the venue that you wish to market to.

Seems like obvious advice, but many performers overlook the obvious.

Make your marketing fit the market.

Best of luck with your video project.
Steve Russell

www.steverusselljuggles.com

Video Editing - www.GigReels.com
Dannydoyle
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Benji offers some great advice on video.
Danny Doyle
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<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
MagicJim
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I was always struggling to get good quality raw footage. Promo videos are important. There are a lot of things to think about... angle of effect, angle towards audience to gather their reactions, scheduling of a professional videographer, and the scheduling of a videographer with the ability to be energetic to gather video testimonials after the show.

Here is my latest promo video. I did hire a professional videographer at one of the two locations. I gave my best effort at editing it. Not sure if I should gather more footage and/or hire professional video editors...
Jim
Here is the link http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMcB3gQ9CyA&feature=youtu.be
David Thiel
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I enjoyed your demo very much, Jim. Cleanly photographed and very precise in its message. Thank you for sharing it here.

David
Whatever doesn't kill you makes you stronger. Except bears. Bears will kill you.


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bishthemagish
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Good points jugglery.

I am not a fan of doing testimonials in a video. To me a video is nothing more than selling like a movie trailer would sell a movie. Why send anyone the whole show? Unless it is for a special client or a special show date. Which would be only once or twice.

Testimonials slow the video down in my opinion and if the magician shows the same people saying different things over and over again. I think that it is like showing segments of the same show over and over again. Like the person did just one show and got that one show on video.

To me having a montage of several shows and different audiences - shows the that the performer has been performing for a while. Doing shows in different venues helps - then show some entertainment - and as I like to - let them listen to the laughter.

In my opinion - audience laughter sells.

Again - one size does not fit all - I a just saying what has worked for me.

Cheers!
Glenn Bishop Cardician

Producer of the DVD Punch Deal Pro

Publisher of Glenn Bishop's Ace Cutting And Block Transfer Triumphs
Jon Mac
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I'm a novice magician, but I've been involved in video production for a long time. I'll leave the content issues to others, but I might (hopefully) have some helpful input regarding the technical side of things. I've worked in video production for many years and my current day job is encoding Blu-ray video for Hollywood studios.

The big question is how much you are willing to spend. You need to decide the worth of the video to YOU. It's like any other business expense. Obviously you want the most bang for the buck.

If you want to DIY, then you'll need to learn some skills that I'll go into later, but if you don't have the time or inclination, then you'll need to hire a pro (or make friends with somebody who has skills and access to equipment.) Freelance videographers (or talented film students) are often willing to barter. Maybe you can work out a trade.

Think backwards, i.e. want do you want as your end result? Even though you might just want a video for web use, the higher quality you start out with with mean a better end result. If your goal is a YouTube video, it is still best if you shoot in HD. The reason for this is that the video will be compressed once it goes online. Watch a compressed movie trailer, then watch the average YouTube video. Even though both are compressed, the movie trailer obviously looks much better because it started out at much higher quality. Plus, if you have a high quality HD master, then you can also use that as a source for making a DVD or any other needs you might have down the road. Everything is HD these days. DVDs are still around and are, of course, SD, but they are created from HD masters. You won't save any money by shooting SD using outdated technology.

If you decide the technical quality is important, then make a budget. It doesn't have to be a huge budget, since the cost of gear has gone down and competition has increased. But, you need to put in some work researching your area to find the rates of professional videographers. There are two things you are paying for: equipment and skill. You want a decent camera/lighting/audio package AND an operator who knows how to put that gear to best use.

These days, it's relatively inexpensive to get a pro who comes with a decent camera package, including lighting and audio. As mentioned above somewhere, good audio is crucial. The kind of gear a good video freelancer has is often the same kind of equipment used to make independent feature films.

Pay attention to the videographer's own demo reel. If he or she doesn't impress you with their demo, then they probably won't shoot a good one for you. It's good if they have experience shooting cinematically. Some videographers specialize in corporate events, weddings, or documentary style shooting, but I would think you'd want one that has done short films. Think of your demo as a little movie starring you and your audience. It should be theatrical, right? So you need to hire someone that you can work with and that will understand your special needs as a magician.

But that's only the first step. Once you have your footage, you then need somebody to edit it. The editor will also need to be somebody you are comfortable with and is capable of working with you to bring your vision to life. Here's an important tip: have the editor and the videographer communicate before you start the project. There are lots of different cameras and lots of different video formats, so you want to make sure the editor's system can handle the files that will be provided by the videographer.

Ideally, you want the editor to provide you with the highest quality master file of your final cut. This will be an HD master file. You'll keep this file and back it up (multiple backups are best) and put it in a safe place. You then have a pristine final master cut of your demo, which you can then use if you want to make a DVD or Blu-ray disc, or provide to media outlets, etc. It's best if the editor can ALSO provide you with a web version of the file. If they are familiar with making high quality YouTube or Vimeo encodes, then that is very important. Optimizing the specs for online video sites can be tricky, so rather than struggling through it yourself, it's great if they can do it for you. Make that part of the deal, if possible. If not, then you at least have your highest quality master file that you can compress for online use.

If you've read this far, you are probably wondering how big of a budget you need. I don't know. That depends on where you live. I live in LA and just did a google search of "Los Angeles Actor Demo Reels." I found a place that does three 60 second scenes for $1190. That includes audio, lighting, and editing. Obviously an actor demo reel is not quite the same as a magician's performance, but I bet they would be willing to work with a magician, and it gives you a ballpark figure. I'm thinking (I don't know for sure) that a company that specializes in shooting cinematic scenes would be a good fit for a magician demo. Hollywood has outsourced so much these days, that you can probably find this kind of service in most states (although still probably easier in LA, New York, etc.)

Depending on how techie you are, you might want to educate yourself on the different cameras available and learn about HD formats, etc. Try googling "Red Camera", "Canon EOS 5D Mark III", "DSLR Filmmaking."

Finally, if you decide to go the DIY route, you should take a class, or at least google up some tutorials. A low budget solutions is to have your cousin shoot with whatever camcorder they have and editing in free software such as iMovie or Windows Movie Maker etc. Don't use the camera microphone if you can avoid it. Hopefully the camera will have an external mic input and you should at least rent or buy a lavaliere mic that you wear that is connected to the camera. You can get lights from home depot or shoot outside. When you edit, keep it simple. Avoid cheesy transitions and effects and graphics.

There are definitely ways of working on a shoe string and making it look good, but it takes time and knowledge. As the old saying goes, you can have "fast, cheap, or high quality, pick any two." But, again, you need to decide the worth of the demo to your business, and budget accordingly.

Hope this helps Smile
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