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cricketer15
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Sydney, Australia
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Hi, not completely new to magic, can do sleights and false cuts with cards and know a bunch of card tricks, have like over 20 decks sitting at home doing nothing ,rubber bands tricks and coin tricks etc and have perform to family and friends. this was a while back, decided to get back into magic.

But how do I get the confidence to perform to random strangers on the streets? Have you ever screwed up a trick infront of a large group, and if so what did you guys do to overcome this as this is my biggest fear.
Looking to perform magic at my university and around Sydney just to random students/people.
I have recently bought a whole bunch of stuff from penguin magic.
dresscode
Sharpie through card
unleased
permanent prediction
Toosh
the stealth pen
loops (use to do the haunted deck alot)

appstore
iforce and telephoto

looking to add more stuff from penguin this week when I get my paycheck- ACE, Money shot.
but are there any Bill changing trick that works with Australian currency atm, as I heard our polymer note isn't eeffective with all of the bill change trick like greed, cinch, bill breaker etc.
also which is the best bending trick out there atm?
Anything is Possible
Dallas Robbins
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I think one way to build confidence is to master the effect you want to present - not just the mechanics of the method, but also the presentation/patter that you bring to the effect. Become so good at it, that it becomes second nature. Then perform for friends or family. Focus on a handful of effect you want to master. Then before you know it, you're confidence will grow. There is always a chance one might mess up, but the more practice you put into, the better off you will be. And don't worry about being nervous, that's normal, and one can't cure normal.
davidpaul$
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Dallas has some great advice.... Just to add my 2 cents... after the advice given...Just go out and do it.
You are going to mess up, we all did and do from time to time. The only way to become a great swimmer is to get into the water and swim.
Learn from your mistakes, learn from your spectators too. It's ok if they say "I saw that in your other hand" Then you know you have to work on that aspect of your routine.

I've learned so much from performing in front of so many different personality types from the know-it-all, to the rude, to the person who will stare at your hands no matter what you do, to the person who loves everything you do and think you are the greatest magician they have ever seen. Experience-Experience-Experience.. perform whenever and wherever you can. There are always fundraisers going on so go volunteer you time for a worthy cause...Experience... The more you perform the more you will learn and the more comfortable you will become.

There is no other route or other way around it. The spectator makes the judgment whether you are good or not, whether you are a confident performer or not. The ONLY way to get good and gain confidence is to get in front of people. It's the ONLY way..
Enjoy yourself though...That's a Biggy!!!!
If you can't help worrying, remember worrying can't help you!
Yellowcustard
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New Zealand
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cricketer15 relax and breath. You seem to have a pile of new stuff ranging from stuff you have, stuff in the post and stuff you want but have not got the money for. Your probable looking in books and catolges and seeing loads of stuff you like. Seeing stuff on You Tube and thinking and can do that or be like that. This is good enjoy it we all have our moments. 5 years ago I got rid of a lot of my stuff just kept the old faithful. Last year at my first convention for a while I brought a pile of stuff. Now I am culling that down.

Any way to answer you question I would suggest this approach.

Step 1) find 3 effects you do well. The first one quick and visual. 2nd something involving a spectator, 3rd something strong and stand alone. (Crazy man hand cuffs/ Ambitious card/ Rope effect)

Get the 3 effect together in a small box and work on them and patter. Then go out some were were people are hanging out a and put up a sign say Magic. someone will come up and ask what your doing and go for it. Use friends as a fake crowd to attract more. Yes you will stuff up but that's OK keep going.

Once these 3 tricks come your old faithfuls you can use two of them to sandwich in a new effect.

You can adapt this aprrouch and change the effect to suite your need. but the skelton is,
1) Know 3 effects so well your not worrying about any thing like were the sharpie or did I set that deck up rigth. the less you have the less can go wrong.
2) Practice and only do what your compleatly comfortable in. This include venue, patter and audience.
3) Write out something you want to achieve before you go out to perform. At the end of the day write down your experiance.
4) Get out a do it-A LOT

The more you can plan and control what you have control of means that you can cope with the thing you don't have control of

Also see you order a lot of stuff are you aware of Heypresto magic shop in Pitt Street. Next time I am in Sydeny lets meet up. If your ever in Auckland I am 10min from the Airport we have coffee. Also Troppo Bob is a Café member and if he live a few hour out of sydeny but in a place like OZ that's close.

Keep in touch feel free to ask any thing at any time.
Enjoy your magic,

and let others enjoy it as well!
plink
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Go to a nursing home. The people usually appreciate any kind of attention, you get to hone magic and people skills.
Eric Caldwell
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Kentucky
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Messing up is hardly as bad as your mind would have you believe. I am one of the most anxious people you will ever meet. I perform magic for at least one stranger a day. Rejection and failure aren't nearly as bad as you may believe before they happen.
DWRackley
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Chattanooga, TN
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"How to gain confidence to approach people"? Repetition.

The phrase "just do it" is your friend! Smile

Often we over-think things and can literally scare ourselves out of something fun. As long as you've put in the practice and have the ability, follow your gut. If someone looks friendly and approachable, they usually are. If you see quiet, focused, or intense conversation, they probably will not welcome an intrusion.

We sometimes fall into a mental trap, that somehow we're asking them for a favor by drawing their attention. In one way, that's true, but in reality, we're offering them something very special, something they'll probably like, and usually remember and talk about sometime later.

Do be sensitive. Don't "ambush" them. Use your common sense. If you pay attention, you know when (and when not) to move.
...what if I could read your mind?

Chattanooga's Premier Mentalist

Donatelli and Company at ChattanoogaPerformers.com

also on FaceBook
cricketer15
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Sydney, Australia
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Thanks for the advice guys, just gonna hit the streets/university and bars and just do it. (got to master the effects first)

also yeah @Yellowcustard I've shopped at hey presto magic studio in sydney before, bought one of my first few tricks there.
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mrsmiles
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Hi Cricketer15,
Good luck! One additional thought... instead of 'street magic' and approaching strangers on the street and in bars, have you thought about approaching charity events and asking if you can do some magic free of charge - it's great experience. I think performing to people here would relieve some anxiety out of approaching strangers as you can say to the public you approach that the organisers have booked you to go round offering entertainment. Thus this doesn't feel so intrusive or weird or awkward etc

As to the fear of messing up, I can only reiterate what others have said. Only perform tricks that you have learnt inside out, do not perform anything where you might hesitate or have to think about what you have to do next. This will help you to perform with greater confidence and of course you are much less likely to mess up because you know the tricks so well. In addition I would advise approaching the first couple of people not necessarily with your best 'opener' but simply the trick that you perform with the greatest ease and confidence (as long as it is not a long, slow routine). This is simply so that you get off to a good start. The 'high' that this will give you will be a great boost. You can then later on put your best 'opener' on first with the benefit of the confidence that a great start has given you.
Good luck!
mrsmiles
(UK)
cricketer15
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Quote:
On 2013-11-12 06:57, mrsmiles wrote:
Hi Cricketer15,
Good luck! One additional thought... instead of 'street magic' and approaching strangers on the street and in bars, have you thought about approaching charity events and asking if you can do some magic free of charge - it's great experience. I think performing to people here would relieve some anxiety out of approaching strangers as you can say to the public you approach that the organisers have booked you to go round offering entertainment. Thus this doesn't feel so intrusive or weird or awkward etc

As to the fear of messing up, I can only reiterate what others have said. Only perform tricks that you have learnt inside out, do not perform anything where you might hesitate or have to think about what you have to do next. This will help you to perform with greater confidence and of course you are much less likely to mess up because you know the tricks so well. In addition I would advise approaching the first couple of people not necessarily with your best 'opener' but simply the trick that you perform with the greatest ease and confidence (as long as it is not a long, slow routine). This is simply so that you get off to a good start. The 'high' that this will give you will be a great boost. You can then later on put your best 'opener' on first with the benefit of the confidence that a great start has given you.
Good luck!


thanks! I tend to get excited when I received a new product and want to perform and use it ASAP haha, I guess I should try and master it first to avoid screwing up Smile
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Jinx18
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There is no secret. Walk up and say hey can I show you a magic trick? Even the best get turned down. Have you seen David Blaine's specials? People literally run away from him and he just laughs and continues his day with other people. You. Can tell if someone is interested in magic or someone who hates it.
Theodore Lawton
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Great advice on this thread. I would just like to add that 'messing up' can be a really good thing. It shows you where you're weak. It can also teach you the art of recovery and improvisation. There are times you may 'mess up' a trick that will completely fly right by a spectator and there will be times that you will immediately get an idea of how to save a trick that hasn't been completely ruined. These are good things to know and have in your arsenal. You will be amazed at the stuff you can get away with right in front of people through calm demeanor, chatting, eye contact, etc. And regarding completely blowing it; remember, you're there to entertain, so if you've already made a connection with the people blowing it won't be as bad as you see it in your mind before it happens. Sure, it sucks, but it teaches you the other art of humility. Being able to laugh and say a funny one liner to show you don't take yourself too seriously. Just use studied, analytical practice and verbal rehearsal til you're blue in the face and follow the above advice by doing your best stuff until you're ready to add more. As said: use family and friends to try out new stuff. I work at a front desk in a health club and get to tell my regulars, "Here's something new I want to try with you, so if I screw it up it's okay because we're all friends here." They get a laugh, I'm able to try out new material and just saying those words helps to put myself at ease if I'm nervous. It's like, hey, we're friends and this is just a trick, we won't be solving all the world's problems today. Let's have some fun.

And- to repeat what others have said: just do it. The more you do it the less nervous you will be.
cricketer15
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Sydney, Australia
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Quote:
On 2013-11-15 21:28, Theodore Lawton wrote:
Great advice on this thread. I would just like to add that 'messing up' can be a really good thing. It shows you where you're weak. It can also teach you the art of recovery and improvisation. There are times you may 'mess up' a trick that will completely fly right by a spectator and there will be times that you will immediately get an idea of how to save a trick that hasn't been completely ruined. These are good things to know and have in your arsenal. You will be amazed at the stuff you can get away with right in front of people through calm demeanor, chatting, eye contact, etc. And regarding completely blowing it; remember, you're there to entertain, so if you've already made a connection with the people blowing it won't be as bad as you see it in your mind before it happens. Sure, it sucks, but it teaches you the other art of humility. Being able to laugh and say a funny one liner to show you don't take yourself too seriously. Just use studied, analytical practice and verbal rehearsal til you're blue in the face and follow the above advice by doing your best stuff until you're ready to add more. As said: use family and friends to try out new stuff. I work at a front desk in a health club and get to tell my regulars, "Here's something new I want to try with you, so if I screw it up it's okay because we're all friends here." They get a laugh, I'm able to try out new material and just saying those words helps to put myself at ease if I'm nervous. It's like, hey, we're friends and this is just a trick, we won't be solving all the world's problems today. Let's have some fun.

And- to repeat what others have said: just do it. The more you do it the less nervous you will be.


thanks! magic has boosted my confidence a lot and will hopefully help me get rid of approach anxiety.
Anything is Possible
mrsmiles
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Quote:
thanks! I tend to get excited when I received a new product and want to perform and use it ASAP haha, I guess I should try and master it first to avoid screwing up Smile


You're welcome!
As for buying stuff, getting excited and wanting to perform it asap - that's natural. We've all been there. Try and dicipline yourself to 'play' with these on your own (they are like great, fun toys!), or perform them just to a close friend or a fellow newish magician, and for strangers/the public stick to the stuff you have learnt inside out.
Good luck!
mrsmiles
(UK)
Theodore Lawton
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You're welcome! Smile
Zack_Johnston
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California
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You might want to try The Approach by Jamie D. Grant. There are rave reviews about it….Not one review on Penguin Magic under five stars!

Not only does it have advice on common situations while performing and how to approach people, it includes articles, studies, lessons, essays, anecdotes, advice, tips, tricks. I personally don't have it, but it seems to be a worthy investment. Smile

Zack Johnston

:bluebikes:
nytaylor21
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Utah
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Great advice! It's great to see so many different points of view! Approaching strangers is difficult for me as well. Although I've found that it does get easier (like magic) with practice.
cricketer15
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Quote:
On 2013-11-16 18:44, Zack_Johnston wrote:
You might want to try The Approach by Jamie D. Grant. There are rave reviews about it….Not one review on Penguin Magic under five stars!

Not only does it have advice on common situations while performing and how to approach people, it includes articles, studies, lessons, essays, anecdotes, advice, tips, tricks. I personally don't have it, but it seems to be a worthy investment. Smile

Zack Johnston

:bluebikes:




cheers, I bought like way extra stuff to the original list now.
Anything is Possible
cricketer15
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Sydney, Australia
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Quote:
On 2013-11-18 10:49, nytaylor21 wrote:
Great advice! It's great to see so many different points of view! Approaching strangers is difficult for me as well. Although I've found that it does get easier (like magic) with practice.


yeah! but the reactions is worth it!
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nytaylor21
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Agreed, the reactions are well worth it. I think the overall experience is worth it, but that doesn't make it any easier initially.
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