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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Latest and Greatest? » » SOLO: The Bachelor Coin Routine by Kainoa Harbottle (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Zombie Magic
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I went out for a beer and now have
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It's the Cool Box deal:

http://www.penguinmagic.com/p/3721

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SociallyAwkwardPenguin
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I love Kainoa, his is charming, funny and happy to share. He helped me no end with a routine at The Session 2 years ago. That being said, I have an issue with ANY one coin thing like this (aside from the Slydini one coin trick) which is this: If you have a coin, and put it in your other hand, and it vanishes, the audience think, rightly, it is in your other hand. So all you are doing, essentially, is cleverly hiding a coin.

I just showed my wife the vid, and she said "yes, it was nice enough, but I knew all the time the coin was just in his other hand". Which is why the Slydini routine is different, because you have many moments of showing both hands empty.

But generally, Harbottle FTW. Just not this, or any, one coin non seated routine.
Swann101
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Ya agree, these routines look like a lot of slieghts and not "magic"
Acar
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This routine is great because it teaches an entire crash course in coin magic in one instructional video. I think of this routine as more of a training routine. Like P90X for coin magicians or something Smile
Quentin
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Over thirty years ago I developed a one coin routine. Turning up at children's parties, there would often be other children playing in the street who were not invited to the party - wrong age group etc. Seeing me unload form the car many would come over and ask if I were a magician and would I show them a trick. I did my one coin routine. It is very interactive.

Watching the video clip, I think Kainoa has a terrific routine. What is missing from the video is the interaction with an audience. That is what makes it strong. Handing them a coin that disappears and then it is found elsewhere. His technique is very good and there are a couple of moves I could add to my routine.

I like this a lot. Putting a series of moves and blending them into a solid routine creates an experience for your audience that is far greater than the sum of the parts.
S-Branham
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It is always a great idea to learn a one coin routine. If you don't have a coin, you can always borrow a coin and You will be ready to roll!

http://www.penguinmagic.com/p/3721
Stellan
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If you think you always can borrow a coin and do this or any other good one coin routine I think you will become disappointed. There are very few, if any, places in the world where you can borrow a suitable coin with the right size and weight.
Every magician that does a one coin routine on a regular basis has his own coin in his pocket.
"There is no reality, only perception."
SociallyAwkwardPenguin
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Quote:
On 2013-11-14 09:41, Quentin wrote:
Over thirty years ago I developed a one coin routine. Turning up at children's parties, there would often be other children playing in the street who were not invited to the party - wrong age group etc. Seeing me unload form the car many would come over and ask if I were a magician and would I show them a trick. I did my one coin routine. It is very interactive.

Watching the video clip, I think Kainoa has a terrific routine. What is missing from the video is the interaction with an audience. That is what makes it strong. Handing them a coin that disappears and then it is found elsewhere. His technique is very good and there are a couple of moves I could add to my routine.

I like this a lot. Putting a series of moves and blending them into a solid routine creates an experience for your audience that is far greater than the sum of the parts.


Q, you're a charmer and a talented performer. I have nothing but respect for you. I can imagine children are hugely fooled by your routine. Adults? I imagine they think you are cleverly hiding the coin in your other hand.
Quentin
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Quote:
On 2013-11-14 17:19, SociallyAwkwardPenguin wrote:
Quote:
On 2013-11-14 09:41, Quentin wrote:
Over thirty years ago I developed a one coin routine. Turning up at children's parties, there would often be other children playing in the street who were not invited to the party - wrong age group etc. Seeing me unload form the car many would come over and ask if I were a magician and would I show them a trick. I did my one coin routine. It is very interactive.

Watching the video clip, I think Kainoa has a terrific routine. What is missing from the video is the interaction with an audience. That is what makes it strong. Handing them a coin that disappears and then it is found elsewhere. His technique is very good and there are a couple of moves I could add to my routine.

I like this a lot. Putting a series of moves and blending them into a solid routine creates an experience for your audience that is far greater than the sum of the parts.


Q, you're a charmer and a talented performer. I have nothing but respect for you. I can imagine children are hugely fooled by your routine. Adults? I imagine they think you are cleverly hiding the coin in your other hand.


You are correct and the point you make is valid regardless of whether you are performing for children or adults.

If you simply place a coin in one hand and it vanishes, the obvious place to look is the other hand. In fact, a child is very likely to voice such an opinion while an adult will simply think it. That is why you build a routine where each sequence of moves cancels out possible explanations. An excellent example of this is The Tuned Deck routine from Greater Magic, where the each sequence cancels out any method the audience might suspect for a previous sequence. That is a card routine, but the principle is the same.

If I place a coin in my right hand and it vanishes the audience will be surprised for a moment and then a moment later their logic will kick in and their attention turn to your left hand. But, if the coin is found elsewhere - a split second before the logic kicks in - you have headed them off at the pass so to speak, and that logic never gets underway as they are now focused on what will happen next.

Take the Slydini One Coin Routine. If he did just one vanish and stopped, the audience would start to think and very likely come to a conclusion that would satisfy them, regardless of whether it was correct or not. But Slydini does not stop, he continues and the routine gathers momentum. It is the compounding effect of relatively minor vanishes and reproductions that eventually overwhelms the audience.

And thank you for the compliments.

PS. In my routine I play on the fact that they will think it is in my other hand. I make that part of the presentation.
I hope to get to The Session in January, and if you are there, and I suspect you will be, ask me to show it to you.
SociallyAwkwardPenguin
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See, that's how you have a discussion where people disagree. Cordially, and with respect.

I'd love to see your routine Q. I guess you're not coming at the weekend to International? Boo.

One thing different about the Slydini routine is, because of the lapping, you get many displays with both hands empty, I think this makes it.
Quentin
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Sadly, I have to miss International this year.

Slydini's use of the lap does make a huge difference to his routine and it is probably more akin to a one coin ballet than a one coin routine.

But to get back to your point about the layman's use of critical thinking. Any magician who believes the layman will completely turn off his critical faculty is deluding himself. Whit Hayden delves deeply into this discussion in his book 'Chicago Surprise'. Juan Tamariz addresses the topic in 'The Magic Way', which hopefully will be reprinted soon.

Pre second world war magicians seem to have a much better grasp of this than 99% of contemporary magicians.

I'm not sure of the year but it was probably late 1950's when both Slydini and Dai Vernon were in London. Harry Stanley arranged for Slydini, Vernon and Ken Brooke to perform at a society/celebrity party. It may well have been at Cy Endfield's. Ken Brooke was standing next to a well known (at the time) male singer (whose name escapes me at the moment) and asked him what he thought of Slydini. "Which one is Slydini?" he asked. Ken pointed him out. "Oh, the funny foreign chap who keeps dropping things on his knee."
SociallyAwkwardPenguin
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I've heard, and love, that story. I explained your point about the interaction to my wife and she could imagine how much better that would play, so thanks for that point Q.
Quentin
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My discussion with Mr Penguin and comments from the Socially less Awkward Mrs Penguin led me to re-read Victor Farelli's little known (today) book, 'Convincing Coin Magic' (George Armstrong publisher 1946). Farelli was a most astute writer meticulous in his attention to detail. He also stole Val Andrews' girlfriend but that is another story.

Here are Farelli's comments on the transfer, well worth your consideration:

Some experts maintain that it is practically impossible to deceive an enlightened audience by means of the "transfer," namely, by pretending to place an article in one hand but really palming it in the other. For instance the late Mr. Nevil Maskelyne wrote:- "It would be interesting to know if any spectator is ever misled by this particular manoeuvre. Not very often one would imagine." (Our Magic, page 191).

It can be argued that as soon as one hand has been shown empty, the onlooker will come to the conclusion that the "vanished" object is concealed in the other, and this no matter how perfectly the sleight may have been accomplished.

There is probably a good deal of truth in the above contention, and I am inclined to believe that it is more convincing to produce a duplicate of the object in question from some other place where neither the right nor the left hand could possibly have placed it.

When at college in Spain - more years ago than I care to remember - I often entertained my comrades with little feats of pure sleight of hand. One day, when I had caused a 'silk' to disappear from my left hand, a fellow student called out:- "Muestre la otra mano!" (Show the other hand). I took no notice of the interruption, but I pulled, very quickly, a duplicate handkerchief from my collar. The 'heckler' frankly admitted that he had not the faintest idea of how the trick was done: the possible existence of a duplicate did not occur to him. I never forgot that lesson.
SociallyAwkwardPenguin
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Great point Q.
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