The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » Help Finding Prospecting Lists (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

ChrisC
View Profile
New user
66 Posts

Profile of ChrisC
Hey Everyone!

I've booked a decent amount of company holiday parties from restaurants I preform at, referrals, networking, and word of mouth. I am content with my calendar the way it is now.

I thought it would be too late to make a concentrated effort on booking more shows, but I had two people call me about performing at holiday parties this morning (One small insurance company, and a private party).

I figured there might be more people still planning, looking for entertainment at the last minute and the best way to find them would be picking up the phone.

I want to fill my calendar as much as possible, and plan on picking a list and dialing for 2-3 hours a day for the next week or so.

For those of you who have had success with cold calling, any advice on finding a list of prospects?


-My local (South Jersey)Chamber of Commerce has a list of 8-900 businesses in the directory, this is free but there is not that much information about the companies

- Philadelphia Business Journal also has an online directory

-Philadelphia Business Journal sells books of lists for Philly and url=http://www.bizjournals.com/commerce/bookoflists/view?market_code=newbrunswick]New Jersey[/url] priced from $40-$200 with details about peoples names, number of employees ext.

Questions

Anyone know of any other good ways to find lists of prospects?

If I get a book of list, should I target by size, type of company or both?

With the PBJ online directories and book of lists, you have to sort by type of business. Manufacturing companies, banks, law firms ext. For those of you with experience, does any one type of business or size have a significantly larger law of averages for prospecting?

I understand that if I call enough people I will eventually find someone who is still looking for entertainment, and just picking up the phone is more important than getting my ducks in a row. I am going to just pick a list and start phoning, and adapt accordingly as I get advice and learn as I go.

If anyone has any advice or tips I would greatly appreciate it.

I don't really expect to book a TON of shows this way. Possibly one or two more, but more important for me is learning good prospecting skills, and creating another system for booking shows in the future.

Thanks,
-Chris
Mindpro
View Profile
Inner circle
9995 Posts

Profile of Mindpro
I agree that many companies still book right up until the last minute, especially since 9-11. Rather than searching by type of business, I suggest you search by size of the company or number of employees.

It you do strolling or closeup you can tap int the now popular smaller parties, office parties, restaurant rooms, etc. These can really be done for companies of all sizes.

If you offer a stage show or after dinner/banquet show, I search for companies with over 100 employees. Typically the larger the company and the larger the party, the more booked in advance they are simply due to all of the coordinating that needs to be done (securing a venue, menus, etc.)

At this point picking up the phone and craigslist ads are your best bets. While many think it's obsolete broadcast fax still can drum up some last minute business. Don't discard it.

You can use the directory lists you mention or simply spend a day searching Google for area companies, offices, dealerships, factories, etc.

As you said, don't expect to book a lot of shows at this point, but I'm guessing you can still pickup a few due to last minute decisions, other entertainer cancellations, change of plans, someone dropping the ball, etc.
Carducci
View Profile
Special user
Denver
539 Posts

Profile of Carducci
I still find, to this day, that the best way to find a good prospecting list is to make one.

About a year ago, I wrote my exact process for building my prospect lists, down to my phone script for finding the right contact.

I hope this can be of some help:

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......forum=44
ChrisC
View Profile
New user
66 Posts

Profile of ChrisC
Thanks for the fast replies!

Mindpro

-Thanks for the craigslist idea! Talk about low hanging fruit. I'm not even sure what broadcast fax is but I will be researching it tomorrow after my first round of calls.

-What do you mean by 9/11?

-I do strolling and palmistry. I have a stage act too, but it's not polished enough to market towards a corporate audience. You said strolling could be done for companies of all sizes, but the bigger companies are more likely already booked. Seeing as how this is very last minute do you think just phoning every local business, or taking more time to research for places with <100 employees would get me a better result?

Carducci

-I've read your post before, and was planning on using a combination of your script, the prospecting guide from one of Bob Burgs books, and my own direct sales experience. It was very informative and defiantly will be shaving some time from my learning curve

-in that post you recommend buying a list. Is that what you mean by "making one" or do you mean using google to research? If buying, do you know how to find a good broker, and if researching do you have any advice?

-Chris
Bazinga
View Profile
Loyal user
277 Posts

Profile of Bazinga
Quote:
On 2013-11-25 22:32, ChrisC wrote:
I'm not even sure what broadcast fax is but I will be researching it tomorrow after my first round of calls.

Be carefull. In many, or even most, cases broadcast faxing can get you into trouble.

http://www.fcc.gov/guides/fax-advertising

Bazinga!
Mindpro
View Profile
Inner circle
9995 Posts

Profile of Mindpro
Broadcast Faxing has never gotten anyone into trouble that I know and we've used it for years for specific markets. Thanks for providing that link as it does clearly state that as long as a company publishes their fax number in ads or on the internet, unless they expressly say "no solicitation", they are permitting and allowing incoming faxes which allows for advertising and promotion:

"Specifically, a fax advertisement may be sent to an EBR customer if the sender also:

obtains the fax number directly from the recipient through, for example, an application, contact information form or membership renewal form; or
obtains the fax number from the recipient’s own directory, advertisement or site on the Internet, unless the recipient has noted on such materials that it does not accept unsolicited advertisements at the fax number in question; or..."

Yes, always approach this or any marketing properly and legally.

Chris C, what I meant by 9/11 is the September 11 World Trade Center tragedy date. It was a huge turning point here in America for corporate holiday events. Let me explain. Prior to 9/11 since the 1980's the trend in corporate America was having large, sometimes huge company Christmas Parties (that's what they were referred to then, today they would be the more politically correct "Holiday Parties"). These would be for hundreds of attendees, usually comprised of employees their spouses or significant others, all supervisors, management and often they would even invite board members, retirees and VIP guests such as some of their better or closer clients, distributors, or other key associates. They were grand events - cocktail hour, complete dinner, after dinner service awards presentations, raffles or sometimes even gift exchanges, etc. This is where many also issued the longtime staple - Christmas Bonuses. Then there was entertainment and often dancing for three or four hours. As I said, they were huge events where management interacted with employees, field or factory workers, mingled with executives. Yes, there were corporate politics and cliques all around these events, but they were well-structured, well-planned events (often starting in July or August, in huge hotel ballrooms or larger banquet centers, and were quite expensive events to host. Entertainment was one of the featured components of these events. Often they've have three or four different entertainers - magicians, strolling talent during cocktail hour, a stage show after awards, then a band or DJ for the remainder of the night.

Then the 9/11 attacks happened. The tone in America immediately afterwards was "should we be in mourning?" or " when is it okay to get back to normal with things such as laughing and entertainment? I remember Dave Letterman's first night back on the air with entertainment and comedy, everyone was on eggs shells not knowing how to act or respond. It was a touchy time in America as we didn't want to be disrespectful of our losses, but when and at what point do you try to move forward and try to get back to some kind of what used to be considered the norm.

This went on for weeks into October, November. Many companies decided they would cancel their plans for holiday events as it was still "too soon" after 9/11. Those that did decide to still have an event, scaled it waaay back often deciding to greatly reduce and in many cases cut out and eliminate the entertainment. They still wanted to have an event for their employees, but felt odd offering too much of a celebration.

This was a turning point, as corporate holiday events never were the same and have never returned to it's former status. Upon hearing that the company was cutting out their big company-wide celebration events, many managers and department heads went to bat for their staff saying they felt it was wrong not to have something for the employees. The result was many mangers asking if they could have something "just for our department". Management either yes and gave them a very small budget, or said yes, but they'd have to pay for it themselves (thus starting the concept of having to pay to attend your own party). The results are the now more popular late afternoon small celebration at the office itself or at a small room in a restaurant for 20, 30 40 or maybe 50 people. Of course these events have minimal space and little or no budget for entertainment, thus the holiday season which used to be vibrant and the much anticipated and very cash flowing time of year for pro entertainers, has never really been the same since.

I'm sure smaller acts like strolling entertainment may not have felt it noticed this as much as the larger stage performers that often used to make 30-50% of their annual income for the year between Thanksgiving and January 15th (as companies stared cutting back and being cost conscious, many started having their budget events after the holidays in January or even February when venues and catering are much less expensive rather than during the peak first three weeks in December.

The corporate market has never been the same. Some believe 9/11 was the turning point due to attitudes in America. Others believe that the corporate world used the 9/11 incident as a way and "excuse" to reduce, cutback or eliminate these large costly events and now had the perfect excuse and reasoning to do so.

Like anything, once given a reason or excuse to change it once, or cease something, it rarely ever gets back to it's former level or what it once was. It's sad and a shame as entertainers felt the hit, and this was even before the whole recession thing, which btw is also another of those reasons or excuses to make a change and ultimately never get back to what it once was.

I hope this better explains what I was referring to.

At this point pick you the phone and just start calling and see what you come up with. You get a lot of "no's","we're all set", etc, but you still may get some last minute ones. Yes, I'd focus on smaller. less than a hundred employee events - car dealerships, banks, credit unions, larger restaurants, medical offices, dental offices, etc.
Starrpower
View Profile
Inner circle
4070 Posts

Profile of Starrpower
That was possibly the best explanation of the 9/11 turning point (as far as it affects holiday parties) that I have heard. I once performed at a Christmas party that gave away vacation packages and a brand-new Jeep!

As for lists, I too am an advocate of building your own. The exception would be if you are tuned into a very specific market. For example, I used to present a program on scams and swindles, and my target market was independent banks. In that case, a purchased list was worth the price.
magic4u02
View Profile
Eternal Order
Philadelphia, PA
15111 Posts

Profile of magic4u02
Michael: Wonderful post on that other link. Very well done and very thought out. That is GOLD right there for those who take the time out to read it, study it and apply it.

Kyle
Kyle Peron

http://www.kylekellymagic.com

Entertainers Product Site

http://kpmagicproducts.com

Join Our Facebook Fan Page at

http://facebook.com/perondesign
Carducci
View Profile
Special user
Denver
539 Posts

Profile of Carducci
Thanks Kyle! I hope it's helped a few people out!

Chris, I should have been more clear, I usually buy a list of companies (because I like to target certain sized companies, in a certain area, who do certain types of business) and I can get as many companies and phone numbers as I can handle. I've never been able to buy a prospect list just because I've never found anyone who offers such a specific list (who plans their special events).

I like to buy companies lists, but I like to build my prospect lists.
Mindpro
View Profile
Inner circle
9995 Posts

Profile of Mindpro
I agree but have had difficulty finding good lists to buy or good list companies, with current & clean lists. Any suggestions?

We usually create our own lists, but I like experimenting with purchased lists if I could find a company I like and if they serve the markets I'm seeking.
magic4u02
View Profile
Eternal Order
Philadelphia, PA
15111 Posts

Profile of magic4u02
I am in the same boat. Currently, we generate our own list as we do for many markets. It would just be nice to explore a source for a clean list. We will have to share with each other if anyone finds one.

Kyle
Kyle Peron

http://www.kylekellymagic.com

Entertainers Product Site

http://kpmagicproducts.com

Join Our Facebook Fan Page at

http://facebook.com/perondesign
Bazinga
View Profile
Loyal user
277 Posts

Profile of Bazinga
Quote:
On 2013-11-26 08:37, Mindpro wrote:
Broadcast Faxing has never gotten anyone into trouble that I know and we've used it for years for specific markets. Thanks for providing that link as
*******
it does clearly state that as long as a company publishes their fax number in ads or on the internet, unless they expressly say "no solicitation", they are permitting and allowing incoming faxes which allows for advertising and promotion:
*******
"Specifically, a fax advertisement may be sent to an EBR customer if the sender also:

obtains the fax number directly from the recipient through, for example, an application, contact information form or membership renewal form; or
obtains the fax number from the recipient’s own directory, advertisement or site on the Internet, unless the recipient has noted on such materials that it does not accept unsolicited advertisements at the fax number in question; or..."

Yes, always approach this or any marketing properly and legally.

Yes, and the key is EBR, which is Established Business Relationship. Even when the fax number is on the receiving company's advertisements, "cold" faxing, without that pre-established relationship, is illegal.


I didn't include your 9/11 explination here but you are spot on with what you said. That's an excellent way of putting it.

Thanks for that.

Bazinga!
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » Help Finding Prospecting Lists (0 Likes)
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2020 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.2 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL