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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » What should every magician own? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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zapito12
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For walk-around/strolling type magic, even street magic, I would recommend anything by Jay Scott Berry. His main gimmicks include the Cloaking Device, the FS2, and the Eclipse Tip. His design for the Topit is also very good. His Ring and Ribbon routine is also fantastic! I use his products and methods and they are amazing! If you ever have a chance to attend any of his lectures, DO IT!

I have been to two of his lectures this year and they have opened my mind to a different perspective on magic! His methods and techniques make things look like REAL magic! No kidding! Look up his YouTube videos and you'll see what I mean!
silvercup
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Seriously, a good pair of comfortable shoes.
Flyswatter
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A magician should own...nothing.

Half joking aside.

I strongly discourage you to buy all the props that you think a magician "should" have. It is not the props that defines a person as magician, but the person him/herself. Besides, buying all these props and materials at once will definitely overwhelm you. Okay, it will definitely overwhelm me.

I say go slow, you don't have to let your mother blow all her money for you at once for Christmas (unless it's some REALLY great deals...)

Go to the bank and get some half dollars, if your hands are big, go get some Eisen dollars. Go buy yourself a brick of decks, I personally prefer the Tally-Ho's. The Bicycle Fan Backs are amazing as well.

Like mentioned above, books are awesome. But if you're a more visual learner like me, I prefer DVD's to begin with, and then go for books as you're more advanced in the field. The Complete Introduction to Coin magic by Michael Ammar got me into coins, and now I've been digesting Kainoa Harbottle's books for months.

If you can, go to lectures or conventions, make friends. It helps a lot. AND IT'S REALLY REALLY REALLY FUN!
Wizard of Oz
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Most people wish I didn't have
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This post is quite curious. Zephury practices basic sleights 5-6 hours a day, or 10 hours per day as he later posts. Goodness, that's 50 hours per week not including weekends. So, he can't have a job unless he's an insomniac, yet with his writing skills (his post is composed better than most) he is at least high school age, or college...but apparently not in school due to his intense practice schedule.

I for one, would like to know more.
Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.
Flyswatter
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Quote:
On 2013-12-04 20:40, Wizard of Oz wrote:
This post is quite curious. Zephury practices basic sleights 5-6 hours a day, or 10 hours per day as he later posts. Goodness, that's 50 hours per week not including weekends. So, he can't have a job unless he's an insomniac, yet with his writing skills (his post is composed better than most) he is at least high school age, or college...but apparently not in school due to his intense practice schedule.

I for one, would like to know more.



To be honest I always had a coin or a deck of cards in my hands whenever I'm studying. Helps me concentrate on the reading actually.
Terrible Wizard
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One can practice whilst having a job or being a student.
PaulSharke
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Quote:
On 2013-12-04 20:40, Wizard of Oz wrote:
Zephury practices basic sleights 5-6 hours a day... So, he can't have a job ...


When your job involves waiting for something to happen as much as mine does, there's plenty of time to practice at work.
metaljohn
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Card College volumes 1 and 2 (only ask for 3, 4 and 5 later on). I've enjoyed Card College more for the theory and insight on sleights than for the tricks. I still go back to these books for sleights even if they're explained in other books. I just like the way Roberto Giobbi thinks.

I still say go for books, but get all 4 of Harry Loraynes's Best Ever DVDs.

Get some sponge balls and learn the routine in the book you already have (Mark Wilson's Complete Course.

A chop Cup and Don Allan's routine (a booklet they sell on Ring-N-Things I believe). Eventually, you can learn other routines.

A cups and balls set always good too.
tstark
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In the original post you were asking about props. I would have to recommend first off the cups and balls. Many performers will tell you that this is the type of trick that forces you to learn the basics, theory, presentation, misdirection, routining, etc. A good set to purchase is a combo set so you have the regular cups and a chop cup. If you want to be as good as your grandfather I can only assume he entertained with magic. The first mistake all beginners make is thinking that the trick or sleight does the work. Mike Skinner was a complete testimonial to what one needs to be a successful performer, and much of what he did is simple and basic.

Additional classic props might include a Devano Deck, Color Changing Knives, a thumb tip and other utilities as was recommended previously. Tarbell is still one of the best investments for learning. Okito Box, standard coin gimmicks like Copper/Silver and shells. Sponge balls were recommended previously as well and they always play strong when in capable hands. A Benson Bowl routine frames the sponges wonderfully and allows for a surprise production at the end to complete the routine or transition to something else.

Be aware of what has been around for a long time and that will give you an idea of what stands the test of time. Find out why those tricks are still around. Don't overlook anything that suits your style and character.
Mr. Danny
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Hi Zephury, What props? I do Street Magic and it's amazing what I don't need. Can't go wrong with utilities and multiple use items.
dazulay
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Hi, I would like to remark that thinking and using coins the name of David Roth, Jeff Mc Bride, Michael Ammar and Rubinstein are a must. Practice dexterity and presentation with cards,ropes,sponges,coins and Cups and Balls and your wizardry will flourish. Again, in stage personality combined with simplicity I would recommend to see Ted Lesley, Patrick Page, and Paul Potassy among others you may like.
Zephury
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Hollywood, FL
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Quote:
On 2013-12-04 20:40, Wizard of Oz wrote:
This post is quite curious. Zephury practices basic sleights 5-6 hours a day, or 10 hours per day as he later posts. Goodness, that's 50 hours per week not including weekends. So, he can't have a job unless he's an insomniac, yet with his writing skills (his post is composed better than most) he is at least high school age, or college...but apparently not in school due to his intense practice schedule.

I for one, would like to know more.



I was in a private school which allowed me to go ahead on my school work, I graduated early. In school I was ALWAYS doing knuckle rolls, all day long.. Got quite a bit of attention from the coin dropping on my desk when I first started. At lunch time, I would do card magic every day for friends. For the past few months, I was practicing 5-6 hours a day in my room, but no matter where I go (Now and back then), I always practice. I always carry card decks, coins and what not, it's a rare sight to see me without something in my hands involving magic. And as of the past couple weeks or so, I've quite all my video games and other things, The only words I can really say is that I'm obsessed with it. I'm looking for a job and all, but for the past few days, the idea of a career in performing has popped in my head. Not sure how logical it is, but it's definitely going from a hobby into a dream. The reason my grandfather does not help me is because he got involved with drugs in the mid 90's after having a bad accident. Doing tree work, he fell out of the tree along with a limb or something, I'm not sure and it badly damaged the performance of his right hand, and his right arm is basically half way gone from surgeries. He ruined his career for magic that way and has become quite arrogant in the process.. Doesn't really want to teach me. When I was 8 and 9 years old, he tried teaching me but got frusturated because I didn't practice enough. I was little and wanted instant gratification, self working card tricks. He found out that I'm really in to magic now.. In a couple weeks, he is coming to get all of his magic stuff out of our garage. My family tells me that he's only coming to take it so that I can't ramble through it and learn. I don't want to believe that.. But I really wish he'd lend me some of his books. half of our attic is a library of every book I could possibly need. I really don't feel like spending 200$ on Tarbell's course in magic. Sorry for a bit of a ramble, but that's what's going on with me, aha. Thanks for all the great responses.
Flyswatter
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Tarbell's free in pdf form....just saying.
Tom Fenton
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Have a look here:

http://www.thinklikeaconjurer.com/performancescripts.htm

Excellent routines and really nice folks.
"But there isn't a door"
MarkRochon
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I'll second getting anything by Harry Lorayne - the 4 DVDs, books: Close-up Card Magic; The Magic Book. And yes, you need Cups and Balls, and Sponge Balls, and a thumb tip - and learn to use them all well - you need a little something more than just cards and coins. And get a subscription to Genii magazine.
cafeinst
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Stars of Magic by George Starke. Every close up magician should own it. it is the best book on magic that I own. Everything in it is practical and great.
motown
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Atlanta by way of Detroit
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Daryl's Fooler Doolers DVD set

Wayne Dobson's A Life in Magic DVD set

Danny Tong's Finally Vol. 1 & 2 DVDs

Garrett Thomas' 3 DVD set

Johnny Thompson's Classics of Magic DVD set

Audience Management by Gay Ljungberg, this is an excellent book.

Scripting Magic by Pete McCabe, another excellent book
"If you ever write anything about me after I'm gone, I will come back and haunt you."
– Karl Germain
magicdave56
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A sexy Assistant.
motown
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I'll second that. Smile
"If you ever write anything about me after I'm gone, I will come back and haunt you."
– Karl Germain
HerbS
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Someone above mentioned making friends in magic, which is a very good point and definitely worth pursuing. When I was younger I didn't have a community of fellow magicians to tie into and I know that if I had, I would have gotten further along much more quickly. Other people can be a resource for teaching you stuff, which is great, but I think it is more important in a sense just to see what kinds of things they are doing. For example, there were a lot of sleights and tricks that I overlooked in various books because they didn't seem practical or workable. It took me decades to learn that in fact these same things can be very effective. By hanging out with other magicians you will learn a lot just from the conversations about what books they're reading, DVDs they like, tricks they're practicing, acts they saw, etc. Plus, it's always great to have friends who don't think it's in any way unusual if you always have a deck of cards in your hand!
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