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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » See how the AncestryDNA test works to help you discover more about your past (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Kjellstrom
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Inner circle
Sweden, Scandinavia, Europe
4963 Posts

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I recommend you to do this test, interesting:

http://dna.ancestry.com/

Check out the video trailer...

Get personalized details about your unique ethnic origins. Discover more about your story with advanced DNA science from the experts in family history.
Payne
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Seattle
4572 Posts

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My wife got me the National Geographic version of this for Christmas last year. It really rather interesting once you get the results back.

Click the box to stt the results
Image


https://genographic.nationalgeographic.com
"America's Foremost Satirical Magician" -- Jeff McBride.
motown
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Atlanta by way of Detroit
5967 Posts

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What did you guys learn from this test?
"If you ever write anything about me after I'm gone, I will come back and haunt you."
– Karl Germain
Bob1Dog
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Wife: It's me or this houseful of
1159 Posts

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My wife and I had our mitochondrial (maternal) dna checked by an outfit called GeneTree about seven years ago. I beleve GeneTree was later merged with or bought by Ancestry.com. I'll get into what I learned in a minute, but I have to tell y'all I'm outraged by Ancestry.com. I've been studying genealogy for decades and way back in the nineties, I submitted family tree information to a project called World Family Tree, run by Broderbund Software who produced the popluar genealogy program, FamilyTreeMaker. It was an excellent program permitting folks to track their family history. The project was designed to help fellow FTM users connect as a free service. Long story short, Broderbund goes away, eaten up by Ancestry.com and all the records folks like me submitted to contribute to a data base along with it. Now, to access the information those of us submitted, we have to pay Ancestry.com with a subscription. I wouldn't pay a nickel to Ancestry.com.

I expect the dna results my wife and I obtained from GeneTree are also accessible through Ancestry.com for a fee.

That off my chest, here's what we learned.

Another very long story short, my mitochondrial dna traces to Haplogroup U, appearing about 55,000 to 60,000 years ago and broadly distributed ranging from Europe and North Africa to India and Central Asia. It's all very complicated, but when you get a dna study done, it is interesting to see where your dna originated and to learn of your "Haplogroup." They will also tell you of notable members of your group. In my case, in 1903, the skeletal remains of a 9,000-year old male were found in a cave in Cheddar, England. The so-called Cheddar Man was about 23 years old at the time of his death and was killed by a blow to the face. Subsequent studies from the dna found in one of his teeth, found a unique match to a local schoolteacher, Adrian Targett. I suppose if I were to track her down in British records, I might make a connection. But knowing from experience what goes into this research, I'll let it go.

My wife's mitochondrial dna is more interesting than mine, tracing back to the Haplogroup H, and the most common mitochondrial dna lineage in western Eurasian populations, particularly in southwestern Europe. Overall, more than 40% of the total European population carries this mitochondrial variation. It most likely originated about 30,000 years ago. Famous members of Haplogroup H are Marie Antoinette and her maternal ancestors back to Bertha von Putelendor, who died circa 1190. If genealogical pedigrees are correct, maternal relatives such as Maria Theresa of Austria and Marie-Louise of Austria (second wife of Napoleon Bonaparte) are also members of this Haplogroup.

Genetic studies of the remains of the Romanov family indidcate that Tsarina Alexandra, wife of the last Russian Tsar Nicholas II also belonged to the same Haplogroup. Thus, ther children and all ancestors along her maternal line back to her last recorded ancestor Bianca Nunez de Lara (born appx. 1317) belong to Haplogroup H. This line also includes Queen Victoria and her many relatives.

For what it's worth, my wife's maternal ancestry hails back to Ireland, Poland and Germany; mine hails from Scotland and France. We're both Caucasian.

So there you have it. There's a lot more information contained in the report far too complicated to go into here, but it is interesting. One of these days we'll get the paternal dna tests done.
What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about? Smile

My neighbor rang my doorbell at 2:30 a.m. this morning, can you believe that, 2:30 a.m.!? Lucky for him I was still up playing my drums.
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » See how the AncestryDNA test works to help you discover more about your past (0 Likes)
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