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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » You are getting sleepy...very sleepy... » » Hypnotizing house plants (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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mindpunisher
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Danny hasn't lost it Smile
Mindpro
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This is a typical magician turned hypnotist. Likely rather new to hypnosis within the last five years, but of course like any magician claims they've been "performing" since a young kid. I think I know who this is and this is in line with what I heard. Devin Knight follower from what I've heard.

Like others, you must have a position on these boards. Either you want to admit to being new and still in the beginning learning phases, or you are a seasoned professional. Conflicting positions and posts are not beneficial to anyone.

Hypnotizing plants to me shows minimal experience in theater.

I still don't get why members do not follow the guidelines and preferred practices of coming on here and first introducing themselves and offering some information about themselves, their level of experience and some background. It gets things off on a much better foot. Yet when they take offense to the replies they get they often fail to see it's because of how they came on here and approached it.

His very post said so much between the lines. this is why he's likely got no response and then they types of responses he's receiving." Hypno-tricks are useful when you need to break up that pattern" explains a lot to most of us.
Mozart
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Okay, let’s begin again. In 1996, the New Encyclopedia of Stage Hypnosis was published. In it, the author includes several examples of hypno-tricks – including the pseudo hypnosis of animals and plants. In the case of plants, he describes a spray system concealed under one’s clothing to atomize ether to accomplish this effect.

A more recent non-fiction book (sorry-the title eludes me) describes the secrets of Indian Mystics. In one case, a holy man is observed by the author ascending a dias surrounded by worshipers and flowers. The worshipers bow in reverence as he passes by and amazingly, the flowers on both sides on the dias “bow” as well. Upon closer inspection, the author observes small nozzles buried in the flowerbeds. He also cites ether as the catalyst.

I’m trying to duplicate this effect - but so far with no success. Can anyone tell me whether this is fanciful legend or is there evidence to support it? Has anyone done it and if so, can you describe your method?

Constructive information pertinent to the question is welcome and appreciated.
Jesse Lewis
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The Secret Language of Life

cover of book The Secret Language of Life

How Animals and Plants feel and communicate
Brian J. Ford
Fromm International, New York, 1999.
ISBN: 0-88064-254-8.
From pages: 204 - 206

Pea plants are convenient for casual study, for their tendril can store the memory of a stimulus. If a pea tendril is stroked it will start to curl, though if the plant is chilled this responses does not occur. The memory remains, however, and if the plant is later allowed to warm up, the tendril then curls as if recalling or having stored the earlier stimulus. The tip of a pea tendril grows into a sharp little hook, helping to attach it to its support. If you stroke an outstretched pea tendril you will see it start to coil within a minute or so. Try it at night and nothing happens. The tendrils need to be in the light before they will respond to stroking. They can store the effect of the stimulus for more than an hour and, if brought into the light 90 minutes after the stimulus, they will start to coil as though they had just been touched . . .

In plants like the Virginia creeper Parthenocissus . . . [it is not clear, but it may be that Ford is referring to Parthenocissus here] . . . if even a single touch-cell is stimulated, the effect is transmitted to all other cells in the tendril, so coiling starts simultaneously all along its length. These cells can clearly communicate with their neighbours. The sense can be more highly developed that the sense of touch in humans. The touch of a single wisp of wool, less that you can detect on your skin, is enough to start some tendrils responding. The organs of touch in humans can detect a fine hair weighing 0.002 mg drawn across the skin. The sensitive hairs of Drosera, the sundew, can detect a stimulus of 0.0008 mg, while Sicyos tendrils respond to 0.00025 mg, which is eight times lighter than humans can detect. Not only have plants the ability to sense what's going on, bus some do it far better than we can.

The electrical nature of the stimulus has been demonstrated in several ways. There are action potentials which can be measured in a stimulated tendril, for one thing; and if an electrical signal is actually fed to a tendril, it can itself induce coiling. The pioneering experiments by the Italian physiologist Luigi Galvani (1737 - 98) at the University of Bologna in the late eighteenth century showed that electricity could stimulate frog muscle and make it twitch. Now we have a made similar observations in the tendrils of flowering plants.

There is a further comparison between plant and animal movement, namely that plants can be anaesthetised much like humans. It has been known for many decades that a dose of ether, chloroform, or morphine can render a plant senseless.
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Mozart
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Thank you Jessie. That is an articulate, intelligent and well-cited reply. I'll check out the reference.
Dannydoyle
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I want to know where your statement about most of us not knowing it is about staging and lighting and etc. comes from. YOU brought it up so it is perfectly logical for us to question your credentials.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
mindpunisher
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Don't believe everything you read in that old book. I remember a "challenge induction" using chloroform. Its a nice book but not that practical.

Again putting the killing of a plant aside you said hypnosis shows tend to get boring after about 60 mins when most of us say the opposite. So I can only come to the conclusion you are not very skilled in doing hypnosis shows. And I would find it hard to believe that any real seasoned hypnotist would even think about hypnotizing a plant...

Quote:
There is a further comparison between plant and animal movement, namely that plants can be anaesthetised much like humans. It has been known for many decades that a dose of ether, chloroform, or morphine can render a plant senseless.


Now there is a scarey picture - a senseless plant Smile
Gordon the discombobulator
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Ask yourself, "does the plant want to be hypnotized ?"
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