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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Penny for your thoughts » » Cold Reading: Ian Rowland or Docc Hilford? (5 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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conrad3000
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Quote:
On Jul 6, 2014, gypsyfish wrote:

If, on the other hand, you want to be able to tell people about themselves like Sherlock Holmes or Patrick Jane, Passages by Gail Sheehy is a great place to start. Pick up a book like The Writer's Guide to Character Traits and learn it and apply it to the people you want to read. It has personality profiles and psychological studies on different types of people.


Yes. That is what I'm thinking. Thank you. Any other suggestions?
- Ryan
innermind
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Hi Ryan (conrad3000).....I see you've been with the Café for almost 10 years, but don't post much. I'm the same way..I've been a member for over 3 years with a fairly low post total. Hopefully this is good...meaning you keep busy.

As mentioned already, Julian Moore's James Bond Cold Reading will be helpful, as well as Gail Sheehy's book, Passages.

Also very helpful will be Iain Dunford's AEIOU and Richard Webster's Psychometry From A to Z. The links are available earlier in this thread in the signature's of both Iain and Doug Dyment (Doug's Deceptionary site offers Richard Webster's works).

But, as other folks have mentioned, it's a good idea to first learn a system based on an oracle and then combine that with some of the info learned from Webster's A to Z, James Bond, and Sheehy's Passages.

A really cool system to learn is Cartomancy (you can do a reading on somebody using a regular deck of cards)...Julian Moore has a very good book on Cartomancy, aimed at beginners. Also....something different you might like, would be tree readings....check out Andy Fisher's book, Doodle Me a Tree (Lulu sells it). With tree reading, you give a person a reading based on the type of tree you have them draw on a piece of paper.

It's also wise to learn something about colors and how to incorporate them into readings. For this I would suggest Riding the Rainbow by TC Tahoe, which is an ebook available at lybrary.com

Good luck!





David
"Everything is funny as long as it is happening to somebody else." -Will Rogers
IAIN
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Eternal Order
england
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Cheers for the mention...i put out a booklet on a cartomantic system recently too if that tickles the collective fancy...theres a review in the appropriate section...

Enrique enriquez's invisible tarot is well worth your time...
Ian Rowland
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Hi Conrad3000,

May I suggest you take a while to read around the subject of 'cold reading' -- what it is, and what it is not. There are plenty of free resources all over the web. Just tap 'cold reading' into Google and read a few articles. I think this will help you a little.

I heartily recommend several of the resources that have already been mentioned. Richard Webster's books are wonderful, and some of them are very good for beginners and those looking to develop their interest in the subject.

Do take a look at Doug Dyment's list of cold reading resources. Doug is VERY well-informed, it's an excellent list and you can't really go wrong if you allow Doug to be your tour guide.

Ron Martin's book, if you can get hold of it, is truly excellent and full of great information.

My book is an attempt to describe, in rather a systematic and analytical way, how cold reading works. It's not really an instructional book, although it can be used that way. Of course, it is for others to say whether my attempt was/is successful, and of course opinions will vary.

Someone above has mentioned Gail Sheehy's book 'Passages', which is popular with many cold readers. I've read it, and it does have some useful info, but bear in mind it is very parochial. She's writing from a 70s, US East Coast perspective. If you can relate to that, great, but if not then a lot of the material in the book might not apply to you and the people you meet.

If you want to become a good, proficient reader, then the most important thing is to DO IT. It's great that you want to consult good sources and learn from good teachers, but you can't become a good reader without giving readings. Don't worry about not being very good at first. No one is. It's called the learning curve, and you just have to go through it and not get discouraged. Eventually, you'll be able to give a great reading to anyone, anywhere, anywhen, and what's more you'll enjoy it and so will they. Cold reading is like sex: if it's not fun, enjoyable and satisfying for both of you, then you're doing it wrong.
www.ianrowland.com . Working Magic.
MatCult
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Smile

Ian did an accidental (or maybe deliberate) Swiss Tony...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iBw-aEixWuo
"Disbelief in magic can force a poor soul into believing in government and business."
ddyment
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Engali asked:
Quote:
Can anyone speak to the difference/similarities between Cold Front and the flash cards that are included in Bev's Speed Learning Palm Reading (I think that's the name of this product).


Bev's cards are more like true flash cards, with a sort of "question/topic" on one side, and the answers on the other, in somewhat "bullet point" form. And of course they are designed to teach his interpretation of the cards. They are formatted for you to print on ten 4x6-inch index cards.

The Cold Front cards are not flash cards; rather, they are a learning tool for Richard Webster's classic "Quick and Effective Cold Reading", designed to help the user attain the confidence level necessary to give those all-important first readings. They come already printed on (approximately) pocket-sized 3x5-inch heavy card stock; there are 11 cards, one of which is a map of the hand as seen by the reader (contrary to most representations--including Bev's--which show the reader's own hand, exactly the reverse of what you will encounter in real life).

A simplified summary: Bev's cards are more about detailed interpretation points, and Cold Front is more about the use of language.
Doug Dyment's Deceptionary :: Elegant, Literate, Contemporary Mentalism ... and More
IAIN
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Much like sex, there are many Passages to explore...Gail has written and expanded upon the core ideas behind the original...some have smutty titles too
conrad3000
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Thanks Ian. Big fan of your work. It's nice to get information from the source here at The Magic Café.

-Ryan
- Ryan
gabelson
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I highly recommend a little overlooked gem of Luke Jermay's, called "The Oracle Notes". It's important to get a solid foundation in cold reading, regardless, and read ALL the aforementioned books... but using Luke's method, you can go out and look like an experienced reader immediately. Very clever thinking here.
Engali
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Quote:
On Jul 7, 2014, ddyment wrote:
Engali asked:
Quote:
Can anyone speak to the difference/similarities between Cold Front and the flash cards that are included in Bev's Speed Learning Palm Reading (I think that's the name of this product).


Bev's cards are more like true flash cards, with a sort of "question/topic" on one side, and the answers on the other, in somewhat "bullet point" form. And of course they are designed to teach his interpretation of the cards. They are formatted for you to print on ten 4x6-inch index cards.

The Cold Front cards are not flash cards; rather, they are a learning tool for Richard Webster's classic "Quick and Effective Cold Reading", designed to help the user attain the confidence level necessary to give those all-important first readings. They come already printed on (approximately) pocket-sized 3x5-inch heavy card stock; there are 11 cards, one of which is a map of the hand as seen by the reader (contrary to most representations--including Bev's--which show the reader's own hand, exactly the reverse of what you will encounter in real life).

A simplified summary: Bev's cards are more about detailed interpretation points, and Cold Front is more about the use of language.


Thanks, Doug. I really appreciate the thoughtful reply.
bevbevvybev
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Thanks for the mentions everyone.

To clarify: My flashcards tie in with the palmistry system outlined in the book of the same name. Saying that, my system is about learning to talk the talk in your own words, whereas Webster's is more about learning stock lines. Which is why it's called 'Speed Learning - Palmistry In Your Own Words'.

I've always been terrible with stock lines, hence I wrote the book! The flash cards are memory jogs to remember the salient points, but it's the book itself that teaches you how to get your mouth in gear and think for yourself.

All my books comes with flash cards, most of them with audiobooks too included once you register each product. The flash cards are in pdf form, and most people who are smart phone savvy load them into their phones for quick reference on the go.

Hope that helps! Good luck. Don't read too much before putting it all into practice, you'll go blind.

Bev (Julian Moore)
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