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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Penny for your thoughts » » Drawing duplication: reveal style and performing style (15 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Mike Ince
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The Comedy Bible and Comedy Writing Secrets are two oft-recommended resources for finding the funny within you. Of course you could buy some old Robert Orben books and tell the same jokes magicians have been using since the 1940's.

Two things make people laugh: surprise and a feeling of superiority. Ever notice people laugh at the unexpected even when it isn't intended to be funny? In my last Q&A I paused and threw a folded card to the floor, saying, "I'm not getting anything from this one." The audience laughed. I think that's because I surprised them. Either that or my fly was down (I was blindfolded).

Judy Carter's book began early on with an exercise to list a subject and then four headings: weird, hard, scary, and stupid. The exercise leads you to write as many thoughts as possible under each heading. Ex.: What's weird about drawing the way you're doing it? What's hard about drawing or trying to guess what someone is thinking? What might be scary about the experiment? Is there anything stupid about making the drawings or about the drawing you've made?

If you write as many ideas as possible, whether they're funny or not, you'll find a few funny bits that you can refine. If that works for you, buy The Comedy Bible and keep going with the exercises.
The secret of deception is in making the truth seem ridiculous.
CMT VN
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Quote:
On Sep 17, 2014, Mike Ince wrote:
The Comedy Bible and Comedy Writing Secrets are two oft-recommended resources for finding the funny within you. Of course you could buy some old Robert Orben books and tell the same jokes magicians have been using since the 1940's.

Two things make people laugh: surprise and a feeling of superiority. Ever notice people laugh at the unexpected even when it isn't intended to be funny? In my last Q&A I paused and threw a folded card to the floor, saying, "I'm not getting anything from this one." The audience laughed. I think that's because I surprised them. Either that or my fly was down (I was blindfolded).

Judy Carter's book began early on with an exercise to list a subject and then four headings: weird, hard, scary, and stupid. The exercise leads you to write as many thoughts as possible under each heading. Ex.: What's weird about drawing the way you're doing it? What's hard about drawing or trying to guess what someone is thinking? What might be scary about the experiment? Is there anything stupid about making the drawings or about the drawing you've made?

If you write as many ideas as possible, whether they're funny or not, you'll find a few funny bits that you can refine. If that works for you, buy The Comedy Bible and keep going with the exercises.


Thank you very much for your recommendation. It is in line with what I have been trying to do and them some. I really appreciate your advice. I don't have the comedy bible yet but I will look into it next
jstreiff
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Don't bother with the Orbin stuff - too out of date and, in this case especially, to American. IMHO, the best comedy comes from yourself and life situations that resonate with your audiences. This is very specific to countries and cultures.
John
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I'm doing my show this weekend, Gonna film it and share it here. Thank you all for your valuable input
sjdavison
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I couldn't agree more that the mentalism itself shouldn't be funny, however there should be scope for humour in the performance. As derren brown wrote, 'it should be presented seriously, not necessarily solemnly.' People should know what you are doing is important and the performance should match this

However, there should be humour in the performance, and as said do not try and copy anyone else's lines. Find what works for you, as only you can deliver them correctly with the proper timing and manner. Review your effects, write the scripts down and identify moments where humour would be appropriate and add to the experience of the spectator.

Simon
Simon, 32, UK



www.sidavisonmagic.com
insight
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Stefmagic,

Your recommendation is well-intentioned, I think, but you have a very rudimentary understanding on this topic. Being unique is key. The fastest way to failure is to try to try to be a clone of someone even when you are inherently very different from that person, personality-wise and otherwise. I suggest that you keep performing and practicing so that you can continue to improve and be YOU.

Regards,
Mike

Quote:
On Sep 16, 2014, Stefmagic wrote:
Everybody told not to copy someone else but in business, the better and faster way to get successful is by modeling someone who had success before !!! You don't want to be someone else clone, but you have to find some models to help you shape what you'll become. With time, experience and maturity, you'll then shape your own personnality and performing style... But you must do modeling first.
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