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Chessmann
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On Oct 28, 2014, landmark wrote:
The first 45 minutes of Full Metal Jacket is brilliant. But then it falls apart in my opinion.


This movie will live forever for (IMHO) one reason: R. Lee Ermey's performance.

(on another, somewhate related note, I've been wanting to watch "Tribes" - a boot camp movie - with Jan Michael Vincent and Darren McGavin for some time now.)
My ex-cat was named "Muffin". "Vomit" would be a better name for her. AKA "The Evil Ball of Fur".
LobowolfXXX
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On Oct 28, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
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On Oct 27, 2014, LobowolfXXX wrote:
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On Oct 28, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
Why is that "interesting," landmark? I'm hardly alone in my assessment of those films.


It's interesting to him because while he doesn't hold out much hope re: the tastes of the masses, he expected a little more out of you. Smile



Sorry not to live up to your expectations. Smile They remain, nonetheless, among the top one hundred films ever made. (IMO, of course, even though most film historians also agree.)


Not MY expectations; I was just (facetiously) putting words in Landmark's mouth. I like 2001 and A Clockwork Orange ok (though I prefer Full !Metal Jacket to either).

I also agree with you in spades about Abbott and Costello Meet Framkenstein and Jerry Lewis movies.
"Torture doesn't work" lol
Guess they forgot to tell Bill Buckley.

"...as we reason and love, we are able to hope. And hope enables us to resist those things that would enslave us."
LobowolfXXX
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Quote:
On Oct 28, 2014, Chessmann wrote:
Quote:
On Oct 28, 2014, landmark wrote:
The first 45 minutes of Full Metal Jacket is brilliant. But then it falls apart in my opinion.


This movie will live forever for (IMHO) one reason: R. Lee Ermey's performance.

(on another, somewhate related note, I've been wanting to watch "Tribes" - a boot camp movie - with Jan Michael Vincent and Darren McGavin for some time now.)


Ermey is brilliant, unfortunately overshadowing some other excellent performances (most notably Matthew Modine's).
"Torture doesn't work" lol
Guess they forgot to tell Bill Buckley.

"...as we reason and love, we are able to hope. And hope enables us to resist those things that would enslave us."
mastermindreader
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The screenplay is significantly more developed than the novella. In fact, I think it's much better.

Quote:
The Shawshank Redemption garnered widespread critical acclaim from critics. Entertainment Weekly reviewer Owen Gleiberman praised the choice of scenery, writing that the "moss-dark, saturated images have a redolent sensuality" that makes the film very realistic.[15] While praising Morgan Freeman's acting and oratory skills as making Red appear real, Gleiberman felt that with the "laconic-good-guy, neo-Gary Cooper role, Tim Robbins is unable to make Andy connect with the audience."[15]

The film garnered a 91% approval rating from 64 critics—an average rating of 8.2 out of 10—on review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes.[16] Metacritic provides a score of 80 out of 100 from 19 critics, which indicates "generally favorable" reviews.[17] The film has been critically acclaimed for depicting Jean-Paul Sartre's ideas about existentialism more fully than any other contemporary movie.[18]...

...In 1998, Shawshank was not listed in AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies, but nine years later (2007), it was #72 on the revised list, outranking both Forrest Gump (#76) and Pulp Fiction (#94), the two most critically acclaimed movies from the year of Shawshank's release. In 1999, film critic Roger Ebert listed Shawshank on his "Great Movies" list.[25] It has been #1 on IMDb's user-generated Top 250 since 2008, when it surpassed The Godfather.[26]

Readers of Empire magazine voted the film as the best film of the 1990s, and it placed number 4 on Empire '​s list of "The 500 Greatest Movies of All Time" in 2008.[24][27] In March 2011, the film was voted by BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra listeners as their favorite film of all time.[28] Additionally, the Writers Guild of America included Frank Darabont's screenplay on its 101 Greatest Screenplays list, at number twenty-two.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Shawsha......response
slowkneenuh
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Mastermindreader said: "Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (And any Jerry Lewis movie)".

Good grief. Part of growing up for my generation was Saturday matinees watching Abbott and Costello, Jerry Lewis (and westerns) and enjoying every minute of them. Abbott and Costello endured, westerns hung on for a long time and Jerry Lewis not so much. After so many decades childhood memories should be preserved and not criticized. Smile

My still favorite movie is Wizard of Oz and the one that terrorized me from childhood is The Thing, with James Arness.
John

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mastermindreader
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I agree about the Wizard of Oz and The Thing. Both great movies.

I wasn't criticizing Abbott and Costello. I was criticizing that particular film which, justifiably, marked the end of Universal's golden age of horror films. (Even Costello said that his five year old daughter could have written a better script.)
LobowolfXXX
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On Oct 28, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
The screenplay is significantly more developed than the novella. In fact, I think it's much better.

Quote:
The Shawshank Redemption garnered widespread critical acclaim from critics. Entertainment Weekly reviewer Owen Gleiberman praised the choice of scenery, writing that the "moss-dark, saturated images have a redolent sensuality" that makes the film very realistic.[15] While praising Morgan Freeman's acting and oratory skills as making Red appear real, Gleiberman felt that with the "laconic-good-guy, neo-Gary Cooper role, Tim Robbins is unable to make Andy connect with the audience."[15]

The film garnered a 91% approval rating from 64 critics—an average rating of 8.2 out of 10—on review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes.[16] Metacritic provides a score of 80 out of 100 from 19 critics, which indicates "generally favorable" reviews.[17] The film has been critically acclaimed for depicting Jean-Paul Sartre's ideas about existentialism more fully than any other contemporary movie.[18]...

...In 1998, Shawshank was not listed in AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies, but nine years later (2007), it was #72 on the revised list, outranking both Forrest Gump (#76) and Pulp Fiction (#94), the two most critically acclaimed movies from the year of Shawshank's release. In 1999, film critic Roger Ebert listed Shawshank on his "Great Movies" list.[25] It has been #1 on IMDb's user-generated Top 250 since 2008, when it surpassed The Godfather.[26]

Readers of Empire magazine voted the film as the best film of the 1990s, and it placed number 4 on Empire '​s list of "The 500 Greatest Movies of All Time" in 2008.[24][27] In March 2011, the film was voted by BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra listeners as their favorite film of all time.[28] Additionally, the Writers Guild of America included Frank Darabont's screenplay on its 101 Greatest Screenplays list, at number twenty-two.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Shawsha......response


In what way do you think the novella was underdeveloped relative to the screenplay? I haven't read it in a while, but as I recall, the movie essentially bought the novella to light right off the page. The cinematography and music were great, and added to the overall experience, but aside from "stuff that can be in the movies but not in the book," I thought it was pretty much a dead-on match.
"Torture doesn't work" lol
Guess they forgot to tell Bill Buckley.

"...as we reason and love, we are able to hope. And hope enables us to resist those things that would enslave us."
mastermindreader
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Well, for one, the movie fleshed out a lot more of the story and added a good amount of detail. (And it changed things as well. Recall that Morgan Freeman's "Red" was a white guy in the novella, so named because of his red hair.)
HudsonView
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The Big Chill
Magnus Eisengrim
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On Oct 28, 2014, LobowolfXXX wrote:
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On Oct 28, 2014, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
the powerful ethical background of the book...


Powerful ethical backgrounds played better in the 30s and 40s. If LOTR came out today, Tolkien would be branded a racist and prosecuted for a hate crime, or he'd have written it with an inter-tribal council that spent months debating what the elves, dwarves, and men had done to contribute to the orcs' discontent, and possibly given them The Shire to make up for their past misconduct.


:) Agree (although somewhat less hyperbolically). My point is that the ethical codes of all involved are fundamental to the storytelling, xenophobia and all. Lopping the head off an unarmed messenger is simply impossible in the context of Tolkien's story. But it provided comic relief in the film.
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
landmark
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On Oct 28, 2014, slowkneenuh wrote:
Mastermindreader said: "Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (And any Jerry Lewis movie)".

Good grief. Part of growing up for my generation was Saturday matinees watching Abbott and Costello, Jerry Lewis (and westerns) and enjoying every minute of them. Abbott and Costello endured, westerns hung on for a long time and Jerry Lewis not so much. After so many decades childhood memories should be preserved and not criticized. Smile

Yes, that A&C movie gave me such pleasure as a child, I could never criticize it.
landmark
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On Oct 28, 2014, HudsonView wrote:
The Big Chill

I don't know if you remember, but the Big Chill came out not too long after the debut of another movie about young college age radicals getting back together again: John Sayles's The Return of the Secaucus Seven. The Sayles movie was funny and true--I felt I had known each one of those characters in real life. The Kasdan film was much slicker (but I think, ripped off from the Sayles film). I preferred the Sayles film.
Daryl -the other brother
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"The Shining". I thought Nickelson's performance was way over the top and took away from the main story, Danny and the Overlook. The mini-series with Steven Weber had better casting and followed the book (King's best, IMOH) much better.
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