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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » To Kill a Mockingbird (9 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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funsway
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I wish that Starrpower's view was correct -- at least that all 7 billion people were intellectuals, and not just in comparison with him.

A few years ago I would have been disturbed by the earlier comments that TKAM wasn't appreciated by school kids because of "dialect."

Now I am just glad they still teach reading in schools at all. Maybe this new book will have pictures.

I will write off Starrpower's comments as a poor attempt at humor and go find a book. Little indication of "intellectual" on TV for sure.

Turn on the radio and hear Taylor Swift. Now that is intellectual! Think I will just go back to bed. Mental indigestion.
"the more one pretends at magic, the more awe and wonder will be found in real life." Arnold Furst

eBooks at https://www.lybrary.com/ken-muller-m-579928.html questions at ken@eversway.com
mastermindreader
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On Jul 11, 2015, balducci wrote:
Talk about a thin shell!


I think he totally missed the joke.
Ray Tupper.
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It went ova his head.
What do we want?
A cure for tourettes!
When do we want it?
C*nt!
Kabbalah
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Some real yolksters here.
"Long may magicians fascinate and continue to be fascinated by the mystery potential in a pack of cards."
~Cliff Green

"The greatest tricks ever performed are not done at all. The audience simply think they see them."
~ John Northern Hilliard
Destiny
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I read it years ago, and not being American, for me it was just a story, and I enjoyed it immensely.

I can see with hindsight, and only because I read it somewhere - I didn't think of it myself, why whites like it more than blacks, but I still think it's a great read.
mastermindreader
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On Jul 12, 2015, Ray Tupper. wrote:
It went ova his head.


I wonder if he thinks the Chrome Dome is a football stadium? Smile
The Hermit
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A recent poll voted it the best novel of all time. But, then again, they voted Da Vinci Code as #5.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2138827/......ime.html
S2000magician
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Quote:
On Jul 12, 2015, mastermindreader wrote:
Quote:
On Jul 12, 2015, Ray Tupper. wrote:
It went ova his head.

I wonder if he thinks the Chrome Dome is a football stadium? Smile

It a cathedral, isn't it?
mastermindreader
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On Jul 12, 2015, The Hermit wrote:
A recent poll voted it the best novel of all time. But, then again, they voted Da Vinci Code as #5.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2138827/......ime.html


It's really not unusual to see books like the Da Vinci Code on lists like that. It won't be on them after another decade. The ones that stand out to me are books that have stood the test of time. The fact that Mockingbird was released fifty-five years ago and is still polling at number one is a good example.
funsway
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If an idea is repeatedly confirmed by eggheads over time,
is the result a mental omelet or a soulful souffle'?
"the more one pretends at magic, the more awe and wonder will be found in real life." Arnold Furst

eBooks at https://www.lybrary.com/ken-muller-m-579928.html questions at ken@eversway.com
Randwill
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Dialect? Some of my favorite reading is the old Pogo strips by Walt Kelly. I have several collections. His use of southern dialects (and different typefaces, all hand lettered) to define his characters is just part of what makes this classic strip so wonderful.
ed rhodes
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On Feb 3, 2015, mastermindreader wrote:
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On Feb 3, 2015, ZachDavenport wrote:
I can't say I'm to excited.


I can, given that "To Kill a Mockingbird" remains one of the greatest American novels ever written.


My kid, who reads quite a bit, was unable to get past the "dialect" writing.
"There's no time to lose," I heard her say.
"Catch your dreams before they slip away."
"Dying all the time, lose your dreams and you could lose your mind.
Ain't life unkind?"
mastermindreader
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Respectfully, Ed, what does that have to do with the fact that the book is considered by many to be the greatest American novel ever written?

Some people can't get through "Huckleberry Finn" for the same reason, but that doesn't diminish its importance in American literature.
The Hermit
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On Jul 13, 2015, ed rhodes wrote:
Quote:
On Feb 3, 2015, mastermindreader wrote:
Quote:
On Feb 3, 2015, ZachDavenport wrote:
I can't say I'm to excited.


I can, given that "To Kill a Mockingbird" remains one of the greatest American novels ever written.


My kid, who reads quite a bit, was unable to get past the "dialect" writing.


Wait till he has to read Beowulf
ed rhodes
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On Jul 13, 2015, mastermindreader wrote:
Respectfully, Ed, what does that have to do with the fact that the book is considered by many to be the greatest American novel ever written?

Some people can't get through "Huckleberry Finn" for the same reason, but that doesn't diminish its importance in American literature.


Oh, I didn't mean to imply the novel was bad. It certainly is a great novel... for some people, it's a great novel that's very hard to read.

I read "Tom Sawyer" several times, couldn't get past Chapter Two of "Huckleberry Finn."
"There's no time to lose," I heard her say.
"Catch your dreams before they slip away."
"Dying all the time, lose your dreams and you could lose your mind.
Ain't life unkind?"
funsway
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My early morning thought is, "Why is 'hard to read' a reason not to continue?" Not being judgmental, just musing on why some students today refuse to do assignments.

Yes, an adult might just want an hour of quiet, semi-mindless diversion. That is why Condensed Books are so popular. You might start a book and not continue because --
the print is too small, the hero is offensive, the grammar is terrible, or it contains dialect. etc.

But, the process of learning/instruction requires assignments that are difficult. Books are not assigned reading because they are "popular."

Consider that TKAM is assigned because it forces the student to deal with dialect, consider racial issues for the viewpoint of a six year old, and experience life back in the Depression years --
maybe even to question, "Why this book popular," or "Wouldn't Atticus be arrested for child abuse today of he let his kid play in a neighbor's yard or walk home from school alone?"

Regardless, no student has the right to say, "i won't finish this assignment because it is hard to do." No multiple choice questions about the book either. Write some original thoughts.

oops, strike the above comments. I forgot that schooling today isn't about getting educated, it is about passing a test and getting a Certificate.

Well, back to wading though Text Messages. Tough work with so much dialect!
"the more one pretends at magic, the more awe and wonder will be found in real life." Arnold Furst

eBooks at https://www.lybrary.com/ken-muller-m-579928.html questions at ken@eversway.com
landmark
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I forgot that schooling today isn't about getting educated, it is about passing a test and getting a Certificate.

Really, Ken, I get that this is just a magic board, and that we're all just throwing the bull around, and things are different than they once were, but as a teacher I find even casual comments like this kind of unhelpful. It puts forward a one-sided version of education that simply is not true. I'm in public schools many times a week, and I see excellent teaching and learning going on every day. Yes, there's plenty wrong, but there's also plenty right, and I don't think that that message gets out enough.
stoneunhinged
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Just a few musings of my own, in random order:

1. I consider the word "intellectual" to be pejorative. I've never come up with a replacement, though. I myself usually refer to people who are well-educated and good at thinking as "serious", as in, "she's a serious thinker". But this is inadequate, I know.

2. #1 reminds me of a discussion a while back that we had about "sophistry". I think "intellectuals" are sophists.

3. I have said it many times: intelligence is over-rated. I could care less what someone's IQ is. Are they a good person? Are they honest? Do they keep their word? Can they do their job competently? Can I trust them? Do I care about them? Do I want to have a beer with them?

4. Regarding the book: there are two books I have read in my life with a bit of incredulity: To Kill a Mockingbird and the Diary of Anne Frank. Both were written by young women with gigantic gifts. Both seem to reflect a seriousness beyond their years. Both are, to put it simply, quite unbelievable as the products of young people. And yet they are real, and they are astonishing. They reflect talent beyond the norm. They are beautiful pieces of work. They make us think, re-think, re-evaluate ourselves and others and the cultures we live in. They are ART (whatever that is).

5. Regarding "hard to read". The most influential books in my life were hard to read.
landmark
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On Feb 3, 2015, landmark wrote:
Fifty years later. Hope it's not a trilogy?


It may be! The lawyer who found the prequel says there is part of another manuscript with her papers.

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/reply......"e=1
Chessmann
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On Jul 15, 2015, stoneunhinged wrote:

Both were written by young women with gigantic...



I was smiling during the moment when my eyes left the last word on the line to move to the left and pick up the rest of the sentence on the line below Smile
My ex-cat was named "Muffin". "Vomit" would be a better name for her. AKA "The Evil Ball of Fur".
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