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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The spooky, the mysterious...the bizarre! » » Translating to Old English (2 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

niva
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Hi all.

Need some help translating "Name your Poison" in old English.

Thanks all for your help.
Yours,

Ivan
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Chaplain_63
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This is olde saxon spoken in the lands of what we know today as England - south Scotland 10th to 16th century it's called MIDDLE ENGLISH
ágennama úre atres/-) poison venom gall
name 1st person - your 1st person - singular item (choice) hope this helps , I was a language professor at North Arkansas College
Chaplain_63
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Good job there Daekness...your definitions ride in the time that Niva was most likly refering to, the definitions I attained were from
10th to 16th century...the earlier being the time of Druid,first nordic/english practice of witch craft and sorcery known in those lands,
which came from travelers (pagan) from the east and middle east that brought the small alabaster jars and heavy woven materials for trade and open market
Darkness
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Cool Smile

Wouldn't it have been funny if they had slang back in the 10th-16th century? "Check it my man, this libation is off ye hook yo"

It's also known as "Pick, choose or name your Posion"? I wonder which came first? I don't think there is a documented origin.

I did find this below for what it's worth, take it with a gain of ye olde salt Smile

Liquor was called “poison” as a slang around the 19th century. “Nominate your poison” in 1864. “Name your poison” in 1870. “What’s your poison” in 1871. “Choose your poison” has been in print since approx., 1888 and “pick your poison” around 1913. In 1888 “choose your poison” was used to refer to Democrats and Republicans.

Chaplin, you should start a thread on "the time of Druid, first nordic/english practice of witch craft and sorcery known"
veegates
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Along the same lines.... It gets a bit dangerous when dealing with the German word for 'poison' which is 'gift.' So, I am guessing if someone from Germany offers you a 'gift'.... you might want to give it some thought.
PROF BC
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As one who teaches Anglo-Saxon, aka Old English, at university, I would be remiss in not warning you off of the above phrase. Namian is more properly used when bestowing a name upon something or someone (as in 'name your child' after it is born). In the requested phrase, 'name your poison,' I suspect you mean the colloquial usage of 'choose or select' your poison rather than 'give it a title'.

Middle English is technically the language of Chaucer "Whan that April with his showres soote/The daught of March hath perced to the roote"). Old English (Anglo-Saxon) is the pre-1066-invasion language found in Beowulf (ðaem feower bairn hað forð geridden into þa worold gewoken). As such, you want an imperative mood word for 'choose', the genitive second person pronoun, and then the accusative version of a word for poison (Anglo-Saxon being an inflected language, unlike modern English). I would therefore suggest the following:

ácíes þín unlybban (pronounced ahs-EE-yes theen (or 'thine' if you prefer) un-lib-BAHN), which would mean 'select/choose your poison (suggesting a type of poison concocted using witchcraft)'.

Ator could also be used, as offered in the above posting, but ator is the more general word for poison (that could be used for venoms, plant poisons, and at least twice it is used in the literature to suggest suppuration). Unlybban technically means 'non-life' (even as 'antibiotic' means 'against life' in Latin) but its use (3 times attested in the literature) is always in relation to poisons brewed by witchcraft. I would therefore suggest that "ácíes þín unlybban" does the work you want.

BC
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niva
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I was looking for something more recent that can still be understood. Would "Name ye poison" work?

I hope I am making sense.
Yours,

Ivan
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'Ye' is not a genitive construction. 'Name, choose, or select thy poison' would be more appropriate.

BC
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niva
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Oh yes! That's great!
Yours,

Ivan
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Sorry that's why I put a (?) and a generic link to a dictionary to serve yourself.

"ácíes þín unlybban" or "select thy poison"

I know which one I would pick Smile
Darkness
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Sorry that's why I put a (?) and a generic link to a dictionary to serve yourself.

"ácíes þín unlybban" or "select thy poison"

I know which one I would pick Smile
niva
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Thank you all!! Smile
Yours,

Ivan
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