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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workshop » » Help With A Simple...For Most People...Busking Table:-P? (1 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

KenRyan
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I apologize if this has been hashed up and down a gajillion times. I found a lot of ideas for tables and boxes here, but most are more involved/complex than I really need. And yet, I have so little experience in wood working that even the simplest thing is probably a mystery to me. All I want to do is make a simple table top. Here is the back of the one I'm trying to copy (assuming this link works) - Jack's Magician's Table. My friend says it's just "wood trim." But that doesn't help me much. There are a LOT of types.

He says his table is a piece of high quality 3/8" birch plywood. The pad is attached with 3m spray adhesive. The chalkboard (the back side) is a special spray paint on the plywood. The frame is attached by wood screws. When I saw his table last week at a festival, the top (velvet part) just had fairly thin wood all around the velvet, sticking up maybe a quarter of an inch or less above the surface, which would stop a ball rolling off, etc. The top of the wood was rounded.

Has anyone here made a plan for something like this? I understand everything except how to attach the frame/wood trim. It SEEMS to be a sort of corner trim or something. I'm just too ignorant to know.

Any tips here would be helpful. Thanks!

Ken
AGMagic
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The link didn't work for me but what you appear to be describing is usually called molding. Yes there are several types so you can customize your table the way you would like to have it. If you use 3/8" Birch ply for the tabletop and add a foam base under the felt or velvet cover, you will probably want to use 3/4" wide molding which should give you approximately a 3/16" to 1/4" lip.
Attach the wood trim (molding) with escutchen or finishing nails and be sure to use a good wood workers glue between the trim and the plywood also. Once it dries, the glue does most of the work of holding the trim in place. Put a thin coat of glue on the edges of the plywood and let it almost dry before applying a final coat of glue to both the plywood and the trim then assemble and tack in place with the finishing nails. The edge of the plywood is 50% end grain of the wood which soaks up lots of glue. Using the first coat of glue on it helps to seal the end grain and makes the glue job hold better. Some will tell you that this step is not necessary but I have always used it on end grain and have never had a box or project come apart on me.

If you have a mitre box available cut the ends of your molding to 45 degrees to make it look nicer. If not, choose a trim that is fairly square and butt joints (square ends) should be fine.

Good luck!
Tim Silver - http://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-Woodshop/122578214436546

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

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Cliffg37
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I don't have plans for the table you are seeking, but "blackboard spray" can be purchased online or at any home builder store (Lowes, Home depot etc.)

Here is an example,

http://www.stuff4crafts.com/chalkboard-a......od_hgA0g

not too expensive either.
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Both are fun if you do it right!
KenRyan
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Thanks guys. It probably would have helped if I could get the picture. I'll try. My main confusion is the type of moulding and how to attach it. It looks to me like the bottom is sitting on top of part of the moulding, and the screws are going into the back of the table, not the side. So I was thinking the cross-section must have been L-shaped?

Anyway, here are some pics:

Image

Image

Image


Ken
Bill Hegbli
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If you simply go to a Home improvement and just browse the trim section which is usually at the back of the stores, then you will find trim molding. We cannot tell you which kind of material or wood, as trim comes in all types of wood and plastic woods finished and none finished. I can tell you not to get the soft pine. It will mark very easily.

What is trim, it is wood decoration that is usually placed at the joint of walls meeting the ceiling in a house. Talk to the salesman to find a hard wood trim that will not split when nailing or screwing. You will have to drill pilot holes with a hand drill to put the nails though it. I would not suggest gluing anything to the board, as then it is not possible to repair it at all, you will have to start from scratch. Just go buy pre-cut 3/4" plywood, and have the depot cut to your size you want. Then by some screws or nails called Brads for the trim. Buy the trim which comes in 8 and 10 and 12 foot lengths. Then buy a miter box and miter saw to cut the trim. Trim can be the kind that is applied over outside corners, so the back is cut at a 45 degree angle. Just find one that covers the end grain and wraps over the top as you described.

It is impossible to find the correct size and shape sitting on the couch, or in front of computer, you will have to go shop for what you need. Plan for a 2 or 3 hours of looking at what is available.

Tip: Don't take the wife or you will have to remodel your whole house with the latest trends in home decor. LOL Smile
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Bill Hegbli
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From the pictures you just posted that looks like white oak, very difficult to work with, and open grain. They may have a finished trim they sell, although I never seen anything like that, I would say it is 2 pieces of molding, one on the bottom and one the side and top. The bottom looks like ordinary pin wood. The bottom looks more like felt or Formica material then any kind of paint. They have black Formica that has a textured finish. The Formica would differently stop it from warping.

I would say he did not wrap the top material around the board, just cut it square to the edge, then glued on the side molding. You will have to due a lot of arithmetic to get it to all fit properly. Looks like he flubbed as well, with the open miter joints.

Remember measure twice and cut once.

A word of advice, at least chose other colors and trim, just don't copy the guys hard work, he will be insulted that you did.
You seem to think that just because it a flat board it must be simple to make. I will tell you that this is not simple to make, with someone that has no experience with woodcraft, because of the trim work. You need the tools and knowledge to work out the measurements or you will have a piece of junky looking board.
Vietnam Veteran 1967, Sgt. E-5

Graduate of Chavez College of Prestidigitation and Showmanship

"Magic With A Twist Of Comedy"
KenRyan
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Thanks Bill. I appreciate all the advice. Looks like I have more work in front of me than I thought.

I'll post pics when I eventually get it done.

Cheers!

Ken
AGMagic
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From the picture it looks like he used about 1" corner molding. Bill is right about not using pine or fir, they are too soft. If you like the natural whiteish look maple would be a good choice. Search for it at a lumber yard that specializes in hardwoods. You are not likely to find hardwood trim like this at a home improvement center. For mounting, he has simply screwed it on from onto the plywood board from the bottom. Some glue at the corners would help to hold it together and make it look more finished. You might also look at simple picture frame molding.
Tim Silver - http://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-Woodshop/122578214436546

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

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KenRyan
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Thanks AGMagic!

Ken
Bill Hegbli
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I agree that molding around the frame could very well be Picture Fame wood. The finish is just to nice to be hand finished. Go to a picture framing store and take a look at their selection.
Vietnam Veteran 1967, Sgt. E-5

Graduate of Chavez College of Prestidigitation and Showmanship

"Magic With A Twist Of Comedy"
KenRyan
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Thanks Bill.

Ken
KenRyan
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I just finished my table! Not bad for a first effort. Here is a post with some pictures: http://www.kentheriotmagic.com/my-magicians-table-project/.
AGMagic
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Looks great. Good job!
Tim Silver - http://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-Woodshop/122578214436546

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

Visualize Whirled Peas!
KenRyan
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Quote:
On Apr 4, 2015, AGMagic wrote:
Looks great. Good job!


Thanks Tim!
AGMagic
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For future reference, always cut mitre joints longer than you think they should be. Then sneak up on the final dimension a bit at a time. This is way easier with a table saw than a mitre box but it can be done. When the amount to be removed gets too small for the saw use sandpaper or a plane to finish it off. This also allows you to adjust for any corners that are not dead on at 90 degrees.
Tim Silver - http://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-Woodshop/122578214436546

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

Visualize Whirled Peas!
KenRyan
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Thanks for that tip, cuz yeah - that was the main problem I had. I can always replace the trim since it's only screwed on.

Cheers!

Ken
Bill Hegbli
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Additional information, for general knowledge in cutting wood:
There is no problem with cutting miter angles with bench saw. It is very easy. Remember, I said to measure twice and cut once. It takes patience, you have to cut on the outside of the line. The line should be accurately measured. Always check your saw blade at the from and back, that is set correctly.

A 45 degree angle is the length of the thickness of the wood being used.

A miter box is more difficult only because the saw teeth can spit the wood on the beginning and ending cuts. Use a saw with fine teeth, and cut slowly, put no pressure on the saw, let the saw do all the cutting. Again, cut on the outside of the measurement line, not on it. In other words allow for the saw blade Kerf.

--------------------------------------------------------------

I have found sanding is the most difficult to do by hand, if you have a electric bench circular saw is the only way to get a perfect flat angle. Just to expensive to sand a trip piece.

Ken, what molding did you find, was it picture frame molding or home molding? You did nice job.
Vietnam Veteran 1967, Sgt. E-5

Graduate of Chavez College of Prestidigitation and Showmanship

"Magic With A Twist Of Comedy"
KenRyan
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Thanks Bill. That was not picture frame stuff. It's from Lowes and I think the type was called "outside corner moulding." I remembered what you said when I was cutting, so I made the first cut just backward to make the groove. Then I switched to a hack saw. That took a lot longer but made a much smoother cut. Thanks for the tip!

Ken
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