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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » Parents of Child Killed in Boston Marathon Bombing Don’t Want Tsarnaev to Face the Death Penalty (5 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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landmark
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Although I am opposed to the death penalty, I don't think I could ever feel as these parents do, were I in their position. They have my admiration.

"The Boston Globe has published a heartbreaking appeal from the parents of Martin Richard, the 8-year-old boy who died in the Boston Marathon bombing. Bill and Denise Richard (who were also injured in the blast, along with their two surviving children) are asking prosecutors to stop seeking the death penalty for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who was recently found guilty of carrying out the attacks with his late brother, Tamerlan. Rather than seeing Tsarnaev killed — and enduring the years of legal maneuvering that generally precede an execution in the United States — the Richards want the 21-year-old sentenced to life in prison "without any possibility of release and waiving all of his rights to appeal."

'We understand all too well the heinousness and brutality of the crimes committed. We were there. We lived it. The defendant murdered our 8-year-old son, maimed our 7-year-old daughter, and stole part of our soul. We know that the government has its reasons for seeking the death penalty, but the continued pursuit of that punishment could bring years of appeals and prolong reliving the most painful day of our lives. We hope our two remaining children do not have to grow up with the lingering, painful reminder of what the defendant took from them, which years of appeals would undoubtedly bring.'

For us, the story of Marathon Monday 2013 should not be defined by the actions or beliefs of the defendant, but by the resiliency of the human spirit and the rallying cries of this great city. We can never replace what was taken from us, but we can continue to get up every morning and fight another day. As long as the defendant is in the spotlight, we have no choice but to live a story told on his terms, not ours. The minute the defendant fades from our newspapers and TV screens is the minute we begin the process of rebuilding our lives and our family.' "

http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/201......cks=true
Destiny
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On Apr 19, 2015, landmark wrote:
Although I am opposed to the death penalty, I don't think I could ever feel as these parents do, were I in their position. They have my admiration.

"The Boston Globe has published a heartbreaking appeal from the parents of Martin Richard, the 8-year-old boy who died in the Boston Marathon bombing. Bill and Denise Richard (who were also injured in the blast, along with their two surviving children) are asking prosecutors to stop seeking the death penalty for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who was recently found guilty of carrying out the attacks with his late brother, Tamerlan. Rather than seeing Tsarnaev killed — and enduring the years of legal maneuvering that generally precede an execution in the United States — the Richards want the 21-year-old sentenced to life in prison "without any possibility of release and waiving all of his rights to appeal."

'We understand all too well the heinousness and brutality of the crimes committed. We were there. We lived it. The defendant murdered our 8-year-old son, maimed our 7-year-old daughter, and stole part of our soul. We know that the government has its reasons for seeking the death penalty, but the continued pursuit of that punishment could bring years of appeals and prolong reliving the most painful day of our lives. We hope our two remaining children do not have to grow up with the lingering, painful reminder of what the defendant took from them, which years of appeals would undoubtedly bring.'

For us, the story of Marathon Monday 2013 should not be defined by the actions or beliefs of the defendant, but by the resiliency of the human spirit and the rallying cries of this great city. We can never replace what was taken from us, but we can continue to get up every morning and fight another day. As long as the defendant is in the spotlight, we have no choice but to live a story told on his terms, not ours. The minute the defendant fades from our newspapers and TV screens is the minute we begin the process of rebuilding our lives and our family.' "

http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/201......cks=true



It's heartbreaking. I don't believe in the death penalty either, but sometimes it's a struggle, and this guy compounds his guilt with his inability to take responsibility for his own actions. I will say that while I don't believe in the death penalty I do think they go to rather extreme lengths to ensure these people don't kill themselves. I'd be a bit lazier.
Chessmann
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Interesting perspective on the (possibly long) process from the parents.
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I cannot imagine how one must feel when a loved on is murdered, but I am not opposed to the death penalty on the grounds that it is inhumane, extreme, immoral, etc. Additionally, I don't think it completely matters what the victim thinks, as one of the purposes of sentencing is punishment of behalf of society (as well as deterrence and rehabilitation. Obviously, death does not rehabilitate, but it does prevent habitual offenders). The only factor that concerns me is that it might possibly be applied to someone who was wrongly convicted.
Destiny
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On Apr 19, 2015, Starrpower wrote:
I cannot imagine how one must feel when a loved on is murdered, but I am not opposed to the death penalty on the grounds that it is inhumane, extreme, immoral, etc. Additionally, I don't think it completely matters what the victim thinks, as one of the purposes of sentencing is punishment of behalf of society (as well as deterrence and rehabilitation. Obviously, death does not rehabilitate, but it does prevent habitual offenders). The only factor that concerns me is that it might possibly be applied to someone who was wrongly convicted.


Good point - I wonder about the value of victim impact statements - if it helps the victim - good but I don't see the value regarding sentencing - one doesn't need to be a victim to understand a crime is abhorrent. And there's the terrible system of blood money insome countries where criminals can avoid other punishment by paying the victims family for their loss.
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What's the point of keeping him alive in jail, where he can spend his days converting other prisoners and persuading them to become jihadists?
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tommy
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Death or a life time in prison, the way I see it is, what’s the difference?
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

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On Apr 20, 2015, tommy wrote:
Death or a life time in prison, the way I see it is, what’s the difference?


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Looks like you have been on the oxytocin pills again.
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On Apr 20, 2015, tommy wrote:
Death or a life time in prison, the way I see it is, what’s the difference?


I quite like Chessmann's thought - and there could be a great deal of difference for the relatives and victims. That said, I would be strongly in favor of death but for the endless morass we have made of the process...
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On Apr 19, 2015, Starrpower wrote:
I cannot imagine how one must feel when a loved on is murdered, but I am not opposed to the death penalty on the grounds that it is inhumane, extreme, immoral, etc. Additionally, I don't think it completely matters what the victim thinks, as one of the purposes of sentencing is punishment of behalf of society (as well as deterrence and rehabilitation. Obviously, death does not rehabilitate, but it does prevent habitual offenders). The only factor that concerns me is that it might possibly be applied to someone who was wrongly convicted.

Wrongly convicted people getting the death penalty is a major issue in the US. According to research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences one in 25 of those on death row are completely innocent, and the USA has executed more than 100 innocent people since the resumption of executions in 1977.

Also, the Supreme Court has ruled (Herrera V Collins) that proving one is innocent is not grounds to halt an execution. That is the most compelling reason to oppose the death penalty.
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Death penalty, life in prison, very long in prison. They are all inadequate responses to heinous crimes.

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The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
rockwall
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On Apr 20, 2015, TonyB2009 wrote:
...
Also, the Supreme Court has ruled (Herrera V Collins) that proving one is innocent is not grounds to halt an execution. That is the most compelling reason to oppose the death penalty.


Quite a simplistic overview of the actual Supreme Court ruling. The actual ruling creates a much less compelling reason to oppose the death penalty.
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It is pretty amazing that he is still alive. I think he was brainwashed and bulldozed into it but apart from that I can’t think why they wouldn't pass the death penalty. He could kill himself anyway.
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Quote:
On Apr 20, 2015, TonyB2009 wrote:
Quote:
On Apr 19, 2015, Starrpower wrote:
I cannot imagine how one must feel when a loved on is murdered, but I am not opposed to the death penalty on the grounds that it is inhumane, extreme, immoral, etc. Additionally, I don't think it completely matters what the victim thinks, as one of the purposes of sentencing is punishment of behalf of society (as well as deterrence and rehabilitation. Obviously, death does not rehabilitate, but it does prevent habitual offenders). The only factor that concerns me is that it might possibly be applied to someone who was wrongly convicted.

Wrongly convicted people getting the death penalty is a major issue in the US. According to research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences one in 25 of those on death row are completely innocent, and the USA has executed more than 100 innocent people since the resumption of executions in 1977.

Also, the Supreme Court has ruled (Herrera V Collins) that proving one is innocent is not grounds to halt an execution. That is the most compelling reason to oppose the death penalty.


The authors of the very study you cite (which makes a number of assumptions, many of them questionable, and in no way provides a basis for any sort of firm conclusions) doesn't think the number of exectued defendants exceeds 50, let alone 100.


"The most charged question in this area is different: How many innocent defendants have been put to death (6)? We cannot estimate that number directly but we believe it is comparatively low. If the rate were the same as our estimate for false death sentences, the number of innocents executed in the United States in the past 35 y would be more than 50 (20). We do not believe that has happened"
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Guess they forgot to tell Bill Buckley.

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How many executions of innocent defendants is acceptable?
LobowolfXXX
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Good question. A related question is "What's an acceptable number of innocent defendants in prison for the rest of their lives?"
"Torture doesn't work" lol
Guess they forgot to tell Bill Buckley.

"...as we reason and love, we are able to hope. And hope enables us to resist those things that would enslave us."
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On Apr 20, 2015, mastermindreader wrote:
How many executions of innocent defendants is acceptable?


Zero.
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On Apr 20, 2015, NYCTwister wrote:
Quote:
On Apr 20, 2015, mastermindreader wrote:
How many executions of innocent defendants is acceptable?


Zero.


Which, if true, still doesn't give one license to make up an unsupported high number.
"Torture doesn't work" lol
Guess they forgot to tell Bill Buckley.

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On Apr 19, 2015, arthur stead wrote:

What's the point of keeping him alive in jail, where he can spend his days converting other prisoners and persuading them to become jihadists?



That will be a little tough for him to do as he will be in solitary confinement for the rest of his life where he will have no contact with any of the prison population.
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