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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » Classic English literature? (5 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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LobowolfXXX
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Speaking of Raymond C's...Carver.
"Torture doesn't work" lol
Guess they forgot to tell Bill Buckley.

"...as we reason and love, we are able to hope. And hope enables us to resist those things that would enslave us."
ed rhodes
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Quote:
On May 4, 2015, MorrisCH wrote:
Wow, What a comprehensive list, Thank you very much Theodore
I love the works by Charles Dickens and Jane Austen, I enjoyed reading their books in translated version, but time to read them in English Smile
This list will surely keeps me busy for awhile

ClintonMagus:
Opps, I I guess I am after literature in English, I didn't know there was different between two.


"English literature" would be classic books FROM England; Dickens, Austen, etc.
"Literature in English" would include people from America like Twain, Jack London, H.P. Lovecraft if you want to get creepy.
"There's no time to lose," I heard her say.
"Catch your dreams before they slip away."
"Dying all the time, lose your dreams and you could lose your mind.
Ain't life unkind?"
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What happens when scientists working for me gain control of your food supply?

Read my book.
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Magnus Eisengrim
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Come to think of it, Charlotte's Web by EB White would be a great choice. Gorgeous prose.
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
ringmaster
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Literature in English would include the vast grouping of American Lit. You can get a great sampling of contemporary English and American buy reading a few issues of "The New Yorker" or even American "Playboy". These give a sampling of of the best in modern Fiction and critical writing, and they will inform and intertain you at the same time.
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TonyB2009
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Another American whom I love, and who writes with beautiful simplicity, is Jay McInerney. I have just finished rereading Bright Lights Big City, and I can highly recommend that.
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-Fahrenheit 451

-The Outsiders

-Shane
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motown
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Elmore Leonard
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arthur stead
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Here's a very useful tip for you guys. Go to www.thriftbooks.com

In the search area, type in "classics." You'll find page after page of classic books for only 3 or 4 bucks each. They're used, but in my experience most are in good condition.
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gypsyfish
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Hemingway's short stories are mostly great - especially the Nick Adams stories and I loved For Whom the Bell Toils.

Chandler and Leonard are wonderful and I'd throw in Hammett.

And I think Pat Conroy writes transcendently.
0pus
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I love Mark Twain, and I think that he has written the great American novel and it is "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn."

That said, Twain can be darn hard to read. I remember as a child trying to struggle through the dialogs written in dialect. They might as well have been written in a different language. It wasn't until my mother explained to me what he was trying to do, and even then I had my difficulties. It wasn't until I finally started reading those passages out loud while listening to the sounds of my own voice that I finally "got it."

That said, I would recommend Steinbeck as a good author to read for his straightforward, non-intrusive prose. I also enjoy the poetic quality of Henry James's writing, but I find his plots unexciting.
ringmaster
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Quote:
On May 6, 2015, arthur stead wrote:
Here's a very useful tip for you guys. Go to www.thriftbooks.com

In the search area, type in "classics." You'll find page after page of classic books for only 3 or 4 bucks each. They're used, but in my experience most are in good condition.

here is another
www.gutenberg.org
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tommy
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There are audio books, which one might listen to while playing poker and so on.
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imgic
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I'd suggest short stories. They might be a bit easier to digest, and, depending on what you get, might be more current on language and slang.

I just finished 2014 Best Short Story Mystery compilation. Also, I've always enjoyed Stephen King's short stories/novellas more than his full length works.
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arthur stead
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Ray Bradbury's Golden Apples of the Sun has some great short stories, too.
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ed rhodes
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Ray is of course a genius. Speaking of Stephen, I just finished "Doctor Sleep" which is a sequel to "The Shining." You honestly don't have to have read "The Shining" to follow "Doctor Sleep," all the significant points are brought up in the story.
"There's no time to lose," I heard her say.
"Catch your dreams before they slip away."
"Dying all the time, lose your dreams and you could lose your mind.
Ain't life unkind?"
stoneunhinged
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Quote:
On May 6, 2015, 0pus wrote:

That said, Twain can be darn hard to read. I remember as a child trying to struggle through the dialogs written in dialect. They might as well have been written in a different language.


That's a good point. I wouldn't recommend Huckleberry Finn to children or non-native speakers. But Tom Sawyer is a different story. (Ha!)

I think his travel writings are some of the funniest books ever written by anyone in any language. Innocents Abroad is both brilliant and funny, and the English is more accessible than in Huck Finn.
Magnus Eisengrim
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Quote:
On May 10, 2015, stoneunhinged wrote:
Quote:
On May 6, 2015, 0pus wrote:

That said, Twain can be darn hard to read. I remember as a child trying to struggle through the dialogs written in dialect. They might as well have been written in a different language.


That's a good point. I wouldn't recommend Huckleberry Finn to children or non-native speakers. But Tom Sawyer is a different story. (Ha!)

I think his travel writings are some of the funniest books ever written by anyone in any language. Innocents Abroad is both brilliant and funny, and the English is more accessible than in Huck Finn.


Reminds me of the first time I read any of Robert Burns's prose. I was shocked to discover that it was English!
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
balducci
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On May 4, 2015, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:

Hmm. I'm trying to think of examples that are noteworthy as literature, but are direct in their use of English. Many authors play with the language, which is wonderful, but probably not what you need right now.

Joseph Conrad--Heart of Darkness
Vladimir Nabokov--Lolita

You think Nabokov is direct and does not play with the English language in Lolita? I don't know about that, I read it a few months ago for the first time and I think I would have missed so much had I not read an annotated version. To quote wikipedia (!) "It exhibits the love of intricate word play and synesthetic detail that characterised all his works." Not to mention the popular culture references and slang of the day he uses.
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Magnus Eisengrim
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Quote:
On May 10, 2015, balducci wrote:
Quote:
On May 4, 2015, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:

Hmm. I'm trying to think of examples that are noteworthy as literature, but are direct in their use of English. Many authors play with the language, which is wonderful, but probably not what you need right now.

Joseph Conrad--Heart of Darkness
Vladimir Nabokov--Lolita

You think Nabokov is direct and does not play with the English language in Lolita? I don't know about that, I read it a few months ago for the first time and I think I would have missed so much had I not read an annotated version. To quote wikipedia (!) "It exhibits the love of intricate word play and synesthetic detail that characterised all his works." Not to mention the popular culture references and slang of the day he uses.


Good excuse to reread it Smile

Perhaps I was projecting from memory.
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
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