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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » Classic English literature? (5 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Lewis Marks
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When I was very young I remember an enormous bookcase at my grandparents. I learned later it included the Harvard Classics, which was considered one of the most important collections a family could have. Expensive too I'll guess. I was about eight years old when my widowed mother bought my sister and me the Harvard Classics Shelf of Fiction and, a few years later, another collection of paperbacks. There were at least a dozen but I can only remember now that it had Black Beauty and Treasure Island.

I don't know what happened to them, lost forever I suppose. But I recently found the Harvard Classics complete online, and for free. Of course the others are always available too.

My grandfather had very early (first, maybe) editions of Mark Twain's Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, which were his father's. I still have the Tom Sawyer and my sister has the Huckleberry Finn. My grandchildren love to have Grandpa read stories to them.
MorrisCH
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Thanks for all the comments here, I didn't expect to get that much response out of this sort of question.

Currently I am reading 1984, I highly doubt that this is the type of book people consider as classic literature (maybe I am wrong), but so far is a fun read

I will take all comment into consideration
at the mean time, keep the idea coming Smile

BTW, member ClintonMagus here has asked me earlier whether I am looking for English literature or literature in English
with the clarification from member Ed Rhodes, I guess I am leaning toward "Classic Literature" such as Dickens and Austen
but no harm reading other works from other authors Smile
stoneunhinged
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I'm not really sure if it fits this thread, but my absolute, no one-even-comes-close favorite writer of English prose is Norman Maclean.

But for the OP: anything you read is good. It's all good. Mastering a foreign language isn't all that important. Enjoying your reading is.
LobowolfXXX
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Quote:
On May 11, 2015, stoneunhinged wrote:
I'm not really sure if it fits this thread, but my absolute, no one-even-comes-close favorite writer of English prose is Norman Maclean.

But for the OP: anything you read is good. It's all good. Mastering a foreign language isn't all that important. Enjoying your reading is.



If you like Maclean, I can't recommend Norman Sage's short stories highly enough. I first came across his writing in the Iowa Review (which should be enough of an endorsement by itself). I looked him up after reading them, and I spoke with him by telephone for quite a while. Nice guy. Great weiter.

http://www.amazon.com/Waiting-Fireworks-......70030642
"Torture doesn't work" lol
Guess they forgot to tell Bill Buckley.

"...as we reason and love, we are able to hope. And hope enables us to resist those things that would enslave us."
Gregor Von G.
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MR James: Ghost Story Of An Antiquary is a masterpiece

J.G. Ballard - I love almost everything

Not English but American:
Philip Dick - One of my favourite at all, master of science fiction.
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » Classic English literature? (5 Likes)
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