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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » A magician must be a gentleman so... (2 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Gregor Von G.
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Interesting web magazine:
http://www.gentlemansgazette.com/
Explore it, a lot of good articles
mastermindreader
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I'm sure all of the female magicians here are thrilled with the title of this thread. Smile
Gregor Von G.
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..mmmmh....English is not my language, so maybe I got something wrong...i mean a gentleman in sense of a polite and classy man...not a "man"...
Gregor Von G.
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In Italy "gentleman" means an "old styled man"
mastermindreader
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Oh. That's better. Smile

Good articles, though. Thanks for the link.
Gregor Von G.
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Sometimes my english is not really clear but...no, nothing sexist here!!! Sexism is something so far from me that I can not even imagine how a person can think that way
Magnus Eisengrim
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Quote:
On May 29, 2015, Gregor Von G. wrote:
Sometimes my english is not really clear but...no, nothing sexist here!!! Sexism is something so far from me that I can not even imagine how a person can think that way


Is there an Italian expression for a well-mannered person? Or do you have different expressions for men and women?

In everyday English, we would say gentleman for a man and lady for a woman, implying that they are well-mannered. The construction "well-mannered person" is awkward and sounds modern and forced. But, in my opinion, it's the way forward.
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
magicfish
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There is nothing wrong with Gentleman nor Lady.
Gregor Von G.
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In italian we say "Gentiluomo" for a very well mannered person - Male and "Gentildonna" for a very well mannered person Female but, although some people continue to use the term, including me, it is considered obsolete. Another form is "Signore" for a Well mannered usually wealthy and aged man and "Signora" for female. A curiosity - "Signore" is used for define "Lord" in sense of "God"..in the bible the Lord is called "Signore".
Gregor Von G.
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In current language Uomo means Men and Donna means Female, in a neutral way.
Magnus Eisengrim
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"Uomo" -- fascinating word. Do you know its history?
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
Gregor Von G.
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Is from the latin word "Homo" which is a word related to "Humus" which means "earth", the sense is "men of the earth"
In Italy we also use the ancient greek word "Andros", similar means to Latin "Homo" in words such as "Androgino" "Antropomorfo" etc...(Andro... or Antro...it depends on the complete word)
Magnus Eisengrim
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Interesting. But since "homo" is a masculine word, where does the U come from, and how does it make the word gender neutral?
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
Gregor Von G.
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Neutral in the sense that it does not refer to "good" man, "bad" man or "well mannered". Only defines the gender
The word uomo, as for all modern Italian words, comes from the Italian vulgar language "Italiano Volgare", which not means "Rude" but "dal Volgo" - "from People" With the fall of the Holy Roman Empire, Latin remained the language of high culture and the people spoke a dialect that mixed Latin and languages of the conquerors, the Volgare. Every region have his own dialect, the first book ever printed in Itlian language - volgare - is the Divine Comedy ...
Gregor Von G.
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So, there is no means in letter U at the start of uomo, just the literal transcription of a spoken word
Magnus Eisengrim
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Oh I see. Thanks.
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
arthur stead
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Interesting discussion, Gregor and Magnus. There is a fascinating book you guys might like: "The Professor and the Madman" by Simon Winchester. The sub-title is "A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of The Oxford English Dictionary." You can get a used copy from Thriftbooks.com for $3.59. Or Abebooks.co.uk has one for about $3.24.
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Magnus Eisengrim
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Quote:
On May 29, 2015, arthur stead wrote:
Interesting discussion, Gregor and Magnus. There is a fascinating book you guys might like: "The Professor and the Madman" by Simon Winchester. The sub-title is "A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of The Oxford English Dictionary." You can get a used copy from Thriftbooks.com for $3.59. Or Abebooks.co.uk has one for about $3.24.


Interesting. I've read Winchester's "The Meaning of Everything: The Story of the Oxford English Dictionary" and very much enjoyed it. I wasn't aware that he wrote a second book on the topic. I'll have to check that out.

Thanks Arthur.
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
ed rhodes
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Quote:
On May 29, 2015, mastermindreader wrote:
I'm sure all of the female magicians here are thrilled with the title of this thread. Smile


I was just thinking that...
Smile
"There's no time to lose," I heard her say.
"Catch your dreams before they slip away."
"Dying all the time, lose your dreams and you could lose your mind.
Ain't life unkind?"
stoneunhinged
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German doesn't have a word for gentleman.
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