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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workshop » » Anyone make there own hot rod? (5 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

terryisaacs
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Hey everybody, I love the trick hot rod and always wanted to make my own. I'm not very handy though and don't have many tools. I would like to make it out of wood. I've tried going to some arts and crafts stores but couldn't find anything that I thought would work for it. I'm wanting something that would look nice, so even though I understand I could just use a popsicle stick I'm wanting something closer to a manufactured hot rod and preferably under $15 to make. Do any of you make your own? Any helpful insight is appreciated. Smile Smile
"What we do in life echoes in eternity"
Michael Baker
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Eternal Order
Near a river in the Midwest
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I make them and sell them. They are made of Walnut. They are $15. + shipping. By the time you'd buy the wood, the wood finish, the jewels, and the tools, you could never make one as nice for so little.

http://themagiccompany.com/cat_main.html

Scroll down and you'll find them.
~michael baker
The Magic Company
jimgerrish
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East Orange, NJ
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There is a certain satisfaction in knowing you can make your own props. All the old-time magicians sat in their kitchens or workshops between shows and enjoyed working with their hands to make magic to puzzle the brains of their audiences. The scenes in the Illusionist movie give me that feeling of nostalgia for following in the footsteps of Germain, Houdin, De Kolta and others. It's not always about the money. Anyway, if you need a little guidance, you'll find it in The Wizards' Journal #9, with Spellbinder's "Magic Rune Sticks" which includes, besides making the obvious Rune Sticks, making a set of Jumping Gems that ties into the rune effect. If you can make Jumping Gems, you can make Hot Rods. No power tools are needed. Sources are given. Make some heirlooms you will be proud to pass along to the next generation.
terryisaacs
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Michael Baker, your set looks great! I especially like the combo set of the rods you provide. I am hoping to make a number of them in which case cost should be helped that way. Also, like jimgerrish said I like the idea of making it myself. If I was going to buy a set though, yours look great!

jimgerrish, thanks for the advice. I will check it out and probably get it. I do love the idea of creating something myself, thanks.
"What we do in life echoes in eternity"
Michael Baker
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I'm certainly not going to to stand in the way of a magician wanting to make their own props. It can be satisfying, and it's always educational.
~michael baker
The Magic Company
terryisaacs
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Michael Baker, I definitely appreciated your post. I can't imagine that mine will look that good for quite some time if they ever end up looking that good. I'm hoping after some trial and error to have something I'm proud of.
"What we do in life echoes in eternity"
Michael Baker
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The work is really not that hard, and you'll do fine. I was simply concerned with you staying within budget. I know what the materials cost, even being able to buy in bulk. Your later post indicated that you plan to make several. That will help spread out the cost.

FYI - You can of course, just glue the jewels to the surface, but that makes them very prone to breaking off. If you can drill holes and embed the jewels, they will stay put. Also, use a flexible adhesive like Stick N Seal Extreme. Hard glues (like super glue) will break more easily if you drop the prop. Also CA glues (super glue) will eat through the silver backing and make the jewels cloudy.

If you are planning to use something other than jewels, just think about these things as applied to your project.

If you have a Woodcraft near you, you can buy a variety of beautiful dimensional domestic and exotic hardwoods. This will already be planed to the thickness you want (1/4" is a good starting point), and all you'll need to do is cut the width and length. If you don't have one near you, you can order online from them or from Rockler.

http://www.woodcraft.com/category/SU114-......s=1/4%22

http://www.rockler.com/wood
~michael baker
The Magic Company
terryisaacs
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Michael Baker, thank you! I will definitely check out those links.
"What we do in life echoes in eternity"
terryisaacs
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Michael Baker, wow just checked out those links. They will be super helpful, thank you again!
"What we do in life echoes in eternity"
Peter McMillan
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St. George, Utah
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As Michael shows, using the best quality materials will always pay off in the end product.

As a give away to in the Healing Thru Magic, in conjunction with Kevin and Cindy Spencer's Healing of Magic, I use popcicle sticks. I bring this up as a possible way for Terry to start out.
Spiritus Dictum Artifacts ~ Tools of the Craft for Serious Workers http://petemcmillan.wixsite.com/sd-artifacts/artifacts
jimgerrish
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The other reason for embedding the jewels down into the wood is to keep them from being seen on the side angles. I used to be able to do this with a counter-sink drill bit, but the jewels are no longer made with pointy ends, so now I use a small "forstner" drill bit instead. You can even spin these bits between your fingers rather than use a power drill. Takes longer, but you have better control.
Michael Baker
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Forstner bits have many great uses, but the type of bit you use here will depend on the size of the jewels. Twist bits come in a wider range of sizes than forstner bits and allow you better control over the fit. The fact that a twist bit makes a cone-shaped hole is irrelevant, even with a flat bottom jewel, because the jewel will sit at the top (widest point) of the cone. The space below is filled with the flexible adhesive I mentioned earlier.

Jewels are typically sold in MM sizes and the accuracy is not nearly as precise as the sizes of steel bits. You can buy forstner bits in MM sizes, as well, but finding exact sizes, especially small sizes, is problematic. Because standard sizes graduate in smaller increments and are readily available in about any hardware store, it is easier (and cheaper) to find the perfect fit.

Of course you might get lucky. As example, if you find 6mm jewels, they should fit in a 1/4" hole. If they are 7mm, they won't.

Drilling precision is best done with a drill press with a depth gauge, and a jig to accurately line-up the rod for each hole. But the tools available in one's shop dictate this.
~michael baker
The Magic Company
AGMagic
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Terry,I too have made these and I can tell you that Michael has given you great advice, especially the last line of the post just above. These are nearly impossible to drill accurately without a jig, drill press, and a depth stop. Trust me, I have tried. Also, If you search for point back rhinestones on the web, you will find that they are still available. My preference is Swarovski but they are pricey.
Tim Silver - http://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-Woodshop/122578214436546

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

Visualize Whirled Peas!
Michael Baker
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Check out Tim's FB page if you want to see some gorgeous stuff. Nothing less than 1st rate!

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-Woo......s_stream
~michael baker
The Magic Company
terryisaacs
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Wow, thanks everybody for the advice! I still need to get everything but when I actually finish one I will try and upload a picture. Everyone has been really helpful. Smile
"What we do in life echoes in eternity"
Michael Baker
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Great! We love to look at other people's projects. "Yup."

Image
~michael baker
The Magic Company
Daniel A. Day II
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Apache Junction, AZ
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The sets that are shown here are beautiful.

I tried making a set. I had some of the jewels and some metal rods in my garage from another project.

I learned that the rod needs to be square for ease of use. Too thin and it is hard to make magic.

I am planning on making more since I learned my lesson once the maintenance projects around the house are done.

Daniel
welwell
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I built these 20 years ago. They are 3/8" acrylic and Swarovski crystals.

Click here to view attached image.
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