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magicalaurie
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I find this interesting. I think it's fun to see if someone can hit a character and Michael Shannon seems to be hitting Elvis to some degree here. Smile This film will play as the centrepiece at Tribeca film festival. http://www.ottawacitizen.com/entertainme......ory.html






I found this video, which I'm sure will lend some insight, though I haven't had a chance to view it yet:

ed rhodes
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I'm fascinated by how often Elvis has been showing up in movies. This one, at least, is based on a real event.

I know there's one where a kid kidnaps Elvis so the singer can visit the kid's sick mother.

There's another one which doesn't really have Elvis, but a man who believes he's Elvis and gets involved with a kid who has a secret and a Cadillac with a ripped off driver's door.
"There's no time to lose," I heard her say.
"Catch your dreams before they slip away."
"Dying all the time, lose your dreams and you could lose your mind.
Ain't life unkind?"
magicalaurie
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Thanks, ed. Smile

I think the video above is definitely worth a watch. I enjoyed it, anyway. Smile Some points I found to be highlights:

Senator Murphy, American Airlines Stationary, the letter

"...it was kind of a Dracula look"

"The King is here"
arthur stead
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Another bit of Elvis trivia told to me by John Phillips:

John and Elvis were being driven in a stretch limo in Manhattan when they stopped at a red light. There were a bunch of girls on the corner, waiting to cross. But due to the limo's darkened windows, they couldn't see who was inside. Elvis turned to John and said: "Watch this." He pressed the button to lower the window on his side. Of course there was complete pandemonium and screaming when the girls realized who they were seeing. As the light changed and the limo drove away, without another word, Elvis slowly closed the window again.
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stoneunhinged
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Arthur, I recall other threads where I wanted to jump in and defend Elvis against accusations of pedophilia (ephebophilia was more likely), but your comment reminds me that Elvis lived in another world altogether. When Elvis met Nixon, it was (as I recall) about drugs. Elvis thought drugs were evil. Yet drugs killed him. OK, one might say: Elvis made a distinction between legal and illegal drugs (and maybe he did). Yet Elvis took drugs that you and I would not have had access to.

The story of Elvis (forgive me for preaching again, Laurie) is the story of a human being who experienced something that no one else on planet Earth had ever previously experienced. These days, it's common. Kim Kardashian might provoke the same interest as the Elvis of John Phillip's story. But for Elvis it was pioneer territory.

What's more is that Elvis helped to create the territory. We live in a world that is, in part (a large part) created by Elvis. Did he always know what he was creating? I don't think so. I don't think he knew at all. Nevertheless, he created something totally new. John Phillips saw that personally.

Was he a pervert? No. He suffered from a stunted sexual growth that stemmed from the territory he pioneered. He was forever 17, and liked girls a couple of years younger. It's weird, but not perverted. Was he a drug addict? Yes. But he had no idea that he was one, since the drugs were always prescribed by doctors. Of course, Elvis could get any prescription he wanted. But did he know that?

What Elvis knew is that he could roll down the window and have the girls freak out. The Beatles found that out, too; but they went through it together. Elvis walked his road alone.

The last time we got into Elvis here at the Café there was a lot of BS written, and the scholar in me--as well as the fan--objects to the BS. At the very least, one might read a biography (I highly recommend the one by Peter Guralnick). But even a quick glance at the Wikipedia article would shatter a few myths. (Hermit: Priscilla didn't move into Graceland until 1962; nobody but you has ever suggested otherwise.) Elvis was--by all accounts--a kind, generous, innocent man who was unaware of the fury he had unleashed.

But unleash it he did. And our world is better for it.
stoneunhinged
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OK: I admit that I posted without watching the third video Laurie posted. I'm 15 minutes in, and it's a winner! Watch it, folks, even if you could care less about Elvis. It's a good story.
irossall
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"What Elvis knew is that he could roll down the window and have the girls freak out. The Beatles found that out, too; but they went through it together. Elvis walked his road alone."

Frank Sinatra "Walked his road alone" as well, BEFORE Elvis and the Beatle's.

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stoneunhinged
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Yes, Frank walked it. I even thought about Frank as I typed.

It's a difference of degree, not of kind.

No disrespect intended to Frank whatsoever.
stoneunhinged
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BUT: isn't it telling that we talk about Elvis's sexual proclivities, and not Frank's?

Elvis unleashed something that Frank (and please, let us not forget Bing!) did not. I'm not wise enough to know what it was; I'm smart enough to observe that it was.
magicalaurie
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Quote:
On Mar 16, 2016, stoneunhinged wrote:
What Elvis knew is that he could roll down the window and have the girls freak out.


While I appreciate the offering of it, I didn't respond to Arthur's story because it's cliche as Elvis goes, in my opinion. Men seem to focus on Elvis' ability to inspire girls to freak out. If you've viewed the video above, you'll note something I find more significant: Elvis inspired most of the men to do the same, in their own way. People love Elvis. Period. That's my point. That's where he's really made a serious mark. Some are quite jealous, I think, because they see he's a regular guy and I think they suppose he doesn't deserve all that. So they feel a need to knock him down, it seems. Same point's made anyway, 'cause they sure spend a lot of energy trashing him.

Thanks, E Smile

Quote:
On Mar 16, 2016, irossall wrote:
Frank Sinatra "Walked his road alone" as well, BEFORE Elvis and the Beatle's.

Smile Iven


Elvis was a collaborator. Smile I think you'll note Elvis acknowledged Sinatra quite readily.

Here's a cool vid. I wonder if someone might be able to clean up the audio- I don't think I can, I know that much Smile Still learning in the audio dept, indeed. Smile

Tom Cutts
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Quote:
On Mar 16, 2016, stoneunhinged wrote:
Yes, Frank walked it. I even thought about Frank as I typed.

It's a difference of degree, not of kind.

No disrespect intended to Frank whatsoever.

I disagree. It was very much a similar degree. The difference is that Frank lived to a ripe old age, became an old man, surrendered the image of superstar playboy. Elvis (and others) died and so did not have to relinquish his charms to the ravages of time.
stoneunhinged
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Tom, while everything you said is true, it nevertheless doesn't account for the sea change that came with Elvis. If I were to put on my philosopher's hat, I would talk about post-world-war-2 culture. If I were to put on my fan's hat, I would tal about Milk-Cow Blues (let's get real gone for a change). But it doesn't matter: Frank (whom I love; no lie!) didn't change the face of the world we live in. Elvis did. Why and how and to what purpose is something for smarter people than myself to discuss. But it is so. Recognizing this fact is just plain history. That Mr Unhinged can't explain it adequately is...ah...Steve Brook's fault. Doesn't make either of us wrong.
ed rhodes
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Another one, this one I remember the title to; Bubba Hotep, Bruce Campbell plays an Elvis impersonator who insists he's the real Elvis. Seems, when everything was falling apart, he offered to switch places with an Elvis impersonator (also played by Campbell) with the understanding th he'd keep evidence as to who he actually was, which then got destroyed when his trailer blows up. He gets put into an assisted living facility when he blows out his hip falling offstage. Now the only person who believes him is Ossee Davis, who insists he's actually JFK! ELVIS: Uh Jack, I don't want to upset you, but Kennedy was a white guy. JACK: You see! They did this to me to hide me better! And THAT'S not even the odd part. Elvis begins to suspect the high rate of death in the facility is due to a mummy that went missing thirty years ago, and he and Jack have to figure out how to destroy it! But the monster is just the MacGuffin, it's actually about aging with dignity and being true to yourself and your soul.
"There's no time to lose," I heard her say.
"Catch your dreams before they slip away."
"Dying all the time, lose your dreams and you could lose your mind.
Ain't life unkind?"
Tom Cutts
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Stone, would you care to share your top 3 changes which Elvis brought?
magicalaurie
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Quote:
On Mar 16, 2016, Tom Cutts wrote:
Quote:
On Mar 16, 2016, stoneunhinged wrote:
Yes, Frank walked it. I even thought about Frank as I typed.

It's a difference of degree, not of kind.

No disrespect intended to Frank whatsoever.

I disagree. It was very much a similar degree. The difference is that Frank lived to a ripe old age, became an old man, surrendered the image of superstar playboy. Elvis (and others) died and so did not have to relinquish his charms to the ravages of time.


Bah, Tom, there are plenty out there who say he was already relinquishing "his charms to the ravages of time" leading up to his passing in '77. You're spouting more of the stuff I cited above, I think.

Thing is, the charming never relinquish. Time doesn't ravage that. Your statement that it does is a mindset propaganda the world could stand to shift for a change. Spirit lives.





Tom Cutts
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Bah to you Laurie. Smile

Charms are absolutely at peril in the hands of Father Time.

Charming good looks... they fade with time.

Charming demeanor... well what is charming on a 40 year old could very easily be creepy on a 70 year old. Not to mention what was charming in the 70's has become offensive in the 2010s. So yeah, charm relinquishes to those who don't change with the times.
balducci
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These are before my time, but FWIW:

"The first known person to have been treated as a teen idol was Franz Liszt, the Hungarian pianist who, in the 1840s, drew such a following among young women that the term "Lisztomania" soon came to describe the phenomenon ... The reception that Liszt enjoyed as a result can be described only as hysterical. Women fought over his silk handkerchiefs and velvet gloves, which they ripped to shreds as souvenirs. This atmosphere was fuelled in great part by the artist's mesmeric personality and stage presence. Many witnesses later testified that Liszt's playing raised the mood of audiences to a level of mystical ecstasy."

"Rudy Vallee, who became a major success in 1929 with hits like "Honey" and "Deep Night", may have been the first American popular singer to have been idolised by hundreds of teen-aged girls at sold-out concerts."
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irossall
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"Rudy Vallee, who became a major success in 1929 with hits like "Honey" and "Deep Night", may have been the first American popular singer to have been idolised by hundreds of teen-aged girls at sold-out concerts."


I was going to mention Rudy Vallee but was afraid that too many here at the Café would correct me and say who's Rudy Vallee? Do you mean Frankie Valli? Smile
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stoneunhinged
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Quote:
On Mar 16, 2016, Tom Cutts wrote:
Stone, would you care to share your top 3 changes which Elvis brought?


No. Why bother?

If I were to say that a hurricane caused damaged, some smarty-pants would point out that something caused the hurricane, and thus was the real source of the damage. And that smarty-pants would be right, too! So there isn't much of a point in describing hurricanes.
magicalaurie
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I said something about spirit, Tom.

Since you've placed Frank Sinatra into a discussion of charm, I feel an overwhelming need to give mentions to Dean Martin and Sammy Davis Jr., since I think your definition of charm is skewed to say the least. You can't even back it up with your prime example. You say charm= looks, and then you say Frank Sinatra. Charm goes way deeper, and all the guys are duped because they can't get past Elvis' looks even while they're calling him a butt dumpling. Right. And Frank Sinatra's additional 40 years here were actually a disadvantage for Frank, Elvis' passing at 42 was a disadvantage for Frank, etc. Can we make more excuses for Frank, please? I'm sure he'd appreciate them.

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