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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Food for thought » » "Too Perfect" Theory (9 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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tommy
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One problem with people who worry much about perfection is that it can lead to the flaw of self-consciousness. We might call it the too perfect mind-set. One cannot perform with ease if one worries too much about making a mistake and constantly self-observing. Lennart Green says he does not do prestige and he gives some fine advice on this matter.
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

Tommy
Sudo Nimh
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Quote:
On May 18, 2016, Brad Burt wrote:
No. If folks are going to come up with a "method" they will do so no matter what....at least in my experience. Re the Cig thru Quarter...that's why many routines are strengthened by "convincers". The switch of a 'real' quarter for the gaffed. I've done the trick innumerable times to great effect. If the switch is good enough it really leaves folks with no where to go.

Prof Nightmare without a really good smooth false count is NOT the same routine. Just after the ropes are stretched it demands something to convince the folks that the ropes are not just trickily stretched out, but that they also separate entities, etc.

To be honest I don't remember the finer points of the theory because after I heard it discussed and read stuff....I just let the other guys mess with it. I couldn't see how it could make what I did better. Read Pop Haydn's stuff on the dilemma, etc. The whole point of a properly structured routine is that it simply leaves folks with no rational place to go. It couldn't be that because of.....and on and on in their minds.


I have to agree completely with this. Especially with the part about people coming up with a method, no matter what.

I performed at a venue once where a fella followed me around all night proclaiming that he knew how everything I did was done. His answer?

Sleight of hand. Smile
Magic which awakens and nourishes the divine spirit in man encourages the growth of true humanity, in contrast to the materialistic outlook which binds man to the earth.

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Pop Haydn
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If the only way a trick can be done is by the use of a stooge, or a duplicate, or twin--then that is not a good way to do it...that is what is meant by "too perfect"--not that there is no solution but that there is only one and nothing in the trick disproves that one method.

"Too Perfect" does not mean great magic. It means magic that is compromised by the method being the only possible method, and the routine leading the spectator to it.

Great, strong magic means that the spectator can think of "No Possible Method," "Too Perfect" magic leads the spectator to the solution.

It is sometimes possible to strengthen weak magic by adding red-herrings and false proofs. A torn corner might be a false proof.
tommy
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Circumstantial evidence allows a trier of fact to infer that a fact or explanation exists. For amusement, the magician leads his audience to infer that an absurd fact exists corresponding with his effect. Facts become absurd often by way of exaggeration; a twin can become an absurd amount of twins. Diamonds are Forever is a Bond film, with some pretty absurd plots with the villain not only stealing diamonds to use on a space laser but also giving extensive plastic surgery to both himself and his goons making doubles resulting in some quite magical scenes. If the villain had one double then it would be more reasonable but not as magical and amusing as the absurd number. It reminds me of the everywhere and nowhere effect.
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

Tommy
Jonathan Townsend
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Monk talks about (in the section "Can a trick be too perfect?" pages 14-15) how a slight glimmer of something, a hint of apparent imperfection, or as Ramsay would do it - a half feint- would improve how the audience appreciates a trick. Not about the method.

And if you seek out those pages and then look at how the signed version of the trick is done... you may feel some discomfort about imaginary imperfections evolving into methods.
...to all the coins I've dropped here
Pop Haydn
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It's sometimes good to show a little ankle, a flash of the pea. Ramsay would let people think they noticed something, and then show them they were wrong without pointing it out, almost in a secret game going on beneath the routine.
Dick Oslund
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YES~! I only saw John Ramsay perform ONCE (IBM/SAM CONVENTION, CHICAGO--1950). He remains, IMO, one of the >> GREAT << CLOSE UP MAGICIANS! I have seen and known
MANY great close up magicians, since! Performers like Dai Vernon, Johnny Thompson, Charlie Miller, Don Alan, et al, and, John Ramsay is definitely one of the group!
SNEAKY, UNDERHANDED, DEVIOUS,& SURREPTITIOUS ITINERANT MOUNTEBANK
tommy
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If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

Tommy
Dannydoyle
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Quote:
On Jan 5, 2017, Pop Haydn wrote:
If the only way a trick can be done is by the use of a stooge, or a duplicate, or twin--then that is not a good way to do it...that is what is meant by "too perfect"--not that there is no solution but that there is only one and nothing in the trick disproves that one method.

"Too Perfect" does not mean great magic. It means magic that is compromised by the method being the only possible method, and the routine leading the spectator to it.

Great, strong magic means that the spectator can think of "No Possible Method," "Too Perfect" magic leads the spectator to the solution.

It is sometimes possible to strengthen weak magic by adding red-herrings and false proofs. A torn corner might be a false proof.


It would seem to me, as you pointed out earlier in the thread, that not many actually seem to want to discuss the actual theory as put forth originally. Rather it seems as if many want to parse words and meaning to get to their own conclusions for some reason.

Ray earlier mentioned how "too simple" may have been a better term and it might be closer to my way of understanding.
Danny Doyle
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<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
tommy
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"Having the spectator find the bill when a performer has never been close is just too divine, and anyone with as much as one brain will be suspicious and be sure that it can't be the same bill."

Ted Annemann - 1935
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

Tommy
tommy
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Making a blind man see would be "too divine" for a magician and so they would figure the “blind man” must be a stooge.
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

Tommy
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