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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Did you hear the latest? » » Native American Magicians - Indigenous Illusionists (8 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Autumn Morning Star
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In the largest Native American Magazine published today, "Native Peoples Magazine", there is an article on Indigenous Illusionists. I have met about twelve Native magicians in all. Three are highlighted here. It is an honor to be a part of a growing group of Native American Indian Magicians: http://www.nativepeoples.com/Native-Peop......lusions/
Wonder is very necessary in life. When we're little kids, we're filled with wonder for the world - it's fascinating and miraculous. A lot of people lose that. They become cynical and jaded, especially in modern day society. Magic renews that wonder.
Doug Henning
charliemartin
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I live in South Dakota and can attest to the incredible skills of Rueben Fast Horse. He is a good friend.
Dick Oslund
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Ahnee Ahnishnaa? (Ojibwa--"hello! how are you?")

I never met him, but "Chief" BLACKSTAR was very well known in the Dakotas, and surrounding states, when I was a teen ager, in the '40s.

The TOPS magazine (Abbott's house organ) often carried stories about him. I believe he had several people in his company, and, presented relatively "stock" tricks and small illusions. He was very popular. I don't know his tribe, but, I imagine he was Lakota or Dakota (not "Sioux"!!!)

The late Ken Griffin, and his wife toured for many years all over the USA. He was a member of one of the southwest tribes, not Navajo (Dineh) or Apache or Zuni, I think it was a southern Arizona tribe, which has now changed its name to something in their own language, not, a name "given" to them by the "palefaces".

I'll try to look up Ken's obituary, and, pass that along. We were friends.

Buddy Big Mountain (Cherokee) is a ventriloquist, and tours many reservations. I haven't seen him for about 20 years, and, being retired, I don't get all the news.

My grandmother was French Canadian, and many of the early French Voyageurs (fur trade) married Ojibwa, Odawa, and Pottawatomi girls. I can't prove it but I believe I have a "drop or two" of Ojibwa blood. Grandma spoke French Canadian, but, did not speak any Ojibwa.

With my school show (magic) I performed at MANY reservation schools in the west, northwest, and southwest, (Navajo, Zuni, Apache, and Hopi) for National School Assemblies from 1985 until 2003.

I also played many Dakota, Lakota, Blackfoot, Omaha, Cheyenne, the "Five Civilized Tribes" Mandan et al,and "prairie" Ojibwa schools in the northern plains.

In my home "country", Michigan Wisconsin, and Minnesota, I did Ojibwa schools, too.

I'm a "language man" and always made an effort to learn at least a few of the "courtesy words", wherever I went. I traveled in a station wagon when I first started touring. I was booked in the tiny village of CANNONBALL, NO. DAKOTA (south of Bismarck)for an early afternoon program, and I drove down from a late morning program in Bismarck. It was my first tour of the Dakotas, and, I was "learning" the towns. I planned to have lunch in Cannonball. When I arrived, I found a small grocery store, a post office, and the elementary school! I figured I could drive back to Bismarck after the Cannonball school, and, have a late lunch. I entered the school, looking at my itinerary sheet. The principal's name was Gladys Little Dog. When we met, I said, "Shunka Chisdela"? (Little Dog in Lakota). She looked surprised, and, asked "You speak our language?" I replied, "No, just a few words." She was impressed, and, then asked, "Have you had lunch?" I said, "No, but, I can wait until I get back to Bismarck." She said, "I was just going to the lunch room. Please join me." We had a delightful visit, and a fine lunch. When the kids came into the gym, they were shy, and very polite. She introduced me, and added, "This man speaks some of our language!" The kids giggled. I greeted them with "Hau, Hunhanni waste"! They were a delightful audience!
SNEAKY, UNDERHANDED, DEVIOUS,& SURREPTITIOUS ITINERANT MOUNTEBANK
Autumn Morning Star
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Today, I corrected grammar in
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Quote:
On Nov 3, 2016, charliemartin wrote:
I live in South Dakota and can attest to the incredible skills of Rueben Fast Horse. He is a good friend.

Ha, I am talking to Reuben right now on the phone!
Wonder is very necessary in life. When we're little kids, we're filled with wonder for the world - it's fascinating and miraculous. A lot of people lose that. They become cynical and jaded, especially in modern day society. Magic renews that wonder.
Doug Henning
charliemartin
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Awesome.
charliemartin
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Awesome.
charliemartin
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Having planned 2 magic conventions, we were always looking for something different. I think we have found the next show. The Native American MAGIC Show. IBM? SAM?
ringmaster
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One of the most magical stage shows I ever saw was at a reservation casino years back, it featured a huge Peppers Ghost in the Spirit Lodge.
Less than 2% of reported UFO's turn out to be actual interplanetary vehicles.
Dick Oslund
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I'm not going to reprint my rather long post above (November 3, 2016) although I note that three people "liked" it.

I did promise to check my files for Ken Griffin's obituary. It took a bit of "anthropological digging", but I found it.

Ken was an Indigenous Illusionist who brought his show to people across America. He was born September 5, 1914, near Jester, Oklahoma, the youngest of ten children. The family moved to Kansas, and, later to Deming, New Mexico. He graduated from high school, and learned the trade of saddle maker, and leather carver. He moved to Hollywood, California, where he became known for his skilled craftsmanship. Many of his saddles have appeared in the Tournament of Roses Parade.

His second career, as a magician lasted more than forty years. He and his lovely wife, Roberta, blended their five children into one family. It was a "family" illusion show, that played mostly "phone promotion" dates in small towns across America. I first saw him perform at an Abbott Get Together in Colon, Michigan. I last saw him perform at the Society of American Magicians Convention in Florida in 1977. He and Roberta published a book on how to produce a small illusion show. One of the features of the show was a Warneke (aga) levitation.

Ken passed away at his home in Burbank, California, January 28, 1987, according to his obituary in "GENII". Ken and Roberta had been honored for their work in magic by The Academy of Magical Arts, several years before Ken's death.
SNEAKY, UNDERHANDED, DEVIOUS,& SURREPTITIOUS ITINERANT MOUNTEBANK
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