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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Latest and Greatest? » » Peeled Coin by Lloyd Barnes (7 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Nick-V.
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Great idea. Nothing like doing an effect no one has ever seen. Great creativity here.

Next Goal .... State Quarters and Updated Currency all around.
Peace on the Magical Streets
~Nick V.~
videoman
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I remember buying a half dollar coin many years ago that looks to be kind of similar in construction.
It's purpose was to be used as a kicker to a karate coin routine where the second time you did it your finger went into the edge rather than through the face.
I'm sure I still have it in a drawer somewhere. Anyone else remember that gaff?
tonsofquestions
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On Sep 27, 2017, PhilJake wrote:
Hi spectators, did you know that quarters used to be called two bits. Well in the old days the Spanish Real de a Ocho or the Eight Royals Coin was commonly known as a piece of eight. It was worth 8 reales and was often split into 8 pieces or 8 bits each worth 1 reales to make change. So two bits is a quarter of a piece of eight and that's why we have quarters and why the slang name for them is two bits. Heck even cents are named after Spanish centavos. I was doing some research about the origin of two bits and I discovered that some of those old copper clad quarters, the ones with the eagle on the back, sometimes split in half. That's why the mint switched to the new state quarters. I have been practicing how to split them into two bits but I can only do it with the old style quarters. The new state quarters have a stronger copper nickel clad. Does anyone have one of those old quarters so we can see how well it is made?


I have to say that I really enjoyed this patter. Excellent justification of why it makes sense to try and split it, *and* why it has to be an old quarter. I've made that justification for the Sacajawea dollars before, I just didn't think through far enough on this one. So thanks!

In fact, I think it makes me like the use of a quarter for it than the half dollar coins I'd normally rather use. It could be a cool follow-on if you go deeper - start with a half dollar and split it into two quarters then follow up with this.
tonsofquestions
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On Sep 28, 2017, videoman wrote:
I remember buying a half dollar coin many years ago that looks to be kind of similar in construction.
It's purpose was to be used as a kicker to a karate coin routine where the second time you did it your finger went into the edge rather than through the face.
I'm sure I still have it in a drawer somewhere. Anyone else remember that gaff?


I don't recall that one, but it sounds interesting, and I'd be interested to learn more.
Do you mean that the hole was on the edge rather than centered? Or that the coin turned into a C (rather than an O) where your finger came in from the side?
Mb217
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On Sep 27, 2017, Mb217 wrote:
Y'know, I thought Mr. Barnes left coins behind long ago...Guess not completely, and I'm so happy he didn't. Smile This is a nice idea. I always wondered what would come from the Bent Coin and the Karate Coin, just what would be next?...And so this idea seems to be progressively it. And you know the great, Jay Sankey is somewhere shaking his head saying, "Now why didn't I think of that?" Smile Very clever! Smile

As a decent-at-best coin guy, I clearly see the benefits of this as real thinking and progress as to this magical genre of impossibilia. Simple enough moves make the magic happen in an absolutely impossible way. Believe me, the visual of the coin appearing to be split in two will be shocking to spectators, progressively more so than the popular bending of a coin. This is better, more amazing IMHO. Smile

It's a trick that people will remember you by, done at the right time in a bar or at a fancy party, it will be amazingly remembered. And glad he thought to also do this in American quarters, could half dollars be far behind? Smile I can already see that this will last you a lifetime, easy-to-do brilliant anyway you decide to present it, restore or not. Definitely will pack small and play BIG!

Lloyd continues to let some brilliant things out of his head that weren't quite here before he did it, or did it so much more amazing and better. Peeled Coin is another winner from this young man. What a wonderful impromptu trick to do anyplace, anytime, anywhere you go.



The more I think, watch the video, and read here about this new release from Lloyd, the more I really like it...Man it looks good! Smile

www.ellusionist.com/peeled-coin-by-lloyd-barnes.html

*Oh, and I think the "old quarter - new quarter" thing is an easy-enough get around as to this. You could (should) just always carry the extra old quarter on you (as I always carried a extra regular half dollar when doing my "Crimp Karate Koin") and offer it out rather than ask for a quarter. Or you could pull out some change or have some lying on a table, and casually give them the old quarter from it. A few things you can do that would not raise any suspicion in the presentation of this impromptu effect.
*Check out my latest: The MB Tanspo PLUS, MB's Morgan, Copper Silver INC, Double Trouble, FlySki, Crimp Change - REDUX!, and other fine magic at gumroad.com/mb217magic Smile


"Believe in YOU, and you will see the greatest magic that ever was." -Mb Smile
normative
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You can do that, of course, but if you’re doing something with a gaff coin—and especially if the manifest abnormality of the coin is itself the effect—I think it’s just always going to be a lot weaker if you can’t create the extra layer of logic buffer between effect & method that a borrowed coin provides. Because sure, using your own coin isn’t inherently suspicious, but any adult’s *immediate* thought when you peel it is going to be “oh, that must not have been a normal coin after all.” It takes a lot longer (relative to the duration of the effect) to backtrack to “could my coin have been switched out at some point?”—and usually you can have it back in their hands reestablishing the premise “this is the normal coin from my pocket” before they get there.

If they get there FIRST, your convincer isn’t doing the easy job of cementing their default belief (“that’s my normal coin”) anymore. Now you’re trying to defeat the already formulated hypothesis “trick coin.” And they’re going to find it a lot easier to defend that hypothesis against an ex-post attempt to defeat it than it would be to formulate it for the first time at the end of the effect, normal coin in hand, with its ordinariness “proven” at both ends.

Realistically, an intelligent spectator who decides to burn brain cycles on it after the fact IS going to be able to eventually reconstruct how an effect like this must have worked. And that’s ultimately OK by me provided there’s enough lag in the backtrack process that it doesn’t happen fast enough to step on their emotional response to the trick in progress. Because then they’ve gotten the experience you were aiming to create, and ideally that sense of astonishment is pleasant enough that it ends up dampening the impulse to go into puzzle-solving mode later. Without that extra layer of logic buffer, though, they’re apt to get there fast enough that it preempts the experience from playing out, at which point you’ve really got more of a visual gag than a proper magical effect.
magicmind
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It is kind of appealing (pun) to watch the tear/split. The reparation, not so much.
mh1001
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Normative, your first paragraph reminds me of what I said, earlier. So I 100% agree with your comment in general. This is another example of why there are tricks that are good and tricks that aren't, for the same reasons there are good and bad magicians.

Unlike a coin bend, this kind of performance doesn't seem real. It can't. But if you can create an effect in which the coin can split slowly, in full view, the spectators will be much more convinced that it actually happened, even though it would remain less real than a coin bend. This is why, when I do coin bending, I use the optical bend. People can see it bend in "real time". With Peeled, they don't see the process, they don't see the coin melting and changing its shapes. They see the beginning and the end, not the process.
mantel
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On Sep 27, 2017, MeetMagicMike wrote:
This is fun but I don't think it will be perceived as magic. It's a stunt like tearing a phone book in half or knocking the bottom out of a beer bottle.


I agree. However some performers will be able to make this work. But I don't see how most spectators won't see it for what it is. Which in my opinion is why Lloyd filmed the current demo in studio rather than in the real world with spectators.

It's too bad there is no easy way to DIY as then the performer could leave it with their spectators, as you can with the other stunts you mentioned.
pegasus
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I won't be restoring mine nor handing it out for examination. I will simply give them their borrowed coin back, after apologising that I ruined "their" one, which I had ditched in my pocket beforehand.
videoman
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There is a lot of covering of the coin during the peeling and then squeezing it back together, which I think you can probably get away with when first splitting the coin because they don't know what to expect.

But if you squeeze it back together people are really going to be burning your hands to see if the coin ever leaves their sight. And of course it does, so any spec who is the least bit skeptical is going to want to see if anything is in your hands because they will naturally suspect you switched the coin.

For anyone who is an advanced coin worker who can make this look super clean, then it may be an okay effect. But unfortunately for most of us I'm afraid it's going to look like you're doing exactly what you're doing. Although I suppose you might get away with doing some type of shuttle pass and immediately squeeze it tight in your closed fist while your dirty hand takes something out of your pocket to wave over it. The clean up would probably be best if you used a TKO, Topit, or even just sleeving.
tonsofquestions
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On Sep 29, 2017, mh1001 wrote:
Unlike a coin bend, this kind of performance doesn't seem real. It can't. But if you can create an effect in which the coin can split slowly, in full view, the spectators will be much more convinced that it actually happened, even though it would remain less real than a coin bend. This is why, when I do coin bending, I use the optical bend. People can see it bend in "real time". With Peeled, they don't see the process, they don't see the coin melting and changing its shapes. They see the beginning and the end, not the process.


In the trailer, the performer does just that - a slow split that's very similar to the "real time" bend, and uses the same concept. It works well, though is a bit more obvious for the split than the bend, especially if you know what you're looking for. But definitely still possible to see the process here.
MeetMagicMike
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There are lot's of potential handlings to be explored. I think a spellbound move would be an effective way to close the split. This coin could also be deep backclipped and would lie mostly against the back of the hand in a way that a normal coin wouldn't. It would be fun to play with.
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mh1001
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On Sep 29, 2017, tonsofquestions wrote:
In the trailer, the performer does just that - a slow split that's very similar to the "real time" bend, and uses the same concept. It works well, though is a bit more obvious for the split than the bend, especially if you know what you're looking for. But definitely still possible to see the process here.

No. That's not what I saw. And spectators won't see or feel anything like this anyway. It's nothing like a "real time" peel. They don't see the moment when the coin begins to split at its edge. And it uses cover (both hands!). The revelation is not super convincing, but even worse is the restoration. It's not due to Lloyd's performance, it's due to the nature of the gimmick.
Mb217
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On Sep 29, 2017, tonsofquestions wrote:
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On Sep 29, 2017, mh1001 wrote:
Unlike a coin bend, this kind of performance doesn't seem real. It can't. But if you can create an effect in which the coin can split slowly, in full view, the spectators will be much more convinced that it actually happened, even though it would remain less real than a coin bend. This is why, when I do coin bending, I use the optical bend. People can see it bend in "real time". With Peeled, they don't see the process, they don't see the coin melting and changing its shapes. They see the beginning and the end, not the process.


In the trailer, the performer does just that - a slow split that's very similar to the "real time" bend, and uses the same concept. It works well, though is a bit more obvious for the split than the bend, especially if you know what you're looking for. But definitely still possible to see the process here.



Agreed!
*Check out my latest: The MB Tanspo PLUS, MB's Morgan, Copper Silver INC, Double Trouble, FlySki, Crimp Change - REDUX!, and other fine magic at gumroad.com/mb217magic Smile


"Believe in YOU, and you will see the greatest magic that ever was." -Mb Smile
pegasus
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The gradual splitting of the coin is what sold it to me. Looks very convincing imo.
tonsofquestions
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On Sep 29, 2017, mh1001 wrote:
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On Sep 29, 2017, tonsofquestions wrote:
In the trailer, the performer does just that - a slow split that's very similar to the "real time" bend, and uses the same concept. It works well, though is a bit more obvious for the split than the bend, especially if you know what you're looking for. But definitely still possible to see the process here.

No. That's not what I saw. And spectators won't see or feel anything like this anyway. It's nothing like a "real time" peel. They don't see the moment when the coin begins to split at its edge. And it uses cover (both hands!). The revelation is not super convincing, but even worse is the restoration. It's not due to Lloyd's performance, it's due to the nature of the gimmick.


You might want to rewatch it - specifically the split ~1:47 on. It definitely has a similarity in feel to a real-time bend. I thought the second half was rushed, but the beginning looked very nice to me, even if I knew what was going on.

I agree the restoration looks too suspicious - I'd personally do a switch where I continue to show the "together" half of the coin visible above the fingers (first condition once on this "pinching" (but hidden) position - and then you can mime squeezing the bottom half of the coin while the top half remains visible.
mh1001
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Even if the splitting looks like a real-time split, which isn't (and I don't need to watch it a 3rd time to understand that), the number 1 problem is the restoration. It's not real. This is more than enough to make the trick feels "unreal" to a spectator. Of course, some will believe, but some definitely won't.
pegasus
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On Oct 1, 2017, mh1001 wrote:
Even if the splitting looks like a real-time split, which isn't (and I don't need to watch it a 3rd time to understand that), the number 1 problem is the restoration. It's not real. This is more than enough to make the trick feels "unreal" to a spectator. Of course, some will believe, but some definitely won't.


Perhaps work on your coin handling skills??
mh1001
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I'm not surprised, you missed the point. I explained already there are bad and good tricks and why this one is a good illustration. I don't expect you can understand that, though.
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