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Tom Dobrowolski
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You can now download the eBook version of "all done by coindness..." the semi automatic money magic notes through Big Blind Media!

http://www.bigblindmedia.com/all-done-by......i-ebook/

All Done by Coindness eBook from Tom Dobrowolski and Friends - self-working, super easy and semi-automatic coin magic!!!

Contents:

Inverted Matrix the Easy Way - Curtis Kam
This take on the matrix kickback was published in Curtis Kam's first book, All the World is a Stage. This routine fooled a number of the contributors to this volume the first time they saw it. And it is the easiest reverse matrix in the world.

Matrix 21 - Curtis Kam
Having left all of his fancy expensive silver coins, the magician elects to do some magic with his spare pocket change. Out of his purse he removes some small change. He proceeds to perform a matrix with these coins and four cards. In the end three of the coins vanish and reappear inside the purse.

Whole-Hearted Hopping - Tom Dobrowolski
I have been playing with this routine for some time now. It is an outgrowth of hop- ping halves, but plays up the "not working out for the magician gag" by incorporating some other effects. It has evolved from Carl Andrew's Short Hop.

Chocolate Coins - Jeff Prace
3 chocolate coins are dumped from an M&M's bag. One by one the coins vanish and reappear back inside the candy bag. In the end a real purse with three half dollars inside is dumped from the candy bag.

Soft Coins Redux - Tomas Bloomberg
This is the coolest presentation for the Tenyo trick, Soft Coins ever.

George is on my Mind - Eric Rose
One of the easiest ways to lower the sleight of hand requirements for money magic is to turn to the realm of mentalism. In this effect the serial number of a dollar bill from the audience is mentally discovered. This routine was developed a decade ago when Eric was performing at tradeshows.

Impromptu Hornswoggled - Bill Wheeler
The magician claims to have invented a way to scam people by making them think you have more money than you do with a trick count. He demonstrates by showing four dollars and attempting to count them as eight. The count doesn't prove to be that deceptive until the magician proves it and gets a generous tip!

Make Believe - John Carey
John says-The beautiful coin effect, The Fading Coin by Tomoyuki Takahashi, first published in Genii magazine is one of those little gems that only pop up ever so often. Imagination games combined with magic always seem to register strongly with the public. The great Eugene Burger has featured his presentation of this piece in his work for many years. I loved it but wanted a stand up version and only needing one coin. The classic copper silver coin and a little swindle happily achieves my objective.

Mutual Exchange - John Carey
Simply put, this is another method for the classical copper silver coin transposition. But the good news is it's almost self working. If you can hold two coins at your fingertips, you can do this effect!

The Big Penny - Oliver Corpuz
One of my good friends has a two year old daughter named Ketzi. Whenever I see her she immediately asks to see my pocket change, at which point she will hand me a coin and ask me to "make it big!" A jumbo coin is a common ending for good reason. But you don't need to be a sleight of hand master to produce one. You could do something as simple as what I do for Ketzi every time I see her.

Breakout - Ryan Bliss
3 coins are cleanly and clearly placed in an Okito Box and the lid is placed covering the box. Ly Instantly the box is flipped over with one hand and the 3 coins are shown to have vanished out of the box. A split second later, a clink is heard in the other hand and when it is opened the 3 coins are now inside the other hand.

Wave Vanish - Ryan Bliss
Three coins are held at the fingertips. With a wave, one coin vanishes followed by the second and third coin leaving nothing in the hands. The coins can then be reproduced from another location such as a purse or an Okito box. I think what Ryan does here is as close as we will ever come to the appearance of sleight-less coin vanishes. The sequence is pretty, open, and practically a special effect in appearance.

3x3 Transposition - Jeremiah Zuo
Three coins (a half dollar, English penny, and Chinese coin) are laid in a line on the table and proceed to transpose with each other in a rapid series of transformations. If you care to know, the silver and Chinese switch places, then the copper and Chinese switch places, then the Chinese and silver, then the silver and the copper . . . you follow? Best of all it’s virtually self working!

Ultimate Progressive Coin Assembly - Jeremiah Zuo
A tiny bit of cow (a leather coin purse) is introduced. Three coins are dumped from it, which along with three ordinary playing cards will be used for a bit of magic. After a bit of magical pingpong (3x3 Transposition above) each of the coins is placed underneath a different card in a line on the table. The copper coin vanishes from underneath the first card and joins the silver. Both coins vanish from underneath the second card and join the Chinese coin. All three coins vanish from underneath the final card and reappear inside the coin purse.
mike donoghue
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An excellent set of notes with doable entertaing effects that work & hit hard in the real world.

Mike Donoghue
Tom Dobrowolski
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Thanks Mike! Appreciate the kind comments and support!
Craigers
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For those beginners in coin magic like myself, be aware that quite a few of these tricks require very specific gimmicks that most beginners probably won't have lying around. To do the full monty will require investment.
Craigers
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In fact, when I think about it, I'm a wee bit miffed, because the ad copy does not mention this and I would not have bought the ebook if I'd known beforehand what additional items were needed to regular coins in order to perform most of the tricks
tonsofquestions
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Can you expand on that a little bit? I was also considering this, and have some of the most common gaffs, but possibly not the more unusual ones you mention.

Feel free to PM me with more, if you'd prefer.
trickiewillie
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Sadly, not only do these effects need specialized coin gimmicks, they are not self-working or semi-automatic, as the ad says. You need to be able to execute a shuttle pass, retension vanish, various plams and more..

The gimmicks include basic fare like C/S coin, Chinese coins, a 21-cent set, but mostly are not basic ones like a sh##l or fl###er. You need a special "sh##l-fl###er-mag##t" coin for one trick. You need a special kind of Okito box. For one trick the author had to make the gimmick himself by drilling holes in the coins.

The ad is very misleading.
Craigers
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Tonsofquestions, I guess trickiewillie has summed this up nicely above. Completely agree with him and I'm so p*ssed off with the completely misleading ad now that I've looked more closely at this
tonsofquestions
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Thanks for the extra info, I really appreciate it. I agree that it's very misleading to say "self working" if the majority are not, and likewise if it's hard to get the gaffs. You should email BBM to complain!

That said, I find your categorizations slightly surprising - I'd call a sh##l basic, but a 21-cent unusual - I don't see those in many places, anymore. That said, it doesn't take away the fact that an OXF (if that's what you mean) or drilled coin is not basic, and that should be made clearer upfront if they're going to push the "semi automatic" line for these...

Thanks again.
Killertweety
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Craigers and Trickiewillie, thank you very much for your comments.

I was about to buy this when I thought ... look up some reviews first because this sounds a bit too good to be true, and we all know what that often means ... .
I have one of BBM's 'Self Working Card Trick's' DVD's and while most of the tricks included are indeed very easy to do and baffling for sure, a wee bit of not-so-self-working moves are needed to get the most out of those tricks. Nothing too difficult, but still ... .

Nen dikke merci as we say in Belgium Smile
Ray Haining
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Nowhere does Tom Dobrowolski claim that these tricks are for beginners. Nowhere does he claim the tricks are gaffless. The only claim that is stretching it a bit is "self-working."

I can think of just one trick that is self-working using ordinary, non-gaffed coins, and that is Thieves and Sheep. I'm sure there are others, but there cannot be very many.

"Self-working" is a relative term. Theoretically, placing a stack of coins on a table, going to the kitchen to have lunch, coming back and having all four coins distributed on the four corners of the table--that is a self-working coin trick.

Any trick requires moves, even if they are merely a shuffle and a cut, or cards simply dealt out, or a coin placed in your hand. To any person who is interested in and/or performs magic, a coin trick with just one or two FPs is, for all intents and purposes, a self-working trick. Nothing in this set of lecture notes is difficult. Perhaps "nearly self-working" would have been a more appropriate description of the tricks.

The first trick in the notes is a coin assembly by Curtis Kam. It uses a gimmick referred to above as one that is made by "drilling holes in the coins." Sounds formidable, doesn't it? This is merely the way Curtis Kam himself makes his gimmick. He goes an extra step, being the professional he is, but this is not necessary. There is no need to drill holes in coins to create this gimmick. This gimmick was also used by Aldo Colombini and, I believe, Mike Gallo. It makes the coin assembly and kickback super-easy--so easy, in fact, you feel guilty doing it--yet the effect is very visual and a fooler.

The 21-cent gimmick used in the second Curtis Kam trick I was unfamiliar with. But the plot of this trick is a new one, as far as I know (but as things go, there's probably someone else who has thought of this before): it is a coin assembly with different coins, but instead of a kickback, three coins vanish leaving only one under the card and the vanished ones are found in a purse. Very clean and it appears you are using just regular coins (penny, nickel, dime) instead of half dollars, coins which nobody uses anymore.

Sure, two of the tricks use a Schoolcraft coin, OXF, which is a rather expensive item I don't own. So what? Some people do have this coin, and if the routines were something I think I could use, I can save up my money and go out and buy one.

One trick uses a Craig Ousterling Okito coin box. It appears to have some special properties. But it is interesting--I hadn't heard of it before. Dobrowolski says that it comes with a companion booklet edited by Kainoa Harbottle with an introduction by Curtis Kam. Something to look into. The routine using this coin box is as easy as pie.

This is a fine set of lecture notes. There are a lot of good, easy-to-do tricks in it. I liked the last two especially. I think the last trick is also a fairly new plot.

Quite frankly, if the name of this set of lecture notes had been Lecture Notes No. 5, I would have purchased it anyway. I have all of Tom Dobrowolski's lecture notes, and they are all excellent--some of the best money I have spent in recent years on magic.
Craigers
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With all due respect Ray, when I see the words "self-working, super easy and semi-automatic coin magic!!!", I'm thinking to myself "Brilliant...sounds great for beginners.... what could be better for beginners than self working, super easy and semi automatic". you are correct in saying that nowhere does he claim that the tricks are gaffless, but nowhere does he state that one trick involves drilling holes in coins and some of the other tricks require pretty specialized items. I still claim that the ad is worded to sound like its ideal for beginners and does not give enough information to allow potential buyers to decide if this is something for them.
tonsofquestions
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I have to agree with Craigers here. If I see "super easy", I don't necessarily assume that it will be sleight-less, but I would think it doesn't require anything complicated ... so beginners could do it. "Automatic" makes me think the same.

Similarly on the gaff front - I don't mind not talking about common gaffs that most people have. But beginners might not have the means (or knowledge) to drill holes in things, and it would be nice to know that upfront.

If all that knowledge - without having bought it - might change my decision (or happiness) about buying the ebook, then I think it should be made clear.
Ray Haining
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Geez guys, read what I said about that trick that uses coins with holes drilled in them. It is not necessary to do that to make the gimmick. That is only Curtis Kam's approach, which makes the gimmick more durable, and so if you were to do this trick using this method, you might want to do what Kam does and make a gimmick by drilling holes in the coins. But it is not necessary.

Part of the confusion here is equating "self-working" with "for beginners." They are not the same. These are quality tricks, most definitely not for beginners. Who does lectures on tricks for beginners?

Magicians do lectures for magicians. Maybe since "Craigers" and "tonsofquestions" appear to be new to magic, they are unaware of Tom Dobrowolski's reputation. If somebody more famous, such as, say, David Roth or Curtis Kam, were to offer lecture notes for sale and said some of the tricks were self-working, there would be no need to indicate whether or not gimmicks are used in any of the tricks. If they are, they are. If they're not, they're not. But everybody would know that the material offered would be first-class. It is the same for these lecture notes.

Again, "self-working" does not mean "for beginners." As I said, "self-working" may be a bit of a stretch, but as I also said, any coin trick involving just one or two FPs is, to a magician, self-working. If you are a beginner and want to learn coin magic, start with Bobo's. Leave the lecture notes for later, when you are more experienced.
Craigers
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Sorry to be persistant Ray, but NOWHERE in the ad do I see "Lecture notes". Ebook yes Lecture notes no. Please also consider the words from the Big Blind Media ad itself "Seriously, this eBook will inspire you to dive into the world of coin magic"....now then would you not agree that this is written to imply that the product is for those new to coin magic ??
tonsofquestions
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Please don't patronize me or make assumptions. I'm not new to magic, nor am I even new to *coin* magic.

Just because I may not have heard of a particular magician (again, an assumption, though correct this time) doesn't excuse poor descriptions.
And, for the record, searching for him on Vanishing Inc results in very few products: https://www.vanishingincmagic.com/search/?q=Tom%20Dobrowolski&fR[BrandIDs][0]=1, so it seems fairy easy to infer he's less well known, in general.

I have definitely seen well known magicians do beginner-style lectures, perhaps not all-round beginners *to magic* overall, but beginners to their preferred style. And I certainly agree with Craigers that something advertised as "this eBook will inspire you to dive into the world of coin magic" sure makes it seem approachable for folks that are not already coin magicians -- even if it also has material of interest for those who are.

Perhaps we have different definitions of "self-working"? Because while experienced magicians can (and often) do self-working tricks, if it requires fancy and/or difficult sleights it is, by definition, requiring complicated work from someone else. I hear you that you say it was a stretch, and I appreciate that concession. Yet the description also says "semi-automatic" (how is that different from self-working?) and "super easy", and complicated sleights are not. Yes, it's still relative, but when combined it sure seems like they're targeting beginners - which is a significant issue with their advertising if it's not.
Ray Haining
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"Craigers": I did not order my copy from Big Blind Media, so I don't know what their ad copy is. I was alerted to these notes by a thread on the Café (link given below). It clearly states that it is "A Lecture from Tom Dobrowolski and Friends." Check out this thread in its entirety.

Big Blind Media must have their own ad copy. I just checked Dobrowolski's website, and he doesn't use the term "self-working." Nor does he say that the tricks will inspire you to "dive into the world of coin magic." He does use the term "semi-automatic," which is what the tricks are. They are the easiest tricks imaginable. And yes, some use gaffs, some unusual gaffs. At the same time, they are all excellent effects.

"tonsofquestions": nobody's patronizing anyone. If you are not a beginner, why are you looking for material suitable for a beginner? You state: "I have definitely seen well known magicians do beginner-style lectures." Who?

You also should check out this thread:

www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.ph......18292#11
Tony Venetico
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This is probably the most deceiving ad I’ve seen in a long time - I like Tom, but this was quite the let down and I can’t help but feel swindled by the ad copy
tonsofquestions
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Ray: I sure feet like you were being condescending when you say "[they] appear to be new to magic, they are unaware of Tom Dobrowolski's reputation." The latter feels loaded with judgment, and the second doesn't in any way imply the first.

Just because I'm not a beginner doesn't mean I don't have my eyes open for good material (of any level) or possibly material to get young magicians I know excited by coins. I mind misleading advertising regardless of whether it's still useful to me - because I wasn't able to make an educated decision.

It is interesting that there are two different sets of ad copy - I had not seen the other thread previously. I agree that version is significantly less misleading, but we're talking about the copy and link here, since that's the one that was posted.

For your final question: have you ever been to one of the Penguin Expos? I'd say those mini-lectures every hour (and the bigger one they typically headline) are usually mostly geared at beginners. They contain some things that more advanced people could find useful/interesting, but the level is not that of other lecturers I've seen. I'd also say some of Penguin's are framed as an "into to XYZ" lecture - Rick's Laptop Lecture is one that comes to mind readily. Nothing against any of them, in any way. Just different target audiences.
Ray Haining
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Misleading advertising, hype, is the name of the game today. There is very little "truth in advertising." This is especially true in magic. I don't like it either.

But like I said, having read Tom Dobrowolski's previous lecture notes, I would have bought this set no matter what the ad copy. If some people feel they were misled, that's too bad, as the notes are first-rate. The tricks are excellent and are super-easy to perform, which is the unifying theme of these notes.

About the closest one will get to "self-working" coin tricks are those with gaffs. Scotch and Soda and Hopping Halves come to mind.

If one were new to coin magic, I would recommend Bobo's Modern Coin Magic (enlarged edition) and Kaufman's Coin Magic.

Some people, I think, look for tricks that will "do themselves," so they can sit back and take credit for being a magician without having to learn all those pesky sleights and moves.
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