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Rssudo
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So I've had my dads 8-ring set of linking rings for about 5 years and never got round to proper learning them. I can do a couple of links and unlinks however I've never properly learnt a routine.

Can anyone offer any advice as to a good starting point?
I'm aware its possible to get smaller close-up sets (referring to smaller diameter, not referring to # of rings). I'm aware of their merits, however I'd like to learn an 8-ring routine for cabaret/stage.
Thanks
Dougini
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Hi Rssudo! Welcome to the Café!

The Rings...yes. Where to begin. There are SO many routines and performance styles out there...anyone I mention is going to be copied, and I want to avoid that. Although to begin, copying the routine verbatim IS essential! It is the learning of YOUR OWN style and pace that is important. Do you dance? I compare the rings to The Zombie. They are a DANCE with the prop.

The routine I learned and performed for so many years was Ken Brooke's. He had a way of counting the rings in the beginning that I liked. But I made the rest my own. Only after years of doing KEN BROOKE. But I learned from a BOOK, so I did not do the English accent! LOL! The best ring routines I have seen lately are done by females. Galina, And a South Asian girl whose name escapes me at the moment.

But Ken's routine used an assistant from the audience. I believe Pop Haydn uses a similar approach. You count the rings separately and hand them to the vict- err, helper, to "do as I do". A bit of comedy ensues. The rest is "the dance". The flower opening, the rings cascading, all that is done to music (usually). But again, that's just ONE way. YOU have to find YOUR way. Learn a good link/unlink and a convincing count...that's first up.

Doug
thomasR
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It's not an 8-ring routine, but I would highly reccomend purchasing Pop Haydns 4-ring routine. It's available for download very affordable on his website. It's one of the best routines in magic, and will teach you several neat moves and counts you can use later in other routines as you wish. (Pops is so good, you may just do his routine and be quite satisfied!).
Rssudo
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Quote:
On Dec 1, 2017, Dougini wrote:
Hi Rssudo! Welcome to the Café!

The Rings...yes. Where to begin. There are SO many routines and performance styles out there...anyone I mention is going to be copied, and I want to avoid that. Although to begin, copying the routine verbatim IS essential! It is the learning of YOUR OWN style and pace that is important. Do you dance? I compare the rings to The Zombie. They are a DANCE with the prop.

The routine I learned and performed for so many years was Ken Brooke's. He had a way of counting the rings in the beginning that I liked. But I made the rest my own. Only after years of doing KEN BROOKE. But I learned from a BOOK, so I did not do the English accent! LOL! The best ring routines I have seen lately are done by females. Galina, And a South Asian girl whose name escapes me at the moment.

But Ken's routine used an assistant from the audience. I believe Pop Haydn uses a similar approach. You count the rings separately and hand them to the vict- err, helper, to "do as I do". A bit of comedy ensues. The rest is "the dance". The flower opening, the rings cascading, all that is done to music (usually). But again, that's just ONE way. YOU have to find YOUR way. Learn a good link/unlink and a convincing count...that's first up.

Doug


Thanks Doug! I'll check them all out and see what I come up with!
Rssudo
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On Dec 1, 2017, thomasR wrote:
It's not an 8-ring routine, but I would highly reccomend purchasing Pop Haydns 4-ring routine. It's available for download very affordable on his website. It's one of the best routines in magic, and will teach you several neat moves and counts you can use later in other routines as you wish. (Pops is so good, you may just do his routine and be quite satisfied!).

Thanks I'll give that one a look, what I meant about an 8-ring routine was In the long run I'm looking at working towards a stage routine and thus don't want to buy a brand new set of mini closeup rings. Anything that helps me learn a routine with full sized rings is great!
Magnus Eisengrim
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Pop's routine is excellent, but it requires a great deal of savvy from the performer. If you are not already a polished performer, you MAY find that Pop's routine doesn't work for you.

As mentioned above, there are many excellent routines in print. I began with the ancient Jack Miller booklet, and learned some moves. Once I had that in place, I learned the Dai Vernon symphony of the rings. I felt comfortable enough with that routine to perform it publicly. It was good, but it didn't quite fit me. For the past couple of years, I have been working a routine and patter better suited to myself as a performer. This journey took years.

(FWIW, I'm in the middle of a similar journey with the Miser's Dream. I've got the moves, but the routines fit me like someone else's shoes. But I know that with patience, I'll find out how I need to perform the routine.)
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
61magic
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Here are a few items to consider in selecting a routine. First do you perform with patter or silent? Second do you want to do a more fast flashy routine or something more slow and classical?
Do you do straight classic magic or comedy?
For silent routines Dai Vernon's classic 6 ring routine can be performed with patter or silent and is considered a classic.
A comedy routine would be Pop Haydn's routine, you can adapt it to silent but the comedy is list in the routine. The work of Jay Marshal uses a smaller ring for a comedy element.
For the slower classic routines the Ken Brooke 3 ring routine is very good. You can study that routine or the adaption by Aldo Colombini.
The flashy silent routine would be the work of Jeff McBride on the worlds Greatest Magic DVDs by L&L or his Magic on Stave Vol 1 DVD.
One note the McBride routines use some over the head moves that require a larger ring but again you can adapt.
Also for a variety of styles and routines Levent's DVD set on the Linking Rings is worth the price. There is enough material here to keep you busy for years.
Professor J. P. Fawkes
Rssudo
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On Dec 2, 2017, 61magic wrote:
Here are a few items to consider in selecting a routine. First do you perform with patter or silent? Second do you want to do a more fast flashy routine or something more slow and classical?
Do you do straight classic magic or comedy?
For silent routines Dai Vernon's classic 6 ring routine can be performed with patter or silent and is considered a classic.
A comedy routine would be Pop Haydn's routine, you can adapt it to silent but the comedy is list in the routine. The work of Jay Marshal uses a smaller ring for a comedy element.
For the slower classic routines the Ken Brooke 3 ring routine is very good. You can study that routine or the adaption by Aldo Colombini.
The flashy silent routine would be the work of Jeff McBride on the worlds Greatest Magic DVDs by L&L or his Magic on Stave Vol 1 DVD.
One note the McBride routines use some over the head moves that require a larger ring but again you can adapt.
Also for a variety of styles and routines Levent's DVD set on the Linking Rings is worth the price. There is enough material here to keep you busy for years.

Thanks! I might get the worlds greatest basic dvd for now.. currently do mainly closeup magic with patter bit never strictly comedy, and been pretty much the same for the past 7 years. I know id be more comfortable learning a close-up routine but I'm trying to force myself to expand to more stage/cabaret things - thinking going to spend my uni xmas vacation learning as much linking rings as I can...
Pop Haydn
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Quote:
On Dec 2, 2017, Rssudo wrote:
Quote:
On Dec 2, 2017, 61magic wrote:
Here are a few items to consider in selecting a routine. First do you perform with patter or silent? Second do you want to do a more fast flashy routine or something more slow and classical?
Do you do straight classic magic or comedy?
For silent routines Dai Vernon's classic 6 ring routine can be performed with patter or silent and is considered a classic.
A comedy routine would be Pop Haydn's routine, you can adapt it to silent but the comedy is list in the routine. The work of Jay Marshal uses a smaller ring for a comedy element.
For the slower classic routines the Ken Brooke 3 ring routine is very good. You can study that routine or the adaption by Aldo Colombini.
The flashy silent routine would be the work of Jeff McBride on the worlds Greatest Magic DVDs by L&L or his Magic on Stave Vol 1 DVD.
One note the McBride routines use some over the head moves that require a larger ring but again you can adapt.
Also for a variety of styles and routines Levent's DVD set on the Linking Rings is worth the price. There is enough material here to keep you busy for years.

Thanks! I might get the worlds greatest basic dvd for now.. currently do mainly closeup magic with patter bit never strictly comedy, and been pretty much the same for the past 7 years. I know id be more comfortable learning a close-up routine but I'm trying to force myself to expand to more stage/cabaret things - thinking going to spend my uni xmas vacation learning as much linking rings as I can...


I think you are on a good track. It is always good for a close-up worker to have at least twenty to thirty minutes of standup. A lot of times people want an hour or two of walk-around and a twenty minute show for the group. Being able to do a short standup routine that uses bigger props is a huge help. It is good to use things like the cut and restored rope and the rings, things that pack flat and can be performed surrounded. It is good to stretch, and I believe that performing standup informs your close-up work in a good way, and vice-versa. You learn to play more relaxed and intimate on stage by doing close-up, and you learn from standup how to make your close-up a bit bigger.
Dick Oslund
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Cf. Rssudo's post, above. He mentions Jeff McBride's using "over the head moves....The late Jay Marshall's five ring routine uses an over the head bit. Jay MADE HIS OWN RINGS (9")SO HE COULD DO THE "OVER THE HEAD-CATCHES ON THE NOSE" BIT.
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Dick Oslund
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I think that Whit and I had the same mother! (We think so much alike.) When I decided to 'move' from part time pro. to full time pro., over 50 years ago. I developed a show that could be presented, almost anywhere, for almost anybody.

Most of my 45 minute school show meets that criteria! I've had audiences of 2,000 in metropolitan areas, and I remember a few, with less than 50. (One, in a Galata, Montana school had 7 kids in the group.

I remember a very big corporate date, in a very metropolitan city. My agent said, "do 30 minutes. It's the company's centennial celebration. There will be at least 2,000 employees, AND, their FAMILIES."

The "room" was about the size of 1 1/2 football fields! A band was playing, and hundreds were dancing. A huge "Bar B Cue" pit, was serving "picnic style" hamburgers, hot dogs, ETC. A very long bar was serving steins of liquid refreshment. IIRC, there was a "bounce house" for the tiny kids! It was like an indoor "county fair"! (The only things missing were a Merry Go Round, Pony Rides, and a Ferris Wheel!) There was no way (or place) to do a stand up show. (The seating was "picnic style--scattered all over the huge room.)

It was a big fee date. I took a few appropriate props, (rope and ring, a few silks, a few golf balls, etc., "filled" my pockets, and, did a "walk around". I cut the patter (polka band) did highly visual stuff. and did almost an hour. The client was happy, the people were happy, I was HAPPY (big fee)!

In this business, we must be FLEXIBLE!
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Pete Biro
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Buy my book, THE REAL SECRET OF THE CHINESE LINKING RINGS. Stevens Magic sells it. Almost every known routine included.
STAY TOONED... @ www.pete-biro.com
trickbooks
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Since no one else mentioned it, I’ll just add Chris Capehart’s routine. I learned it on paper — I think it was a Stars of Magic print — but there’s since been a DVD. It’s a full-sized three ring routine that is simply astonishing and logical. He’s fooled thousands with it under tough conditions.
Pete Biro
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One of my favorite's is Al Koran's three-ring routinwe.
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Dick Oslund
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About 1975, my friend, and fellow member of the SECRET SIX, the late Karrell Fox, gave me his 3 ring routine. I had developed a 5 ring routine which I had used for several years, but, Karrell's uses 2 less rings, and, had a finish that I liked better than mine. I've used it, now, for about 40 years, and, I'm very pleased with it. The audience likes it, too!

If I hadn't known Karrell, I would most likely have learned Pop Haydn's! (The late Hersy Basham, gave me Pop's HAND WRITTEN ROUTINE, which Pop had developed in Hersy's living room.)
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John Long
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Vanishing Inc has a special on Capehart's(sp) ring routine. I doesn't look like it is encyclopedic wrt moves, but it looks like a good routine to consider.

https://www.vanishingincmagic.com/magic/......toplay=1
Rook
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On Jan 23, 2018, John Long wrote:
Vanishing Inc has a special on Capehart's(sp) ring routine. I doesn't look like it is encyclopedic wrt moves, but it looks like a good routine to consider.

https://www.vanishingincmagic.com/magic/......toplay=1


Indeed, you don't need a gazillion moves to put together a very good routine. Chris' routine is very direct, easy to follow, and his teaching provides some very good insights for the beginner. Chris' routine and Pop's routine are my favorites.
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B.W. McCarron
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John Booth's classic routine is another to consider. See Chapter Five of "Marvels of Mystery."
Pete Biro
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Juist start playing with them to gain comfort and confidence with handling the rings
STAY TOONED... @ www.pete-biro.com
Frank Simpson
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Another excellent resource is Levent's Ultimate Guide to The Linking Rings. It's a 4 DVD set(!) that is extremely comprehensive.

Levent is a great teacher, and he makes things easy to follow which is not an easy task with the rings.

Even though I have been firmly entrenched in Vernon's Symphony of the Rings for well over thirty years, I loved learning about the many other routines that he covers. I highly recommend this DVD series especially from the standpoint of exploring the possibilites for stage presentation.
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