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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » Hints on memorizing movement sequences (10 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Dick Oslund
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This is an 18 month old thread(!) which, somehow I have "missed" commenting on!!

Reading down the thread, I've noted some excellent suggestions, and the OP has responded numerous times, which tells me that she definitely wants ideas.

Pat Woolery has contributed some, IMO, very practical ideas. Well, everyone who responded has!

About 60 years ago, I stopped to see my old friend, now, the late Gene Gordon, one of the founders of the IBM. Gene had a magic shop in the Niagara Falls area or New York. It was just a friendly visit, but Gene showed me a fairly NEW trick! (THE PROFESSOR'S NIGHTMARE!) It was "my kind" of trick. The EFFECT fit my criteria. (I nearly tore my underwear, getting out my wallet, when Gene said, "One dollar." (and, THAT included three pieces of rope!)

I drove back to Michigan on "the Queens Highway" (Canada) thinking about a PRESENTATION! A few weeks later, I had time to grab the ropes (that were INCLUDED!). I was not thrilled with the set up moves, but the EFFECT was worth some effort. The original moves reminded me of the Edward Victor "trip" move for his cut & restored rope. I hadn't read Leon Maguire's "changing of the moment" misdirection" in Jean Hugard's Monthly Magazine, at that time. (See my "notes on the C&R rope in my book.)

Victor's move was done while the spectator's eyes were staring at the "critical spot"! I put the ropes with several "things to work on". Periodically, I would drag out the three ropes (that Gene had INCLUDED!) and, spend an hour with them. I just couldn't find a "better way" to do the set up.

About ELEVEN or TWELVE YEARS LATER, Karrell Fox and I were having a session. He showed me how he had "borrowed" Gen. Grant's "move" for Grant's "PERFECT C&R ROPE" (which our mutual friend, Doug Henning had used to open his first TV SPECIAL). E U R E K A !! Bob Carver's contribution to ROPE "MAGIC" has been in my working act since!

Grant's "PERFECT C&R ROPE" was first published in 1938, when Gen, was still in New York! For those interested, it was republished in Abbott's "NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF ROPE TRICKS", the 2005 printing. Just apply Gen's technique for "getting" the two interlocked bights in the shortest and longest ropes.

I wrote this, simply to add the thought that sometimes, it's easier to use a technique from a trick that one already knows!
SNEAKY, UNDERHANDED, DEVIOUS,& SURREPTITIOUS ITINERANT MOUNTEBANK
Wravyn
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Quote:
On Jan 31, 2018, WitchDocChris wrote:
Personally I tend to associate movements with script moments.

As I say X, I am doing Y. Eventually, saying X triggers an urge to do Y.

Yes, associating your spoken script with the physical movements will help.
Also, breaking down the trick into phases and working from phase one on through. Practice phase one for about 15 minutes and stop. Go do something else, grab a drink, go to the bathroom, put in a load of laundry... something to take you away for a few moments. Come back to you practice session and run through phase one... if you have phase one down, add phase two and run through phase one and phase two for about 15 minutes, take a break... when you return, do phase one and phase two, if no problems, add phase three... I hope you can see how this is going. It works for me and it also helps me get my verbal scripting memorized too.
incanes
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Without being a professional magician here is what I do when memorizing sequences. It is slow process and one has to be patient but it is worth it.

Basically I do it like the musicians practice.

1. Split the trick into parts;
2. Pick the first part: focus and practice it very slow until you can do it perfectly.
3. Speed up gradually until you can do it at "performance" speed.
4. Pick part two, practice slow. Practice until you can do it at performance speed.
5. Practice part one and two together!

And so on until the trick is fully memorized and becomes part of your muscle memory.

Then practice until the moves become "muscle" memory. Then you don't have to think about them and you.

Few hints:
* Don't go to a new part before you can do the previous one perfectly and in performance speed;
* Always focus on what you do on 100%. Otherwise it won't work.
* Go sequentially;
andrea.corelli
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Quote:
On May 28, 2019, Dick Oslund wrote:
This is an 18 month old thread(!) which, somehow I have "missed" commenting on!!

Reading down the thread, I've noted some excellent suggestions, and the OP has responded numerous times, which tells me that she definitely wants ideas.

Pat Woolery has contributed some, IMO, very practical ideas. Well, everyone who responded has!

[...]

I wrote this, simply to add the thought that sometimes, it's easier to use a technique from a trick that one already knows!


Thank you Dick. Your contribution is pretty much appreciated too. Just one point: the OP is a he ;-).
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Dick Oslund
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OOOH! Sorry! In English, Andrea is a girl's name! Andrew is the masculine form!

I had six years of Latin in college! In my philosophy classes, the lectures were in Latin!

"Auf wiedersehen"!
SNEAKY, UNDERHANDED, DEVIOUS,& SURREPTITIOUS ITINERANT MOUNTEBANK
FlightRisk
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Fun thread! Great input. I will offer a few things that helped me:

1. Learn the way actors do or director's do for shooting a script, especially for something short like a commercial. There are many resources you can find for how actors can memorize lines. I'll leave you to find those if interested.

As a director, I would use "shot list" or "storyboard", so I adapted that to magic. Mine is simple; 2 columns with three or 4 squares vertically in both columns. The left column has the action "display cards and do an Elmsley count" (I might draw or glue a picture in there too). The right column and matching square has the "dialogue" or "patter" in our case that goes with that step of the trick. "Now you can see that these three cards are difficult to make behave...". Write in your own hand (do not type it). Just some brain science there. It is visual, it reinforces your memory. Then practice the script with your moves at the same time using your sheet (kinesthetic learning). Put it in a binder and all your routines are there for posterity.

2. You can also use memory techniques like those taught by Harry Lorayne. They are indispensable to me for memorizing things and he has a complete card memorizing system in more than one of his books. If you are ever going to use a stacked deck, "mnemonics" (memory aids) are the way to go. Yes, you have to learn a system, but that system then can work not just in magic but all areas of your life. For example, you can make a mental image associating numbers in a sequence to things you are doing like 1. false shuffle, 2. fan the cards 3. force a card. You could have an image of shuffling HUGE cards, then fanning the spectator and blowing their hair all over the place, then force feeding them a card and ramming it into their mouth. Or you could create a rhyme. I even did a trick where I sing-songed the rhyme because it wound up working to tell a story with the trick! But you can just recite it silently in your mind while you learn how to remember the moves, "count four as three and put the odd on top, then show the bottom and do a slide pop..."

I'm sure with all this help, you will find a method that works for you. The bottom line is that once you practice the moves with the patter, they mutually reinforce themselves and you don't need the memory aids except as a backup.
Jed Maxwell
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I have a terrible memory and sought out a method to aid in memorizing scripts and directions. What I do now is write out the routine as a script with written directions. I then follow the method in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jbe1-oHnR6k

You can use this website to aid in the abridging of each word: http://memorizer.me/
"You're a mentalist!"
andrea.corelli
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Well, I won't add anything to the thread with this post, but I wanted to thank so much everybody contributing here. I think we managed to put together many different interesting inputs, at least for me. And I am going to try all of them one by one to see which one (or which combination of ones) fits best my need. Awesome job all!
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