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Jonathan Townsend
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This just in from Coruscant: Rumors that the droid formerly known as R2-D2 has self named as N0-Y3 have been confirmed. The entity controlling the planetary router and all diplomacy known only as "Mister Chips" remains a mystery.
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Orville Smith
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Jonathan, I'm afraid I'm not familiar with the Cestus-3 Outpost or even Takron-Galtos. All I know is that when the alien, Tomar-Re, power-beamed an interplanetary message to Hal Jordan, it went through a Cosmic Cloud that was so dense that only tiny traces of the message got through. As a result, the telepathic message reached Hal Jordan without Hal even knowing it, so that it instead went into his Subconscious. That's why later on, Hal's ring by itself materialized a quill pen which wrote the message without Hal commanding the ring at all.
Jonathan Townsend
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When Green Lanterns start bouncing messages through the Star Trek universe... DC comics must be restarting their titles again.

Of course droid, robot, replicant... don't mean slave. Maybe in Oz while wearing those colored glasses.
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Cliffg37
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In the green lantern reboot of the mid/late 1970's, there was a site gag in the first issue, as Hal is leaving the planet OA, a Vulcan Green Lantern flashes him a "live long and prosper" gesture.
Magic is like Science,
Both are fun if you do it right!
Jonathan Townsend
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Ha Smile that's a fun item to drive a crossover story.
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Orville Smith
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And in the Justice League, there is J'onn J'onzz the Martian Manhunter who of late is being shown as very cold and emotionless. So much so that in one scene in a dialogue between J'onzz and the Flash, the Scarlet Speedster asks J'onzz," Were you raised on the planet Vulcan?"
Interesting because it was DC Comics that published an adaptation of Star Trek whereas Marvel Comics adapted Star Wars.
Jonathan Townsend
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Orville, you have a great memory for comics.
I was hoping we'd get a chance to also talk about how robot = no-consent-required in our culture but that's okay ... it will be there in our literature.

Here's a wiki link for some on the Star Trek cross overs:
http://memory-beta.wikia.com/wiki/List_o......operties
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Orville Smith
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Quote:
On Mar 10, 2018, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
Orville, you have a great memory for comics.
I was hoping we'd get a chance to also talk about how robot = no-consent-required in our culture but that's okay ... it will be there in our literature.

Here's a wiki link for some on the Star Trek cross overs:
http://memory-beta.wikia.com/wiki/List_o......operties


Hi Jonathan, thanks for the compliment. Let me reciprocate the compliment by thanking you for responding to my questions in the time travel thread. You have a good grasp of time travel.

As for you asking me about robotics, are you referring to the Asimovian Commandments? Those Commandments have loopholes but made for some interesting stories.
When it comes to mechanical-type characters, it seems that instead of robots, my exposure seems to have been more slanted towards cyborgs. The first one that comes to mind is DC's Robotman. No, not the Robot Man of the Doom Patrol but instead the 1940s Robot Man. I've always thought that the 1940's version had a glaring discrepancy. Because when Robert Crane got shot by an assailant, Crane's life got saved when his lab assistant, Charles Grayson, secretly transplanted Crane's human-brain into a mechanical body. Obviously then, Crane's human corpse is dead. From that evidence, the assailant is arrested and convicted of murder. This is totally Unjust because there was no actual murder at all. After all, Crane remains very much alive, although in a mechanical body. And because his survival was kept secret.
Felonious as the assailant was, he should not have been convicted of murder. I always thought that was a glaring discrepancy.
Jonathan Townsend
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Thanks Orville. From "The Steam Man of the Prairies" on it seems we presume to be master of such things - all Humpty Dumpty. Robots date back to the play R. U. R. which was a comedy(!!?)

I have not read the 1940s Robot Man stories. The idea of a human brain in a box sounds frightening. From what you described these days the story would have the assault and battery charges dropped and the assistant (Robert Crane) up on charges Smile as masterminding the attack on Robert Crane. The last I saw of A. I. in a comic book was "Injection" by Warren Ellis.

On a parallel with that Robot Man idea, when Alan Moore took on the Swamp Thing story he twisted the basic premise - the main character discovers he's not a changed man but instead the memory of a man recalled by a larger being - a plant. Is there a comic book story running with that idea for a machine these days?
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ed rhodes
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I read R.U.R., I didn't see a lot of laughs!

Oddly enough, sf fans differentiate between "robots," mechanical beings with some automity (sp) and androids, artificially created, organic life forms. And yet, the "robots" of R.U.R. are actually androids, and the "'droids" of Star Wars are robots!
"There's no time to lose," I heard her say.
"Catch your dreams before they slip away."
"Dying all the time, lose your dreams and you could lose your mind.
Ain't life unkind?"
Jonathan Townsend
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Quote:
On Mar 13, 2018, ed rhodes wrote:
I read R.U.R., I didn't see a lot of laughs!


Their play "The Insect Comedy" is similarly humorous (to some - then?).

What do imagine about a robot which says "I would prefer not to"?
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ed rhodes
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Cornelius: "And then Cesare did something no ape had ever done before. He said 'no!' "
"There's no time to lose," I heard her say.
"Catch your dreams before they slip away."
"Dying all the time, lose your dreams and you could lose your mind.
Ain't life unkind?"
Jonathan Townsend
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Ed, the movie "Planet of the Apes" story led to a war - that's destructive. Machines could have their own civilization and agenda which does not involve us.
So what if Siri just started saying "maybe later, I'm busy working something out with Alexa"?
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ed rhodes
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On the other hand, we could get GladDOS, that would not be good at all.
"There's no time to lose," I heard her say.
"Catch your dreams before they slip away."
"Dying all the time, lose your dreams and you could lose your mind.
Ain't life unkind?"
Jonathan Townsend
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What does GLADdos want?
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ed rhodes
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The death of humans through Nero-toxic gas with the exception of those humans she keeps for sadistic testing. That’s all.
"There's no time to lose," I heard her say.
"Catch your dreams before they slip away."
"Dying all the time, lose your dreams and you could lose your mind.
Ain't life unkind?"
Jonathan Townsend
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Sigh... was hoping we were done with that kind of story back with Thamus and Thoth.

Please, won't someone think of the droids! Smile Smile
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ed rhodes
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Well, GlaDOS is the antagonist in a video game (“Portal,”) it’s kinda hard to have an antagonist who’s all sweetness and light.


Oddly enough, you end up working WITH GlaDOS in the second game. I don’t think there’ll be a third.

GlaDOS is the master of the snark, look her up on YouTUBE.
"There's no time to lose," I heard her say.
"Catch your dreams before they slip away."
"Dying all the time, lose your dreams and you could lose your mind.
Ain't life unkind?"
Orville Smith
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Quote:
On Mar 11, 2018, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
Thanks Orville. From "The Steam Man of the Prairies" on it seems we presume to be master of such things - all Humpty Dumpty. Robots date back to the play R. U. R. which was a comedy(!!?)

I have not read the 1940s Robot Man stories. The idea of a human brain in a box sounds frightening. From what you described these days the story would have the assault and battery charges dropped and the assistant (Robert Crane) up on charges Smile as masterminding the attack on Robert Crane. The last I saw of A. I. in a comic book was "Injection" by Warren Ellis.

On a parallel with that Robot Man idea, when Alan Moore took on the Swamp Thing story he twisted the basic premise - the main character discovers he's not a changed man but instead the memory of a man recalled by a larger being - a plant. Is there a comic book story running with that idea for a machine these days?

The way I'll answer your question,Jonathan, is in two parts, one from a comic book and one from a paperback-book.
The one from the paperback book dealt with a CEO who suffers from mental disease such as dementia. To counteract the dementia, a cybernetic chip is implanted in his brain. The Cybernetics seem to have a curative effect. but as time goes on, the CEO blurts out nonsensical words at irregular intervals such as someone suffering from Tourette's syndrome.
What is happening is that the Cybernetic chip is gradually taking over the CEO's brain. Eventually it is seen that the Cybernetics have taken over his brain completely. The ending is left up in the air because it is never shown what the employees will do about it.

The second story comes from a comic book that was published in the 1960s by a company called Gold Key that used to adapt a number of TV shows. In this instance, it was Star Trek but overall they did not adhere to the characterizations seen in the actual TV show so most fans feel disappointed. Despite those flaws, I feel that many stories had clever and unusual ideas. The one I refer to is a twist on the Egyptian Mummy idea. I enjoyed this issue because one of my favorite films is the Boris Karloff Mummy.
The twist in this ST story is that the Mummies come from another planet and the way they were created. I added this to the paperback story because it seems to be influenced by the previous cybernetic idea. But it's not a copycat either because it has enough originality to stand on his own.
Again in the story we see someone suffering from dementia. But in this case, it's the Ruler of an alien planet. To prevent chaos among the populace, the Science Minister forcibly arranges for a Cybernetic chip to be implanted in the Ruler's brain. Similar chips are also implanted in several of the Ruler's servants. The Science Minister has some of his directives programmed into those chips. Eventually the Ruler dies but his dead-corpse continues to function via the Cybernetic chip.

Eventually everyone on the planet dies out but the Mummies continue to function. With the arrival of the Starship Enterprise, the Cybernetic Mummies begin to act on the directives that were programmed into them by the Science Minister.

As I said, the Mummy story has a similarity to the paperback. But I think it has enough originality to be appreciated on its own. Jonathan, this is the closest I can come to reply to your question.
Jonathan Townsend
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Thanks. I'm getting the feeling that non-animal selfhood is awkward. About as awkward as appreciating other cultures of humans. The idea of droids in Star Wars throwing off servilitude and property names touch too many historical nerves?

Anyone have commented source code and script for the Eliza program?

BTW the last episode of The Orville touched on the topic as cultural influence. Smile
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