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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Trick coin trickery » » Identifying Gaff Coin Amongst Normal Coins In Performance (2 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

tejinajoka
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I sometimes have a problem losing where the 'odd' coin is when performing or practice. For example if using a F#*##*r with 3 other coins, if they get mixed e.g. dropped on the table, handed out for inspection together, it is then I have the problem, Obviously odd dates might help but not in a matched set, I realise I could make a small dot with a Sharpie on the odd coin but wondered what other methods members may have suggestions on. Any thoughts or ideas I would be grateful for
If it's worth doing it's worth doing well. Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield (U.K.) in 1746
Chessmann
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Rule number 1 would be not to hand a f-----r coin out for examination! Smile

I would suggest routining things so you always know where the gaff is. Also, knowing the tiny details/imperfections and patina differences in each coin (or, just the gaff) so you can spot it easily.
My ex-cat was named "Muffin". "Vomit" would be a better name for her. AKA "The Evil Ball of Fur".
Matthew Crabtree
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I make sure that the gaff is the only coin in that set that has that date on it.
NicholasD
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IMO, the black dot idea is probably the best. Will Fern uses it, if it's good enough for him...
videoman
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Typically there are very tiny differences in patina, wear, condition, etc. that it's easy to determine when you know what to look for.
I've never had a set (either from Lassen or anyone else for that matter) that were absolutely identical in every way.

But then again, I only use Morgan's and Walking Liberties so I realize differences in clad Kennedy halves can be harder to see.
Maybe a tiny nick or scratch similar to a thumbnail impression on a card would work.
Matthew Crabtree
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Quote:
On May 24, 2018, videoman wrote:
Typically there are very tiny differences in patina, wear, condition, etc. that it's easy to determine when you know what to look for.
I've never had a set (either from Lassen or anyone else for that matter) that were absolutely identical in every way.

But then again, I only use Morgan's and Walking Liberties so I realize differences in clad Kennedy halves can be harder to see.
Maybe a tiny nick or scratch similar to a thumbnail impression on a card would work.


That is why I use the dates. Easy to look down and see the only 1991 or 2015 or what ever it happens to be in the group. No need to make it hard.
tejinajoka
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CHESMANN wrote
Quote:
Rule number 1 would be not to hand a f-----r coin out for examination!


Thank you for your reply, however, Eric Jones on his DVD 'An Extension of Me' does suggest to hand out to spectators. I guess it is a matter of style.
If it's worth doing it's worth doing well. Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield (U.K.) in 1746
StarManager
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My rule is don't lose track of the gaff.
"I'm a professional magician and once in a while I even work." Jonathan Todd Excelsior (StarManager)
inigmntoya
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Quote:
On May 27, 2018, tejinajoka wrote:
Thank you for your reply, however, Eric Jones on his DVD 'An Extension of Me' does suggest to hand out to spectators. I guess it is a matter of style.


As does Craig Petty (ref: Flipped Out DVD). Unless your spectator is a coin collector*, they're not going to hold it in a way that will allow the flipper to open.

*Coin collectors always pick up / hold coins by their edges (or use gloves) to avoid getting fingerprints on them.

[EDIT]
Hand them a normal coin first and see how they hold it. Smile
Matthew Crabtree
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Quote:
On May 28, 2018, inigmntoya wrote:
Quote:
On May 27, 2018, tejinajoka wrote:
Thank you for your reply, however, Eric Jones on his DVD 'An Extension of Me' does suggest to hand out to spectators. I guess it is a matter of style.


As does Craig Petty (ref: Flipped Out DVD). Unless your spectator is a coin collector*, they're not going to hold it in a way that will allow the flipper to open.

*Coin collectors always pick up / hold coins by their edges (or use gloves) to avoid getting fingerprints on them.

[EDIT]
Hand them a normal coin first and see how they hold it. Smile


Funny thing is Eric and Craid uses two complete different style ones as well.
MeetMagicMike
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That's what I like about Tango's TUC coin. It looks exactly like the real coins but you can always find it by feel. No need to worry about pocket management. Just put them in your pocket or coin purse and you are ready to go.
Magic Mike

MeetMagicMike.com



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