The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » What next in my education? (7 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

TeddyBoy
View Profile
Veteran user
New York, NY
304 Posts

Profile of TeddyBoy
I am just about to finish volume 3 of Card College, but have decided to put volume 4 aside for now. I think it is time to be exposed to other aspects of card magic and I wanted to hear members' opinions of where to go next.

My choices are between a more theoretical, performance-oriented book such as Strong Magic or Designing Miracles by Darwin Ortiz, or a book focusing on the works of various conjurers: e.g., Harry Lorayne, Bro. John Hamman, Darwin Ortiz (At the Card Table; Cardshark),Larry Jennings, Derek Dingle, John Carney, or Nick Trost. I am sort of lost and need some direction. I also have story boards of about 35-40 tricks, so selecting the best ones and "perfecting" them is also part of my next phase.

I'd love to hear your opinion, and if possible, your reason for your choice.
So many sleights...so little time.
Cheers,

Ted
mlippo
View Profile
Inner circle
Trieste (Italy)
1023 Posts

Profile of mlippo
Well, if you already have 30-40 tricks in your mind, choosing the best ones and keep on working on them, is choice #1.

Of course the hunger for new tricks and sleights (the Next Book Syndrome as Darwin Ortiz called it) because you always think that you still have to find the particular trick that'll make you a great magician, is always round the corner (I know it well ..) So I don't see why you shouldn't, at the same time, buy some books from various authors, to give yourself more choice and see tricks from different people rather than just Giobbi's eyes.

I don't see John Bannon in your above list. Maybe that would be my advice. Something usually not too demanding technically, but very good. I'm referring both to his new and his older publications.

And be hard on yourself and your list. Eliminate the tricks which are weaker, which do not get good reactions, which you will probably hardly have to chance to do (due to complicated set-ups, gimmicks you don't wish to carry on you all the time, performing conditions etc.). I started doing it one day and I can assure many tricks and packet tricks went (literally sometimes) in the rubbish, but leaving me with a slimmer AND better repertoire.

Mark
TeddyBoy
View Profile
Veteran user
New York, NY
304 Posts

Profile of TeddyBoy
Thank you Mark. I will take your advice and try to hone my collection of tricks. As for books, I already have books by those authors listed in my post AND have not yet read them!! So, getting another book, even by one of the greats like John Bannon is not in my plans. Frankly, I am so overwhelmed as to which direction to go in I actually feel like just giving up...but then I find my way back. It's very frustrating, maybe I just need to put the cards down for a while.
So many sleights...so little time.
Cheers,

Ted
danaruns
View Profile
Special user
The City of Angels
805 Posts

Profile of danaruns
What do you think about the notion of taking a different tack for a while, and rather than working on book magic, do a change-up and focus on putting an act together and performing it for formal audiences? It's a different mindset, and I know the hunger for learning more and more tricks is strong, but putting it all together in a coherent show can really make all your magic rocket into space. Just a thought.
"Dana Douglas is the greatest magician alive. Plus, I'm drunk." -- Foster Brooks
mlippo
View Profile
Inner circle
Trieste (Italy)
1023 Posts

Profile of mlippo
Quote:
On Jun 20, 2019, danaruns wrote:
What do you think about the notion of taking a different tack for a while, and rather than working on book magic, do a change-up and focus on putting an act together and performing it for formal audiences? It's a different mindset, and I know the hunger for learning more and more tricks is strong, but putting it all together in a coherent show can really make all your magic rocket into space. Just a thought.



And this is another priceless advice, TeddyBoy!
Your next step should also be stop thinking about tricks as a separate entity and start thinking in terms of routines. So try and choose your best and favourite tricks and think of how you could put them in a sequence, that has an overall theme and that build up from a first good and interesting effect to a great finale of routine/act.

As danaruns said, this is a completely different way of thinking your repertoire and one you should aim to.
As you have gone through Card College 2, you should've read - more than once I'm sure - the 100+ invaluable theory pages at the end of it.

And I would suggest you, if you have the chance, the following books on magic theory, in case you don't have them:

Strong Magic & Designing Miracles by Darwin Ortiz (out of print I'm afraid)
Scripting Magic by Peter McCabe
Maximum Entertainment by Ken Weber

Mark
Quchoul
View Profile
New user
6 Posts

Profile of Quchoul
For me works movies, books, educational lectures on YouTube. But now I have some kind of creative crisis. In a week I have to speak at a business school with a match. On the topic of business, where to start, what difficulties await novice businessmen and I can not write a good speech. Everything I write I don't like. I was already thinking about buy speeches online. Found one Australian service https://au.edubirdie.com/assignment-help. But on the other hand I want to share my experience. But I think if I buy speech, it would be unfair to those who come to listen to me. Difficult situation.
Harry Lorayne
View Profile
V.I.P.
New York City
8394 Posts

Profile of Harry Lorayne
Perhaps this post from somewhere else here at the Café may help:

"In 1978 (aged 14) my Christmas present was The Magic Book by Harry Lorayne. Maybe hard for teenagers these days to believe but back then, there were families who did not have a lot of money; and apart from a few sweets (candy) a book would potentially be your main present.

When I started reading Harry's The Magic Book, I felt as if I'd been transported to a parallel universe; whereby superb close-up magic, with every-day items, was indeed possible.

As I type this post sat at my kitchen table, there are 2 books in front of me - may the Lord strike me dead on the spot if I'm lying. Harry's 'The Magic Book' and Quantum Leaps (I was cross referencing something last night). I'm looking at The Magic Book as I type. It's battered and bruised - having been regularly read. More than any other magic book that I own, there's bits of torn cigarette packets with notes written on, sticking out of it. The odd torn playing card with other references scribbled. And of course, the more recent post-it note.

The fact is this book has been my inspiration in magic for nearly 40 years. I have used literally everything within. Despite, like many of us in our adult lives, having wasted a lot of money over the years on the latest magic 'flim flam' it IS the material within this book that I return to time and time again. Because one thing I have learnt about how magic is perceived by an audience is that you earn the greatest respect by performing with borrowed, or 'normal' items. For example, there is hardly anything within the card section that cannot be performed with a beat-up, borrowed pack of cards. Nothing within the coin section that needs expensive gaffs (in order to produce a similar effect in the eyes of spectators). Where else can you get so much workable material with a piece of paper & a pencil? A handkerchief, table items, etc.

What's more, it taught me the most important elements of magical entertainment - presentation, routining and misdirection.

It also taught me a very, very important lesson. That it is the basic, clearly defined easy to follow plot that gets the best reaction.

Over the years, I've spent time and money learning different versions of 'The Colour Changing Deck'; or buying gaffs to get Aces to transpose, etc. I've spent money on further gaffs to get coins to go through a table; or pass from hand to hand. I've bought (and sold on) these gimmicks and flim-flam; along with countless others that achive matrix-style routines, etc. The reason being that all most gimmicks do is over-prove what you don't need to be over-proving anyway.

The classics of magic will live forever; because they have an easy to follow plot. When you use ungaffed or borrowed items and throw them into the mix, it's just so much more rewarding. Added to which 'less is more'. If you can go out with minimal props, you will generally work harder on your presentation - because you are building upon the basics - by actually using the basics. Does that make sense? I hope it does. In other words, you tend to put more energy into your performance. A prop isn't doing the work for you. I've worked with other magicians that rush at break-neck speed from prop to prop; akin to a magic dealer demo (only to then vanish to re-set their gimmicks). However, arrive at a table; borrow a few contrasting coins and a table napkin, and you are ready to entertain. And what I can genuinely say to guys (still reading my rambling here) is that people aren't stupid. If they can see you are working AND entertaining them with what are clearly not 'magic props' you will get one hell of a lot of respect.....and in many cases, you will stand out.

Harry (I believe) wrote this book for people who had an interest in starting out performing magic. It has the clearest of instruction; and covers so many useful principles of magic.

I would not only unreservedly recommend this book to people starting out; but also to any magician that wants to make a living as a professional, magical entertainer.

Indeed, it's title of 'THE Magic Book' could not be more deserving.

It is, in my honest opinion, the GREATEST book of magic ever produced.

Words cannot express my most sincere gratitude and thanks, to the Master himself.......Mr Harry Lorayne."

Barry Allen (Merc Man)

[email]harrylorayne@earthlink.net[/e


http://www.harryloraynemagic.com
[email]harrylorayne@earthlink.net[/email]

http://www.harrylorayne.com
http://www.harryloraynemagic.com
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » What next in my education? (7 Likes)
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2020 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.17 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL