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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » 10 Great Tricks for an aspiring 10 year old magician (2 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

robo2084
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I no longer perform magic but I still love the craft. When I was 8-12 it was my obsession; now I'm just a Magic Castle member and I still read up on new effects sometimes.

I was pleased to see that my young cousin, who just turned 10, has acquired an affinity for magic and I wanted to offer him a few ideas.

There are many, many great beginner books listed in this forum, but I seek something different and perhaps more specific: a handful of simply great tricks that are "world class" but could be handled by a smart ten year old.

So, on my list so far are effects like "Out of this World" and "Invisible Deck". Maybe later on with some dexterity, "Triumph" and McDonald's Aces. What else would be on your top 10 list? (Ideally I'd like to learn the tricks and teach him. And only tricks that truly stand on their own and have the potential to produce a "wow".)

Thanks everyone.
funsway
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The shoelace tie with an extra knot flicked into the audience when the knot dissolves.

thumb tip blendo (depending on hand size)

Grant Ropes - great getting other kids involved but requires no skill.

Birds of a Feather (Tarbell) - can use many objects and the sleights are masked. Teaches timing and eye contact control too.

tying a knot in a rope without letting go of the ends.

Afghan Bands
"the more one pretends at magic, the more awe and wonder will be found in real life." Arnold Furst



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robo2084
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Thanks! I was trying to find a reference for grant ropes. Any routine in particular?
Ronin
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When I was a kid, tricks where the apparatus could be examined were gold, since I knew my friends would want to shuffle the deck or open the box themselves. Professor’s Nightmare was a standard for me, along with Out Of This World.

So much will depend on what kind of kid your cousin is. Will he want to work sleights? Or will the glitter of apparatus draw him in? Spiked coin and Color Monte were trusted standbys for me back then. Paddle tricks and sponge balls were early sleight of hand standards for me.

I think it’s more important to find stuff that’s **fun** for your cousin to practice and perform. So many adult amateurs don’t want to put in the time to learn sleights, yet still have fun with magic as a hobby. If your cousin takes to some tricks and has a passion for performing magic, plenty of time to introduce structure and fundamentals after the passion kicks in. I really do think fundamentals are important for magic long term and love sleight of hand and scripting, but I wouldn’t necessarily push a ten-year-old into it right off.
David Hirata
www.thingsimpossible.com


"Life is a combination of magic and pasta."
--Federico Fellini
funsway
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Quote:
On Aug 30, 2020, robo2084 wrote:
Thanks! I was trying to find a reference for grant ropes. Any routine in particular?


EFFECT: Two volunteers come on stage. One is handed two ropes of equal length knotted together in the center to keep them from getting mixed up. The other kid is given two ropes of unequal length, knotted together to keep them from mixing with the ‘proper’ ones. Each kid is identified with the qualities of the nature of the ropes he/she holds. They place the ropes behind their backs and untie the knots – having a race if appropriate – but not showing the ropes, just shouting “Done.” Then Mr. Unequal is asked to display his ropes – they are equal in length. Mr. Equal shows his and is surprised to discover they are unequal in length. Each is given a long, equal rope as a memento. You now do another effect with each of the remaining pieces, one long and one shorter, but each capable of magic. (I did C/R with the long and Ring on rope with the shorter)

PM me for explanation if you can't figure it out.
"the more one pretends at magic, the more awe and wonder will be found in real life." Arnold Furst



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Boomer
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'now I'm just a Magic Castle member '

You gave me a good laugh. Why? Isn't it obvious, I'm jealous.

Glad to hear young people are interested in magic, and not just video games.


Dave
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The ten self-working tricks in this article are all of the highest class, and some of them would make ideal candidates for teaching an aspiring 10 year old magician:

10 of the Best Self-Working Card Tricks in the World

Just because they are `self-working' doesn't mean they are mathematical atrocities, because these are some of the finest card tricks in magic. Take Paul Curry's brilliant "Out of This World", for example - a case can be made that it's the greatest card trick ever, despite being a self-worker.

And naturally they all need good showmanship and presentation, since not trick works completely automatically. But with good presentation, a ten year old can certainly amaze with tricks like these.
funsway
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At that age, he and his friends can be excited about learning "other right answer" and weird science, even if not actually magic tricks.

For example, hand out a 6-8' length of 1X2 wood, or 3/4" PVC or similar (rod). Have them try and find the center without a measuring tool. Some will try innovative "on the fly" measuring deviced.

They you (the wizard) demonstrates the simple solution. Toss up and catch rod across your extended finger about 3' apart. The rod will extend out on both sides.
Rotate your hands os the the rod sits on the edges of your fingers with palms facing each other. Slowly bring your hands together until the palms touch.
The rod will be perfectly balance at its exact center! Looks like magic. The interaction of gravity and friction will cause the rod to tip and slide to seek the balance.
Thus, the bringing together will not be as smooth action. Instead the rod seems to jerk and jump in a strange dance.

Strangely, even experienced handymen do not know this "trick" and waste time hunting for a tape measure.
"the more one pretends at magic, the more awe and wonder will be found in real life." Arnold Furst



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vannma
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If he could learn a few slights with sponge balls, then he could perform impromptu anywhere any time. Also cups and balls are good for beginners. When I was that age I really enjoyed the Svengali Deck, Stripper Deck, Finger Chopper and tricks with a thumb tip.
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