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Steve Suss
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Zen Master and some variations
jeebs9
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Juan Tam
Mnemonicosis Mind blower! It's the reason I got into stacks in the first place.

Asi Wind
3 Transportation (aka Biddle trick I love this trick!)
Out of the Blue (or red) I always like to start with this trick.
AACAAN (I love this trick so much. But I can't perform it. I suck at math while talking. I've tried everything. The only way I'm able to do it.Is by looking at a cheat sheet in the deck.)
Waterloophai
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Quote:
On Dec 17, 2014, jeebs9 wrote:
AACAAN (I love this trick so much. But I can't perform it. I suck at math while talking. I've tried everything. The only way I'm able to do it.Is by looking at a cheat sheet in the deck.)

PM me. I have not THE solution for you but at least something that can help a liitle bit. (maybe Smile )
J-L Sparrow
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I've only performed it a few times, but I'm quite fond of "The Humming Speller" found in Martin Joyal's "The Six-Hour Memorized Deck".

The effect is this: A spectator riffle-shuffles the deck and cuts it into three packs. The magician looks through them, tries to determine which card the spectator will pick (before the spectator chooses a card), then instructs the spectator(s) to shuffle all the packs. The main spectator then chooses a card from one of the piles. The magician then assembles the three packs into a whole deck, and after reminding the spectators of their freedom of choice, names the chosen card. And as a bonus, the magician deals out one card for every letter in the spectator's name to reveal the chosen card.

What's impressive about this trick is that the spectator's choice is not forced.
chado158
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Quote:
On Dec 22, 2014, J-L Sparrow wrote:
I've only performed it a few times, but I'm quite fond of "The Humming Speller" found in Martin Joyal's "The Six-Hour Memorized Deck".

The effect is this: A spectator riffle-shuffles the deck and cuts it into three packs. The magician looks through them, tries to determine which card the spectator will pick (before the spectator chooses a card), then instructs the spectator(s) to shuffle all the packs. The main spectator then chooses a card from one of the piles. The magician then assembles the three packs into a whole deck, and after reminding the spectators of their freedom of choice, names the chosen card. And as a bonus, the magician deals out one card for every letter in the spectator's name to reveal the chosen card.

What's impressive about this trick is that the spectator's choice is not forced.


that's very interesting. I am going to look into this one but don't have the book. is it stack dependent??
thanks for sharing this Smile
J-L Sparrow
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Quote:
On Dec 22, 2014, J-L Sparrow wrote:
I've only performed it a few times, but I'm quite fond of "The Humming Speller" found in Martin Joyal's "The Six-Hour Memorized Deck".

What's impressive about this trick is that the spectator's choice is not forced.


Quote:
On Dec 22, 2014, chado158 wrote:
that's very interesting. I am going to look into this one but don't have the book. is it stack dependent??
thanks for sharing this Smile


You're very welcome!

And no, it is not stack dependent, so it can be done with any memorized stack.

(In fact, I'm pretty sure every trick in Martin Joyal's "The Six-Hour Memorized Deck" is stack independent, as the Joyal stack wasn't created around specific tricks, but rather for ease of memorization. Not only that, but there are two versions of the Joyal stack: CHaSeD and SHoCkeD -- and every trick in that book should work with both versions. So if any trick in the book were to depend on one stack, there would be a risk of it not working with the other.)
Kjellstrom
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Martin Joyal's "The Six-Hour Memorized Deck":

http://www.joyalstack.com/memorized-deck......zed-deck (ebook)
JanForster
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Quote:
On Dec 22, 2014, J-L Sparrow wrote:
I've only performed it a few times, but I'm quite fond of "The Humming Speller" found in Martin Joyal's "The Six-Hour Memorized Deck".

The effect is this: A spectator riffle-shuffles the deck and cuts it into three packs. The magician looks through them, tries to determine which card the spectator will pick (before the spectator chooses a card), then instructs the spectator(s) to shuffle all the packs. The main spectator then chooses a card from one of the piles. The magician then assembles the three packs into a whole deck, and after reminding the spectators of their freedom of choice, names the chosen card. And as a bonus, the magician deals out one card for every letter in the spectator's name to reveal the chosen card.

What's impressive about this trick is that the spectator's choice is not forced.


It is a nice routine, but I still think that the mental gymnastics in it are not necessary, unless you want to fool other less knowledgeable magicians. You do not gain a lot if you let a spectator riffle shuffle the deck after you have divided it. If you do initially a full deck false shuffle and a false cut, let then the spectator cut the deck into three piles and let him then shuffle "again" each pile, you will have in recall the same strong conditions... All you have to do is to look for the card with the lowest stack number in the middle pile and adjust your handling accordingly.

Do not get me wrong, I am not against mental gymnastics or math, I do often and enjoy it, but here I feel it is simply not necessary. Jan
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J-L Sparrow
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Quote:
On Dec 23, 2014, JanForster wrote:
It is a nice routine, but I still think that the mental gymnastics in it are not necessary, unless you want to fool other less knowledgeable magicians. You do not gain a lot if you let a spectator riffle shuffle the deck after you have divided it. If you do initially a full deck false shuffle and a false cut, let then the spectator cut the deck into three piles and let him then shuffle "again" each pile, you will have in recall the same strong conditions... All you have to do is to look for the card with the lowest stack number in the middle pile and adjust your handling accordingly.


Good point. However, I thought a similar thing until the first time I practiced the trick. What I discovered was that, when performing the basic trick as presented in the book, doing the locations was considerably easier than I expected. (I'm intentionally keeping this part vague so as not to reveal too much.)

It turns out that one of the locations is quite easy, and the other is so simple you might not even consider it a real location. (Martin Joyal points this out using his own words, but I didn't realize what he was talking about until I encountered this property myself.) In fact, I'd even go so far as to say that these two locations (or one location, if you don't count the other) are easier than looking for the one card with the lowest stack number.

Now, the author does offer a variant that requires the magician to make a couple of more difficult locations. I'll admit that this variant definitely makes the mental gymnastics more difficult, but I've never felt the need to use it; the basic trick works just fine for me.

I will agree that, as far as the math is concerned, locating two cards will result in a little extra work -- but it's just adding two numbers together (and possibly in the "fudging" of the final amount). (Again, I'm being intentionally vague here.) So in the end, the trade-off of letting the spectator riffle-shuffle the deck is that you have an easier time locating the cards, at the cost of doing just a little extra math.

At least, that's the way I see it. Your mileage may vary, of course.
landmark
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In Greg Chapman's new book, The Devil's Staircase, he offers a number of great subtle suggestions to make memdeck effects such as the above one even more deceptive.
J-L Sparrow
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One trick I'm quite fond of that I've almost never seen or heard mentioned is Simon Aronson's "Group Shuffle" trick. It's the third trick in his Bound to Please book.

It's a fairly simple multiple card revelation trick. It's so simple, in fact, that when I was first reading the effect in Bound to Please, I thought there had to be some sort of secret move or sneaky sleight-of-hand, since it appeared that knowledge of a memdeck wouldn't be enough.

But I was wrong. It turns out a memorized deck is all you need. (It doesn't matter which one; the trick itself is stack-independent.)

Simon Aronson supplies patter that talks about how all sorts of things are better in groups; even objects like cards are better in groups. You don't have to use his patter, but I've discovered that you do have to use some patter -- otherwise your directions will feel quite arbitrary to the spectators. So if you don't use his patter, have some fun making up your own! (But be sure to perfect your patter before you perform the trick!)
lcwright1964
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Quote:
On Dec 26, 2014, J-L Sparrow wrote:
One trick I'm quite fond of that I've almost never seen or heard mentioned is Simon Aronson's "Group Shuffle" trick. It's the third trick in his Bound to Please book.


I love so many of Simon's impossible location effects using a memorized stack, but pretty well most of them have the order partially or fully destroyed by spectator shuffles, so they work best as stand-alone stunners, and may be avoided by those who want to keep things intact as much as possible.

My recent favourite is Topsy Turvy from Simply Simon. Memdeck savvy magicians might be able to follow it, but it should just stump laypeople. The entire deck gets shuffled extensively, and there is no math involved, but solid knowledge of a stack is a must. The performer is far ahead in that he or she knows the three selections long before anything magical even happens. Moreover, I have found that it works quite well even one just wants to handle one or two selections (by having the spectator making the three cuts yet choosing which packet(s) they wish to use), and one may actually control better with some modification of the method which selections end up being face up or face down in the spread come revelation time. One needn't go with the muscle reading plot either--I like spreading the cards before the spectator and telling them I am looking for a pupillary response Smile

I agree that Group Shuffle is a doozy and deceptively simple in its method. Also from Bound to Please we the awesome (though a little risky) No-Touch Location. I also really like S-D Plus, and find spectators enjoy it just fine, even though Simon attests it is probably more interesting as a puzzle for other magicians.

I still think that Past Present Future is just simply one of Simon's crowning achievements. I like doing the future card revelation as an ID selection (with appropriate patter about a dream and how I woke up an flipped the dreamt-of selection in a deck I had nearby). By doing the ID revelation with an ungimmicked deck using Mike Close's method, the spectator gets to handle the deck and remove the card himself and have his head explode when the flipped card matches the selection he freely made at the beginning of the trick Smile

Les
chappy
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I have to repeat some of the great routines already mentioned.

Twice as Hard from Try the Impossible is great.
Asi Wind's ACAAN is as clean and direct as it gets.

The routine I perform most often and that is the strongest effect I do with cards is Pure and Simple from The Devil's Staircase. The effect follows in the tradition of similar work by Juan Tamariz, Simon Aronson, Steve Ehlers and others.

Another effect I perform often is called One Card Missing. It's a direct quickie that keeps the stack alive and avoids some of the common "tells" of stack work.

Greg
FARO FUNDAMENTALS, DETAILS OF DECEPTION and THE DEVIL'S STAIRCASE at www.thedevilsstaircase.com
twistedace
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I'm very interested in the Humming Speller. Is it a 3 revelation routine? I saw something similar years ago and have been trying to find the routine. The routine I saw:

Magician hands out three packets of cards to be shuffled, spectators each remember one in their packet, the packets are reassembled into a deck, the magician spells to the first card, the spectator spells to the second, and the magician asks the third spectator to just think stop after he spells out the card in his head as the magician deals.

Is this Humming Speller?
JanForster
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No, it is one card. Jan
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lcwright1964
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I am surprised that Aronson's Four Part Harmony hasn't gotten a mention. I love how once one identifies any of the four selections one can compute the other three readily. Is it the on-the-feet math that puts people off?
The_MetalMaster
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Quote:
On Dec 31, 2014, lcwright1964 wrote:
I am surprised that Aronson's Four Part Harmony hasn't gotten a mention. I love how once one identifies any of the four selections one can compute the other three readily. Is it the on-the-feet math that puts people off?


I remember performing this once and the mental gymnastics wasnt as much of a problem as the 4 people switching places on me without me noticing! I would like to go back and have a look at 4PH now that I have performed quite a few shows since then. I'm sure my audience control has improved a bit!
JanForster
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Quote:
On Jan 1, 2015, lcwright1964 wrote:
I am surprised that Aronson's Four Part Harmony hasn't gotten a mention. I love how once one identifies any of the four selections one can compute the other three readily. Is it the on-the-feet math that puts people off?


I did several times, starting already more than four years ago: Smile
http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......89718#10

What I changed only was that I've eliminated the dealing by the spectators to get secret knowledge of "x" and "y" as I found it to time consuming. Jan
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JanForster
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After I few PMs I will explain it here:
I know that only people knowing 4PH will understand the following, but that’s o. k., isn’t it?

In order to speed up the process of secret counting I have to touch the cards briefly for a moment. Of course I want to make people forget that I touched the cards at all.

Once A got his packet (remembering the top card) and also C, I ask both to shuffle their packets. Talking about job sharing I ask A and C to give a part of their cards to B and D. Now four people are shuffling, nice picture. So far everything was totally "hands off".

Only then I tell them that each one has to know in which packet his THOUGHT OF card lies, but to keep absolutely poker face and silent... Therefore I take the small pile of A (approximately half of X) and spread the cards (faces to A an B) while I turn my head completely away (doing it "blind"). Immediately I hand A back his packet face down. I repeat with the second half of X (held by B) for A and B.
The same I do with C and D.

Of course, secretly and "blind" I count the cards (easy, each small packet may contain something like 6 to 8 cards). Important: I do a continuos count for the piles of A and B, and for the piles of C and D. That means: once I counted A, I continue to count up once I have the small pile of B in my hands. Same I do with C and D. Therefore I reach immediately X and Y without any need of further additions.

Once I have finished each one knows where his card is, and each one holds again a small pile in his hand. The secret counting is very quick! I ask each one again to shuffle his pile, helpful "smoke" to make forget I touched the cards briefly at all. Besides that it is a nice picture to see 4 people shuffling again their cards.

They keep their piles and now I can continue to read their minds following the original. The fact that the conditions of mind reading are getting increasingly more difficult or impossible I point out clearly as in the original. Jan
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