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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Shuffled not Stirred » » Favorite Memorized Deck Trick (42 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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lcwright1964
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Quote:
On Jan 2, 2015, JanForster wrote:
After I few PMs I will explain it here:
I know that only people knowing 4PH will understand the following, but that’s o. k., isn’t it?

In order to speed up the process of secret counting I have to touch the cards briefly for a moment. Of course I want to make people forget that I touched the cards at all.

Once A got his packet (remembering the top card) and also C, I ask both to shuffle their packets. Talking about job sharing I ask A and C to give a part of their cards to B and D. Now four people are shuffling, nice picture. So far everything was totally "hands off".

Only then I tell them that each one has to know in which packet his THOUGHT OF card lies, but to keep absolutely poker face and silent... Therefore I take the small pile of A (approximately half of X) and spread the cards (faces to A an B) while I turn my head completely away (doing it "blind"). Immediately I hand A back his packet face down. I repeat with the second half of X (held by B) for A and B.
The same I do with C and D.

Of course, secretly and "blind" I count the cards (easy, each small packet may contain something like 6 to 8 cards). Important: I do a continuos count for the piles of A and B, and for the piles of C and D. That means: once I counted A, I continue to count up once I have the small pile of B in my hands. Same I do with C and D. Therefore I reach immediately X and Y without any need of further additions.

Once I have finished each one knows where his card is, and each one holds again a small pile in his hand. The secret counting is very quick! I ask each one again to shuffle his pile, helpful "smoke" to make forget I touched the cards briefly at all. Besides that it is a nice picture to see 4 people shuffling again their cards.

They keep their piles and now I can continue to read their minds following the original. The fact that the conditions of mind reading are getting increasingly more difficult or impossible I point out clearly as in the original. Jan


I came up with something similar on my own, so I feel validated Smile

I think that in stack tricks and self workers anything that distances one from the mathematical underpinnings through too much dealing and counting (implied or aloud) is best. Unless of course counting is intrinsic to the mystery, as in ACAAN or Mnemonicosis. In Aronson's Simply Simon I actually prefer Two Wrongs Make It Right over Everybody's Lazy or Lazy Memory. The former involves dealing, yes, but explicit counting and numbers aren't mentioned, making the coincident climaxes more magical.

Les
J-L Sparrow
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Back in December of 2003 Nick Pudar posted a trick named "Fingertip Reading" in the Secret Sessions section of The Magic Café. It's a double-card location that I got pretty good reactions with.

Although it uses a marked deck in conjunction with it being a memorized deck, Nick included a way to do the trick without a marked deck. Since I didn't have a marked deck with me when I performed the trick, I performed the non-marked-deck version. However, Nick does recommend trying the trick with a marked deck for full effect.

It's an impressive trick, but I haven't performed it in a while. Looks like I'll have to practice and try it out again soon.
lcwright1964
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Quote:
On Jan 3, 2015, J-L Sparrow wrote:
Back in December of 2003 Nick Pudar posted a trick named "Fingertip Reading" in the Secret Sessions section of The Magic Café. It's a double-card location that I got pretty good reactions with.


A wonderful gift to the community!

I found it quickly using the Quicksearch field above, and have already exported the text to a PDF for close review.

Thanks for sharing.

Les
lcwright1964
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Quote:
On Jan 3, 2015, lcwright1964 wrote:
Quote:
On Jan 3, 2015, J-L Sparrow wrote:
Back in December of 2003 Nick Pudar posted a trick named "Fingertip Reading" in the Secret Sessions section of The Magic Café. It's a double-card location that I got pretty good reactions with.


A wonderful gift to the community!

I found it quickly using the Quicksearch field above, and have already exported the text to a PDF for close review.

Thanks for sharing.

Les


Just worked through it. It is basically Simon Aronson's Lazy Memory with a marked deck, though it is clear that Mr. Pudar worked it out independently of Simon's trick.
JanForster
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Still a very good routine. But I agree - as already stated - that the routine might gain if you do not tell the fist spectator his card but only the position of his card. You can then create easier a climax with the second spectator naming position and his card.

Besides that you wouldn't need a sh..r or m..ked deck if you proceed like that: Before you tell the fist spectator the position of his card show him how you want the card to be counted/dealt. Take the top card and deal this card face up onto table and immediately replace this card back on top of the deck Smile. Don't pay any attention to it, but you saw what you need to know... I know it is bold, but works. Jan
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lcwright1964
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Quote:
On Jan 4, 2015, JanForster wrote:
Still a very good routine. But I agree - as already stated - that the routine might gain if you do not tell the fist spectator his card but only the position of his card. You can then create easier a climax with the second spectator naming position and his card.

Besides that you wouldn't need a sh..r or m..ked deck if you proceed like that: Before you tell the fist spectator the position of his card show him how you want the card to be counted/dealt. Take the top card and deal this card face up onto table and immediately replace this card back on top of the deck Smile. Don't pay any attention to it, but you saw what you need to know... I know it is bold, but works. Jan


Jan, Aronson does indeed talk about this subtlety in Simply Simon. In Lazy Memory, as in the original Lazy Man's Card Trick, one flips the deck face up for cutting and this allows a glimpse of the bottom card and lets on compute the location of first selection. Learning the ID of the top card works too. Aronson suggests just flipping and asking the spectator if is card ended up on top. I like your approach better as it seems to ignore the value of the card.

I should point out that Pudar's effect differs from what Simon calls Doubly Lazy Memory by eliminating a third completed cut. This last cut must not be too deep as it must stay within the portion of the stack that remains unshuffled. But it DOES bring the first selection a bit closer to the top and may speed things up. And the math doesn't change one bit due to cyclicity.

Les
JanForster
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Yes. In this context the last cut is quite risky... Nevertheless, I find "Everybody's Lazy" still the strongest piece in this entire genre. A true gem with an excellent presentation theme, already provided by Simon.

What I always did was apparently showing a person next to me the last (my) card. This Person actually never sees the card, but it looks like. As I follow with briefly putting my forefinger on my mouth and with a short wink it looks very convincing and my "poor" spectator keeps silent without really knowing what is going on or was meant. For the rest it seems that he saw my card. When I finally name my card I point briefly to him and nod. Try it, it really works although I've to admit that you need b...ls to do it. As a mentalist I got meanwhile b..ls made of steel Smile. Jan
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Quote:
On Jan 4, 2015, JanForster wrote:
As a mentalist I got meanwhile b..ls made of steel Smile. Jan

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0cGxqYZp6M
(this is stack independent Smile )
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Smile Smile
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J-L Sparrow
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I've heard a lot of good things about Simon Aronson's The Invisible Card, so when I finally read Simon's book Try the Impossible this week, it was one of the first tricks I turned to.

I wasn't disappointed. It's fairly easy to do (provided you already know a memorized deck quite well), is stack-independent, doesn't destroy the stack, and packs a powerful and delightful punch. To the spectator, the effect is similar to the standard Invisible Deck trick, but to the magician, it's a completely different method.

And it's rewarding, too -- in that the better you know your memdeck, the easier (and more fun) it is to perform!
lcwright1964
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Quote:
On Jan 15, 2015, J-L Sparrow wrote:
I've heard a lot of good things about Simon Aronson's The Invisible Card, so when I finally read Simon's book Try the Impossible this week, it was one of the first tricks I turned to.

I wasn't disappointed. It's fairly easy to do (provided you already know a memorized deck quite well), is stack-independent, doesn't destroy the stack, and packs a powerful and delightful punch. To the spectator, the effect is similar to the standard Invisible Deck trick, but to the magician, it's a completely different method.

And it's rewarding, too -- in that the better you know your memdeck, the easier (and more fun) it is to perform!


It's the best! There is no math, and the one move is easy and invisible. I love it!
The_MetalMaster
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Quote:
On Jan 15, 2015, J-L Sparrow wrote:
I've heard a lot of good things about Simon Aronson's The Invisible Card, so when I finally read Simon's book Try the Impossible this week, it was one of the first tricks I turned to.

I wasn't disappointed. It's fairly easy to do (provided you already know a memorized deck quite well), is stack-independent, doesn't destroy the stack, and packs a powerful and delightful punch. To the spectator, the effect is similar to the standard Invisible Deck trick, but to the magician, it's a completely different method.

And it's rewarding, too -- in that the better you know your memdeck, the easier (and more fun) it is to perform!


I really need to start performing this more often. I always perform Head Over Heels which is almost the same effect. I like the fact it stays in stack and I can go into another mem deck effect immediately after.
Two Beginnings is always my go to card effect when ever anybody wants to see something. Its quick and straight to the point. Can't go wrong with it!
bartleby
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I am really more into bizarre magic and moving away from card tricks, but I wanted to learn a stack for some divination ideas. I got Mnemonica for Christmas and at first glance thought, this stuff is too difficult for a hack like me.

In time I went back and reviewed the non-faro tricks and the divination tricks and Mnemonicosis.

So I had a friend from work over to watch some fights and he agreed to sit in on some new experiments I was working on. We worked on Tarot and book tests and then had some beers and watched the fights. At one point in the evening my buddy says he was telling his seven year old daughter (whom I have not met) that he was going over to a magician's house (a great exaggeration). She asked for an update on his return.

I felt terrible. None of the effects we had played with were appropriate for an update to a seven year old girl. So when the fights ended I told him "let's do a card trick so you have something to tell your family".

A false shuffle and cut and Mnemonicosis. In my head it was ugly and unpolished - though my bizarre effects are always done the same way (Eg "I don't know if this will work").

The effect was astounding to me. He called out his dismay. He repeatedly said "you didn't touch the deck!". I have never had such a reaction from a trick.

A week later at work we were leaving a meeting and he leaned over and said "I still can't get the 9 of spades out of my head".

This stuff is way more powerful than I first considered.
lcwright1964
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Quote:
On Jan 17, 2015, bartleby wrote:
I am really more into bizarre magic and moving away from card tricks, but I wanted to learn a stack for some divination ideas. I got Mnemonica for Christmas and at first glance thought, this stuff is too difficult for a hack like me.

In time I went back and reviewed the non-faro tricks and the divination tricks and Mnemonicosis.

So I had a friend from work over to watch some fights and he agreed to sit in on some new experiments I was working on. We worked on Tarot and book tests and then had some beers and watched the fights. At one point in the evening my buddy says he was telling his seven year old daughter (whom I have not met) that he was going over to a magician's house (a great exaggeration). She asked for an update on his return.

I felt terrible. None of the effects we had played with were appropriate for an update to a seven year old girl. So when the fights ended I told him "let's do a card trick so you have something to tell your family".

A false shuffle and cut and Mnemonicosis. In my head it was ugly and unpolished - though my bizarre effects are always done the same way (Eg "I don't know if this will work").

The effect was astounding to me. He called out his dismay. He repeatedly said "you didn't touch the deck!". I have never had such a reaction from a trick.

A week later at work we were leaving a meeting and he leaned over and said "I still can't get the 9 of spades out of my head".

This stuff is way more powerful than I first considered.


Did your friend dead cut to the selection, or did he just get close and you went into improvising? I think it is awesome when the spec cuts right to it, and this apparently happens quite a bit if you give clear instructions. In Blaine's Real or Magic, Katy Perry named 8H (14), Blaine told her casually "to cut off about a quarter of the deck" and that is exactly what she did Smile
bartleby
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Alas he did not cut right to the selection - but I managed to muddle through
ambassador365
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I hesitate to mention it, but I love an effect in Thinking the Impossible by Ramon Rioboo's book called, "Super Telepathy for Skeptics". You have a spectator shuffle the deck and take out a small group of about 5 to 10 cards from the middle of the pack. You're able to name every card in their hand.
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I keep going back to Tamariz´s "Mnemonicosis". The spectator's reactions never cease to amaze me
robinr
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I've used it most often not for tricks per se, but as part of a lecture/workshop on Memory. I teach the audience an easy 10 item mnemonic and then show them how to use it to memorize a list of objects they name. Then I tell them that before the show I shuffled a deck, then wrote the numbers from 1 to 52 on the backs of the cards. I split the deck into 2 groups, hand to two folks in the first row and ask them to take a card or two and hand them to others, until everyone has a card. I normally am working for audiences of 30-40 people. Then I ask for people to quiz me. They stand, call out the number on their card and I tell them the card. Or they name their card and I tell them the number. I've found that virtually everyone wants a chance with their card(s). At the end, I tell them to keep the card and they can ask me to name the number any time they might see me in the future. Most store the card in their purse or wallet. This has been useful for me. The only lie is that obviously I'm using my memorized deck rather than one I shuffled and marked before the show.
stickmondoo
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I have a Trick I call Higgledy Piggledy C.A.A.N That I enjoy doing. Cards are mixed face up face down then boxed and someone names a Number and you can name the card at that position. It looks pretty impossible thanks to some cool moves I found at the back of S.A.C.T 8. I really like Jazzing with a Mem Deck. Some times you get crazy lucky and can do things that are completely impossible. Some one (my friend Ruth) once named 7 D 2 H and 4 C one after the other in that order. Couldn't believe it. A triple then double, and she turned over the four herself. I was finding it very hard to keep my composure.
stickmondoo
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There's another really good Mem Deck effect you can do. I'll guess your weight by Bob King can be adapted to either full or half stack and after all the dealing and cutting you are back in order. I like tricks like that.
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