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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Penny for your thoughts » » Luke Jermay at Edinburgh Fringe Festival (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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shrink
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Performing is like learning to drive a car.

You have to learn the various levels until they are automatic before moving on to the next. First of all you have to learn the actual mechanics of the effects. Without that you have nothing that's the foundation. Then you have to be aware of your stance and presentation. How you handle the audience. Then some patter, then how to interact. Then you have to look at the structure of your show for maximum impact. Then eventually it hopefully comes together and you can forget everything so you can focus on the audience.

That takes a few years of regular performing plus life experience. And putting your neck on the line. Some people are natural some aren't. Either way its a skill that you have to pay to get. You have to ingnore feedback and advise because its you that's up there. Advice normally comes from those who haven't been through the above process. The only way to understand is to do it.

Working an audience is a knack that comes with doing it. Luke is doing it. At his age five years is a long time. The real question is will there be a market for mentalism over here in five years?
Hypnotic Winter
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Interestingly enough I was doing stage hypnosis for eight years and there wasn't really much call for as much skill with the audience as I have found there is in mentalim, when I started with mentalism there was a temptation to just hypnotise people and be done with it, my skill was in chooseing people who were suggestable rather then handeling those who were not.I still use a little hypnosis but no longer for a laugh.
To me hypnosis got very boreing, mainly because once I had the subjects doing htere thing I didn't have to do a lot aside keeping them getting into trouble.
When your only reality is an illusion, then illusion is reality.
Richard Evans
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I suppose it's unusual for someone become so prominent at such a young age. Particularly with an area such as mentalism - which relies so much on experience of audience management. Using Shrink's analogy, better to learn to drive on the back roads first before hitting the highway! Luke has clearly has got a great deal of experience under his belt, but it all takes time to come together, especially with such an ambitious programme.

Perhaps he's is somewhat unfortunate to be in the glare of publicity in the magic community - where expectations of him are high. Having said that, he chose to do the Edinburgh fringe. Was this too ambitious a step?
I have six locks on my door all in a row. When I go out, I only lock every other one. I figure no matter how long somebody stands there picking the locks, they are always locking three. Elayne Boosler
malini
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"His chair prediction sounds excellent. I think I may "borrow" this."


Kennedy, you twit. You don't just "borrow" other people's routines.

Research all of the many chair predictions around (see Berglas, Maven and a-dozen others) and develop your own original stuff.


-malini.
David Numen
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I don't think it's a case of expectations being too high or even being in the spotlight at such a young age - there are many very successful actors and actresses at that age who can deliver flawless and compelling performances.

I think, simply, that it's the difference between what magicians/mentalists find personally entertaining as opposed to what sells for the lay audience. Luke is an amzing creative talent but he seems to lack performing experience. Time alone will tell if he improves with time and good luck to him.

I must say that on the DVD I found his voice and some of his mannerisms irritating and it's interesting that one lay reviewer described him as irritating so I think he has some work to do.

As for the Edinburgh Fringe being too ambitious - not at all. It's a wonderful opportunity to be crap and not stand out from the crowd. I've been out ofEdinburgh for 4 years now but I'm sure it hasn't changed - for every good show there are another 20 dire ones.

Regards,

David.
Colin
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Malini...I'll need to shake your hand some day.

Kindest regards to you.

Colin Mcleod
Check out Psych-Artist.com now for free essays and other resources.
shrink
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I wouldn't say Luke was crap. When I was there the audience enjoyed the show. Their reactions were good.

I think its a great experience to have done the festival. It can only add to his development. Like I said there were some really nice moments I especially liked his twisted palm.

There was also a problem with hornets in the roof. A few bounced off my head as they were stunned in the dark and with the noise. One went down the back of my shirt but I got it out just in time before I got stung. Luke missed an opportunity to summon a plague I think..
Adam
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Quote:
On 2004-08-21 18:09, taliesin wrote:
To make audience truly believe this, you have to have the gravitas to pull it off. Sometimes this takes something that Luke doesn't have yet...AGE! I just wonder whether somehow his youth makes some of his effects less believable. He's noticeably described in one of the press reports as '19-year-old Luke Jermay'. If this is the case, at least he can be reassured that he'll get there soon enough.

All in my very humble opinion, of course.



Yes, spot on. But don't expect the mini-Derrens on this board who dote on Luke to make any effort to accept this.
David Numen
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I don't think age is that big a factor - for example I started doing psychic readinsg when I was 21 and whenever I did a psychic fair I was usually the busiest reader compared to men and women with tons more experience.

How old was Geller when he made it big?

I know many performers who started bending metal and doing psychic stuff in their teens.

Age is not as important as experience - a 50 year old may not necessarily have the same life experience as a 20 year old, it's all relative.

Regards,

David.
Adam
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That's interesting; it's counterintuitive but I won't argue with the facts. But Luke does neither readings nor metal bending in his act. Presenting yourself as a 'master of psychology' (or the like) does not ring true when you're a teenager, does it?
David Numen
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I believe Luke does indeed do readings in his act. Maybe not in the act you saw but certainly I've heard reports of him using readings when he performed in London.

As for Spoon-bending, it was only an example. Regardless, the issue was about whether Mentalist performers IN GENERAL needed to be older to be believable, and I don't think it's necessarily the case. Cajones are needed quite often, and given what he performs we can take it for granted that he has them!

Does Luke claim to be a Master of Psychology? I hope not as he is certainly far too young to be convincing in that role. I thought he was just some young guy who could do cool stuff and that he doesn't make many claims either way?

Regards,

David.
Adam
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Quote:
Does Luke claim to be a Master of Psychology? I hope not as he is certainly far too young to be convincing in that role. I thought he was just some young guy who could do cool stuff and that he doesn't make many claims either way?



Check out his website (esp. 'biography').
Hypnotic Winter
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Much as I hate it, I do believe that age appearance influences an audience. Banachek made that point in one of his manuscripts about another performer, pointing out that when a young person performs, an older guy wants to come away being able to explain how the performer did his stuff to his girlfriend so he doesn't feel stupid. In other words, the older guy feels intimidated/

On the other hand when the same couple go to see an older performer it feels OK to the guy that an older person should know more than him. While I believe this view can be transcended in such a way as Uri Geller and Banachek did, it still does seem to be a factor, sadly.
When your only reality is an illusion, then illusion is reality.
David Numen
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Quote:
On 2004-08-22 08:05, Adam wrote:
Quote:
Does Luke claim to be a Master of Psychology? I hope not as he is certainly far too young to be convincing in that role. I thought he was just some young guy who could do cool stuff and that he doesn't make many claims either way?



Check out his website (esp. 'biography').


Just read the biography bit. He doesn't exactly say he's a master of psychology. In fact he says he's a student of the human mind which, I think, is appropriate for his age. I think someone of Luke's age can show a lot of cool stuff under that banner.

Regards,

David.
shrink
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I think age is an advantage sometimes because you are more skilled in life in general. Or at least that's the theory not always the case. There are certain processes and skills needed in order to work an audience whether it is mentalism stand up or anything. This takes time and study to master. However too many focus totally on the effects and never graduate much further. Therefore age is a factor.

Dare I say it "Hype" is a skill needed really to work an audience. There seems to be a little neurosis around that word in here at the moment. But anyone who made anything in show business knew how to hype the audience. That is a separate skill from just doing effects. Otherwise you are just doing conjuring tricks.
Adam
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Interspersing words such as 'real power'...'psychological techniques' (repeatedly)...'expert'... all give a certain impression. There's nothing wrong with it at all, as far as I can tell. I'm just suggesting that laymen find this difficult to take seriously (perhaps this accounts for the bad reviews?).

Why wasn't the Oracle in Matrix a teenager? Perhaps there's something about this that tells us what kind of people are seen (amongst the laity) as having 'heightened mental abilities'. I still can't explain Geller, though.
shrink
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Geller is a master of hype.
Richard Evans
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Although Geller was young when he first came to prominence, he was really a one-trick man, i.e., bending silverware. He presented this absolutely straight. He couldn't (and didn't attempt) to explain why he could do these things - it was just some weird natural phenomenon.

He wasn't a 'master' or an expert at anything. It was more like he was inflicted with this 'gift'. There was no high-minded patter about his powers. He basically just described the process of the spoon bending.

I think that's why it worked for him at a young age. It was simple, and he just seemed to be a gifted person. Even now, I don't think most people would consider Geller's ability to be a magic act.
I have six locks on my door all in a row. When I go out, I only lock every other one. I figure no matter how long somebody stands there picking the locks, they are always locking three. Elayne Boosler
shrink
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He played everyone like a fiddle---the media, the scientists. He even used his critics and the controversy to his advantage. He was never a magic act; he was much more than that.
Banachek
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I don't think the reviews mentioned on the site are truly a representation of paying laypeople. It sounded like they were magicians to me. One even mentions Sadowitz, the others also sounded like magicians talking.

Just my two cents.
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