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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » Practice, practice, practice....but how? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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TheCaffeinator
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Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
126 Posts

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Quote:
On 2004-08-30 14:10, JJP161 wrote:
Quote:
On 2004-08-29 19:54, blindbo wrote:
Sure, Joe, I should have anticipated the question.
When I took piano lessons, there were elementary finger exercises I was instructed to do. For instance, lay all four fingers flat, then lift them up or down in different patterns- start with just 1 2 3 4, but then go to 1 3 2 4, eventually do stuff like 3412 etc.,.
Check this out.
Then there is the mechanical approach. I know magicians who swear by this.
Hope that helps.


blindbo,
Thank-you very much I will definitely give all of that a try. I should be able to come up with one of those finger exerciser's fairly easy as my girlfriend has her own country music band. I'll see if her new guitar player has one. I remember years ago seeing a lecture by Meir Yedid and he recommended finger exercises but I don't remember anymore information than that and that he could do so amazing stuff with his hands. Thanks again I will definitely give it a try.

Joe


My hands were at their peak of limberness and strength when I was regularly doing both magic and piano playing. I'd play the piano for two to three hours a day, with the first hour being devoted solely to finger excercises -- specifically, Hannon drills. They're a bit awkward to do without a keyboard, but if you are a pianist and a magician, Jannon drills definitely benefit both.
Jaz
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Inner circle
NJ, U.S.
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If I am learning a new routine or sleight I will practice in front of a mirror until it looks good. I usually have cards nearby and play with these while I'm hanging around the house.

I have a couple of routines I do regularly.
The moves I use for these routines are practiced while I'm watching TV or have time. If I'm going to perform, I will use a mirror and do these routines a few times to check myself.

I don't have a schedule or list but will practice when time permits.
Clifford the Red
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LA, California
1934 Posts

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For closeup moves you can make a multi-view mirror by using 3 mirror tiles and gaffers tape from Home Depot. It will fold-up nicely and set up on your table will give you a nice clear view of your hands from several angles.
"The universe is full of magical things, waiting for our wits to grow sharper." Eden Philpotts
Gerald
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Texas
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Hi Gene,
Glad you got The Ostrich Factor book! I hope it will help you with your quest for excellence.

For further information about The Ostrich Factor, A Practice Guide for Magicians, the link to enter The Ostrich Factor page is on my web site.

After entering, the links will probably answer most of your questions. Please don't hesitate to drop me a PM if you need more information about The Ostrich Factor.

Thanks for the purchase Gene! I wish you well!

Gerald
King Of Pop
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Estonia
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Everything, practice everything, so you become more versatile! Beside all magic moves (like passes, forces, double lifts, shuffles etc.) practice fans, hard deck cuts in one hand (just cut the deck in four different piles in one hand etc.), card throwing, onehand shuffle etc.

The more different things and the more harder moves you practice you`ll soon notice that those easy ones (that used to be difficult in the beginning) are so simple to do:)

How long? That depends on you: how good you wanna become, how fast you wanna achieve your goal, how good you are at the moment, how seriously are you into magic, etc.? So it`s different for every magician:)

Anyway good luck and practice even then when everything seems to be going wrong! don't give up:)

God Bless You, I Love You From The Bottom Of My Heart
God Bless You, I Love You From The Bottom Of My Heart
JJP161
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Columbus, Ohio
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Can anyone offer anymore insight on The Ostrich Factor book, I'm very interested at this point but would like to know a little more about what to expect from this book. Thank-you,

Joe
gene plampin
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Joe,

I just got the book and have looked through it and skimmed part of it. I really like it. The book gives ideas what to do both physically and mentally when you practice. It also gives tips on what can hurt your practice in the long run. Gerald shows you how to practice for all of the elements that will be involved in your routine. I'm glad I got it.

Gene
Gerald
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Hi Gene.
I’m glad you received The Ostrich Factor! I appreciate your kind words. I sincerely hope that it will help to guide you on your way to excellence with your performances.

Don’t hesitate to PM or email me if you have questions about the practice method.

Thanks again. I wish you well.

All the best,

Gerald

____________________________________________
For more information about The Ostrich Factor visit my web site.
poppa
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Austin, Tx.
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I always carry several coins of different sizes in my pocket and at least one sponge ball.

All day everyday while at work or whatever, I'm practicing holding a palmed coin (classic, finger, thumb clip, etc...) while I go about whatever I'm doing...

When I have a few moments idle time I practice various coin or sponge vanashes and palms.

At home I keep a deck of cards nearby and practice sleights while watching tv...

This way you're getting in a lot more useful practice time than you otherwise would.
~Poppa Jim Mitchell
http://www.AVisitWithSanta.com
Bill Palmer
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Eternal Order
Only Jonathan Townsend has more than
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Quote:
On 2004-09-07 20:24, JJP161 wrote:
Can anyone offer anymore insight on The Ostrich Factor book, I'm very interested at this point but would like to know a little more about what to expect from this book. Thank-you,

Joe



Yes. Let's say you are working on a routine. It tells you how to plan the routine so you know what to say, when to say it, how to move, where everything has to be -- basically, how to stage the routine. It also tells you how to work out the patter, how to script it, and what to do when you find weak spots.

It's an excellent book.

Let me add this about practicing. Never learn a sleight or a move, just for the sake of knowing it. Learn it in the context of a routine or a trick. This way, in order to keep the trick in shape, you have to keep the sleight in shape, and vice-versa. Besides, a sleight means NOTHING in and of itself. It is only relevant as a tool. Without a purpose, it has no context and no logic.

Knowing a trick or a routine for the sleight makes it functional.

When I learned the diagonal palm shift, it was for a specific purpose. Once I had learned it, I also worked out three other ways of doing it, and several items that were based upon it.
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Magnus Eisengrim
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Bill Palmer: "Let me add this about practicing. Never learn a sleight or a move, just for the sake of knowing it. Learn it in the context of a routine or a trick. This way, in order to keep the trick in shape, you have to keep the sleight in shape, and vice-versa. Besides, a sleight means NOTHING in and of itself. It is only relevant as a tool. Without a purpose, it has no context and no logic."

Do you feel the same way about flourishes? Do you think they should be practiced in the context of a routine?

John
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
Lee Darrow
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Now on this one, I have to disagree with my esteemed colleague (and fellow Rennie worker) Professor Palmer. Learning a sleight in seclusion from a specific trick can often be the impetus for new creation in magic. But, I will offer the following caveat for that - one must still be verseed in the basics of the type of magic that the sleight applies to (card sleights, coin moves, etc.) so that one does not necessarily re-invent the wheel (something we all do eventually).

When I first learned the Elmsley Count (four-as-four or Ghost count), I learned it in seculsion (outside of a specific trick) and went on to build a couple of new things that turned out to be minor variations on the material in Emerson & West's "Tricks You Can Count On."

But it spurred me to vreate material that was unique to me - my own handling, presentation, framing and script.

Maybe there is room for both approaches.

Your mileage may vary, of course.

Lee Darrow, C.H.
http://www.leedarrow.com
<BR>"Because NICE Matters!"
Gerald
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Texas
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The complete review by Mike Close in MAGIC magazine and other review excerpts from Genii and MUM of The Ostrich Factor are now available at my web site.

Regards,

Gerald
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