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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » Recommended books for beginners (67 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Douglas.M
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Regarding the whole DVD vs BOOK thing:

People have different learning styles. Some people learn better visually, others learn through tactile/kinethetic, audio/music, mathmatical/logic, interpersonal or combinations of the above stimuli.

I like books because I can just glance to re-read a difficult move breakdown without having to "rewind". On the other hand, to see how a series of moves flow, or to see how the presentation and timing work in practice, a video clip is great.

For the interpersonal learner, taking magic lessons or or finding a magic mentor (or Master) would probably be good ideas as they all involve interacting with another human one-on-one. who hasn't benefited from a jam with other magicians?

I recently obtained the "e-book" versions of Card College I and II. The e-books containg text and illustrations for move breakdowns, and also contain links to video clips of the author performing key moves (some in slow motion). To me this combination of text, graphics, and video is a good combination for teaching to "multiple intelligences".

Douglas M.
0045
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I started some time ago with The Royal Road To Card Magic and have never regretted it, I have already learned some super cool sleights and tricks. I also supplement this with an occasional purchase from Ammars' Easy To Master Card Miracles series and have also ordered Kaufmans Basic Card Technique DVD.

The Royal Road is as good an introduction to card magic as you will find anywhere else and will definately give you a thorough grounding in this art form. If you are truly dedicated and wish to become proficient you must be prepared to start at the beginning and practice, practice and practice some more. Study each chapter in sequence and do not move on to the next until you can do the moves in your sleep. Some of the more complex seeming moves become relatively simple if you practice often enough, you will develop your own subtleties and patience will be rewarded. There are no short cuts to good card magic, I thoroughly recommend this classic book to all aspiring card magicians.

Regards 0045
joshua the magician
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Is there a difference between the two books mark wilsons complete course in magic and mark wilsons course in magic (i think the book without the complete in it is a bit older too)
magicly,
joshua
Foucault
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Later versions of the book have an extra "Reputation Makers" section with some really great tricks. I have a copy like this with "Complete" in the title, dated 2002.
michaangelo
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Just weighing in with my .02 worth on the DVD vs. Book argument. I love both and actually would suggest attending a lecture or magic conference if you ever get the chance. I was fortunate to attend the Las Vegas Magic Invitational four years ago and discovered the most amazing community in the world. Magicians are all about helping teach and mentor young and learning magicians (after all, a novice who tips the method damages us all!!!) Working with a person really takes your magic to a new level and it is AWESOME. Join a circle or club and get connected. I lived in a little tiny town a couple of years ago and figured I would never find magic. I was doing a trick for friends at the bowling alley and this old guy came up to me afterward and told me I needed to watch my angles. Suddenly, I was connected with a circle of twelve magicians who totally helped me out... Hang out in the Magic Shop (if there is one near you.) People beat books and DVDs.

Michael
yiquanken
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Quote:
On 2001-09-25 16:01, Scott F. Guinn wrote:
My list of required books for the budding magician:

Amateur Magician’s Handbook-Hay

Royal Road to Card Magic-Hugard & Braue

New Modern Coin Magic-Bobo

The Magic Book-Lorayne

Close up Card Magic-Lorayne

Stars of Magic

Mark Wilson’s Complete Course



After these, get Tarbell, Greater Magic, and Card College. Follow with Ortiz’ Strong Magic and the Tamariz Trilogy, and you’ll have all you need to make a living in magic!



What is the difference between "Modern Coin Magic by J.B. Bobo" and "New Modern Coin Magic-Bobo"? Please give me some advise or review, thanks in advance.
airship
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"Modern Coin Magic" is an older edition, and is published by Dover at the low, low price of $10. "New Modern Coin Magic" is the latest edition, and includes several additional chapters. It's from Magic, Inc., and costs about $30-$40. If you can afford it, get the newer version. If you're really money-tight, the older, cheaper edition is okay. Either way, you should have one or the other in your magic libarary.
'The central secret of conjuring is a manipulation of interest.' - Henry Hay
todsky
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Misty Lee, I also read Nathaniel Schiffman's 'Abracadabra': it's a very good book for those who want to understand pretty much all the underlying principles of magical deception.
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magicbean
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Maybe, I missed this post but did anyone mention Expert Card Technique by Hugard and Braue? This is an all time classic of card magic.

How about Magic and Showmanship by Henning Nelms (Dover)?

I believe these are still published by Dover publications in paperback form. I owned Expert Card Technique in hard cover many years ago and lost it(ouch).
SteveTheMagician
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Ok, I don't know if this was posted yet but I would reccomendthe dvd "Basic" by Richard Kaufman. personally I find that books are great, but to truly learn the essential skills nessicary (sp? lol) to become a magician you have to learn them either in person or on a tape/dvd.

when I was starting out I learned almost all my tricks and skills from the boob tube.
and I found it much easier.

-steve!
Thomas Okey
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My 2cents on VHS/DVD verses Books.

I also started off with books because it was the only think we had so I am probably partial to them but I feel they have their advantages. As already mentioned books usually have more detail about performing the move or presentation ideas. But I also agree that some of the books can be really hard to read or understand. For instance, "The Amature Magicians Handbook." This was my first book also and I still have it and I love it, now that I have learnt to read it. I remember when I was a teenager me and a friend spent four hours trying to understand how to do a waterfall shuffle. When we figured out what we were suppose to be doing, we realized that it was the same shuffle that we had been doing for years. We did get a big laugh out of it though.

DVDs/VHS or great for seeing how a move is suppose to look like or how a routine is suppose to flow. But a big disadvantage in MHO is listening to the presentation. I thing you should use both but turn the volume down on any presentations so that you aren't influenced on the presentation you might use. It is hard not to copy other magicians presentations sometimes but if you don't listen to it you can still learn from watching. I am talking about presentations here not the explanations of how a sleight is performed.

Just my 2cents worth. I hope it helps.

Tom
Mark Wilden
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I just wanted to weigh in on the advice to thoroughly learn each move in "Royal Road" before moving on to the next one.

I started out with that goal in mind - and ended up spending two months on the first chapter and "Topsy Turvy Cards." Even after that amount of time, I still fumbled sometimes with overhand shuffle controls, and when I finally performed "Topsy Turvy Cards" for someone, it fell rather flat (I know - my performance was lacking).

So now I'm going through the book at a quicker pace, learning each move and each trick, but not necessarily perfecting them. This has let me discover tricks that better suit my personality, and moves that I can learn more easily (I still see pros fumble the overhand shuffle in DVDs!).

Obviously, to perform a trick properly, you still need to be able to do it "in your sleep." I'm just saying that, for me, that wasn't necessary for me to progress through and have fun with the book.

///ark
0045
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Mark

I totally respect your opinion and your prefered way of learning, however as your post seems to refer to my earlier submission I wish to add the following;

I agree that some of the effects in the book are not really that impressive, I did not advocate learning every effect until you could do it in your sleep but rather learn every move/slieght.

As you progress through I am sure that you have noticed that there are some truly impressive effects to be learned, these are the ones that you should concentrate on, but not until you have really mastered the necessary sleights.

I hope you have as much fun with this book as I am having.

Regards

0045
Paul Budd
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Lots of great advice contained here......thanks to all of you.....while I'm not "brand new", I've been away from magic for a long time.
His face isn't really this long in-person!
___________________________________________
Once Upon A Magician blog
thefire
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Quote:
On 2001-09-13 03:05, Doug Byrd wrote:
Steve,

I’d like to 2nd the Mark Wilson Complete Course in Magic Book. I have had my copy for 14 years and still reference it to this very day. Top of the list. If you decide you want to be a card man then I’d go with the 4 Roberto Giobbi Card College Volumes. If it’s Coin Work your looking to perfect then J.B. Bobo’s Mordern Coin Magic Book.

Just my 2 drakma worth,

Doug Smile

also with the tech these days dvd is an excellent way to learn some have their preferences but daryl is the best THE BEST teacher at cards
thefire
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Quote:
On 2006-08-19 09:53, jayhoward wrote:
I don't know if anyone has mentioned this, as the topic is quite lengthy, but magic is as much about presentation as it is the techniques or sleights. I feel Ortiz's "Strong Magic" should be required reading for anyone who wants to know about the performance end, which is really what awes spectators, as opposed to just the technical end.

Jay
this book is #1 great
thefire
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Quote:
On 2006-07-15 18:37, djrdjr wrote:
I feel it depends on what works for the individual. When I was trying to learn to juggle, I had a juggler standing next to me, teaching me how to do it. I could not pick it up. But when I read the instructions printed on a cheap set of juggling balls, I picked it up almost immediately. For some people the printed word just works better. For others, DVDs or personal instruction will work better. It's going to be difficult for anyone to guess what will work best for anyone else. Experiment a little. Smile
dvds are great for teaching technique but you can t beat books for
inspiration
DStachowiak
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With 6 pages of posts, I may have missed it, but I would certainly include the trilogy by Dariel Fitzkee,
Showmanship for Magicians,
The Trick Brain,
and
Magic by Misdirection
Woke up.
Fell out of bed.
Dragged a comb across m' head.
DStachowiak
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Quote:
On 2004-12-10 10:57, onebark wrote:
Nicholas Einhorn's book is fantastic. It has really helped me, as an adult returning to my childhood hobby, to get a taste of the magic art. The photography is superb.

There are simple tricks and routines, but there are several real stunners that I use as a regular part of my show. I think the book has really helped me try out different routines and decide what to purchase and what to pursue more deeply.

Jesse

I agree. When I first saw it I thought "Oh great another Magic Coffee Table Book", but looking through it, I quickly changed my mind. This is really a useful and informative book. I must admit though, that I found it a little disconcerting to see Bobo described as a French magician from the turn of the century!
Woke up.
Fell out of bed.
Dragged a comb across m' head.
todsky
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I just read Magic and Meaning by Burger and Neale, and I really wish I had read this much earlier in my carreer (like at the beginning!). If you want to make your magic meaningful and profound, as opposed to light and fluffy, this book will set you on your path. Especially recommended for the philosophers and mythologists among you.
We carry Murphy's Magic, Ellusionist products, Bizarre Magick, etc.
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