The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » When a beginner meets an advanced magician. (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Jaxon
View Profile
Inner circle
Kalamazoo, Mi.
2537 Posts

Profile of Jaxon
I remember what it's like. When I was fairly new to magic I would go to magic gatherings and feel so intimidated by these magicians who have been practicing for years. Especially those who I knew there work and maybe even owned a trick or book of theirs.

If they would ask me if I'd perform something for them. My reply was usually "Uh ah".. Smile

When I finally got enough courage to do something for them I discovered something. I found out that if I did the trick well. It didn't matter if it was an original trick. It didn't matter if they knew how I did it and it didn't matter if it needed a little work.

Actually, the best moments I can remember of this kind of thing happening is when I did something that needed a little work and they nicely told me what I'd need to work on. They often showed me the right way. Even going as far as sitting there with me and walking me through it.

The last time I felt this feeling was at Abbotts Get together. Someone asked if I could do my coin routine for some people. I said sure so I followed him. There are the table was BlackStone, Jr. Jay Marshall, Bret Danields, Abb Dickinson and Karrel Fox. I was like, "Why didn't yon tell me?!!!" Smile It went over great thought and we ended up talking for about a half hour about the routine.

If you are fairly new to magic and you are in a situation where you are performing for magicians. Have fun and do your best. Just don't worry about fooling them. They'll be impressed at your effort. you might even do something they've never seen before. We all learn from different sources so you just never know.

I just thought I'd bring this up. Try not to be intimidated. Admiring someone for a reason is great but remember, they still like magic too or they wouldn't be doing it.

Ron Jaxon
Image


After regaining my ability to hear after 20 years of deafness. I learned that there is magic all around you. The simplest sounds that amazed me you probably ignore. Look and listen around you right now. You'll find something you didn't notice before.
BerkleyJL
View Profile
Veteran user
Chicago, IL
397 Posts

Profile of BerkleyJL
That's great advice. So, when would you like to see my act? Smile
I need a stage name.

Joe Berkley
SOHartist
View Profile
Loyal user
Ft. Myers, Florida
211 Posts

Profile of SOHartist
Great post. I always feel that way when I perform for some "better" magician. Thanks for sharing.

Michael
sugam
View Profile
Regular user
Toronto, Canada
175 Posts

Profile of sugam
Thanks for the encouragement Ron. I know that as I become more immersed in magic and meet great magicians in the future, this'll probably come up.
Peter Marucci
View Profile
Inner circle
5389 Posts

Profile of Peter Marucci
If your a beginner and you are performing for an advanced magician, one of two things will happen:

1: He or she will watch attentively, then encourage you, then -- very probably -- offer advice baed on years of experience. He or she remembers what it is like and that person is worth listening to.

2: He or she will dismiss your efforts, probably without even watching them, forgetting that every single one of us was in the same position at one time. He or she is an idiot and not worth listening to.
Jon
View Profile
New user
Israel
64 Posts

Profile of Jon
Oh Jaxon, I was in a situation like this only a few weeks ago (at my first magic convention).
it's as if you are writing directly to me.
I agree with your post.

Jonathan.
BerkleyJL
View Profile
Veteran user
Chicago, IL
397 Posts

Profile of BerkleyJL
Quote:
On 2004-12-18 07:57, Peter Marucci wrote:
If your a beginner and you are performing for an advanced magician, one of two things will happen:

1: He or she will watch attentively, then encourage you, then -- very probably -- offer advice baed on years of experience. He or she remembers what it is like and that person is worth listening to.

2: He or she will dismiss your efforts, probably without even watching them, forgetting that every single one of us was in the same position at one time. He or she is an idiot and not worth listening to.


Peter,

Most of the advanced magicians I know are like number 1 and a great deal of fun to spend time with. However, we have a member like number 2 (interesting choice of words) in one of my clubs. He is on the verge of being asked to leave due to his attitude. Do you have any advice on how to influence him to be less of an @%!&@! ?

The worst part is, he's not really an advanced magician. He's a great mimic. In addition to not wanting to help the newer magicians, his entire act is a ripoff of another club member.
I need a stage name.

Joe Berkley
tony4938
View Profile
New user
Stafford, UK
94 Posts

Profile of tony4938
This is great advice, if only I could find an advanced magician in my area to watch and critique me!
Peter Marucci
View Profile
Inner circle
5389 Posts

Profile of Peter Marucci
BerkleyJL writes: "Do you have any advice on how to influence him to be less of an @%!&@!"

First, he has to realize that he is the problem, not an easy thing to do; then it's up to him to act on it.
So I guess the answer is "no, I don't!" Sorry! 8-(
Dave V
View Profile
Inner circle
Las Vegas, NV
4825 Posts

Profile of Dave V
I was at a magic convention years ago, sitting with some old friends and a few new ones. We were swapping tricks, and after I was done with one, the man sitting next to me said "I'll be right back, they're calling for me" as the M.C. announced the guest of the evening, Lennart Green.
No trees were killed in the making of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.
zur
View Profile
Special user
California
671 Posts

Profile of zur
I still get nervous when I perform at ring meetings. Somehow I feel that everything I do is exposed, especially card sleights. Its an uncomfortable feeling, but with time and more material, its become much better.
Corey Harris
View Profile
Inner circle
Kansas City, MO
1229 Posts

Profile of Corey Harris
When ever I go to the magic shop here in KC, Mo, The store manager always asks to see what I have been working on and to see my pass. I get so nervous its not even funny. He is always a help though. I need to Join the local ring here so I can meet and learn from the other magicians around here.
rikbrooks
View Profile
Inner circle
Olive Branch, Mississippi
1317 Posts

Profile of rikbrooks
I've found a way to perform for better magicians. I bought a digital camcorder at Target for about $100. Then I post the films on my web site and ask other magician's to critique them.

Actually, I've only done this once so far but I intend on doing it a lot more often. The response that I got from the more advanced magician was absolutely priceless.
Peter Marucci
View Profile
Inner circle
5389 Posts

Profile of Peter Marucci
Zur and Tanker,
The whole purpose of magic clubs and, to a great extent, magic dealers, is to give aspiring magicians a place to try out their material in front of a sympathetic audience, which will not be overly critical and expecting perfection.
In other words, the aspiring magician needs a place to be bad.
With practice, as Zur says, it becomes easier.
The better you know your material, and material you will never use, the easier it becomes.
Stanyon
View Profile
Inner circle
Landrum, S.C. by way of Chicago
3407 Posts

Profile of Stanyon
Quote:
On 2004-12-21 08:44, Peter Marucci wrote:
... the aspiring magician needs a place to be bad.


Great phrasing, Peter!

This is what is probably most forgotten by the neophytes. You've got to be bad before you can be good!

Cheers and Happy Holidays! Smile
Stanyon

aka Steve Taylor

"Every move a move!"

"If you've enjoyed my performance half as much as I've enjoyed performing for you, then you've enjoyed it twice as much as me!"
calexa
View Profile
Inner circle
Germany
1635 Posts

Profile of calexa
Thanks for that advice!

Magixx
Optimists have more fun.....
Frank Tougas
View Profile
Inner circle
Minneapolis, MN
1712 Posts

Profile of Frank Tougas
Yes Peter,

The local magic meeting is akin to the old Catskill resorts where comedians went to be bad and learn their craft. The difference is the real audiences may not have been as kind as our brother magicians.

Myself, I love to perform for a lay audience and if ythere is a magician or two there I play to the audience and put their presence out of mind. When given the option I almost always choose not to perform for other magicians. I find it to be an unrewarding proposition. Some find it very rewarding and stimulating.

For example I have never entered a contest of magic at any convention, be it regional or national. Yet my first foray into the world of national magic contest was as a judge not as an entrant. Yet many a struggling magician has made a name for themselves entering and eventually winning such contests. (quick somebody name a judge...see what I mean?)

This is not to say I have not asked better performers to watch and critique my performance. But I consider this more of a learning than a performing experience.
Frank Tougas The Twin Cities Most "Kid Experienced" Children's Performer :"Creating Positive Memories...One Smile at a Time"
saxmangeoff
View Profile
Veteran user
Moscow, ID, USA
355 Posts

Profile of saxmangeoff
Quote:
On 2004-12-21 12:16, Stanyon wrote:
You've got to be bad before you can be good!


This can be hard to accept, especially when you really really want to be good.

When you think about it, it's true about everything. You used to be really bad at walking. You used to be so bad at talking that only your parents could understand you, and even they weren't sure much of the time.

I read something a while back about kids and learning music. The author had found that kids who had a slightly inflated view of their own abilities ended up being the best musicians. I think that's because, thinking themselves better than they are, they persevere in being bad, and go on to being good. Those who know how bad they really are hold back and never get good.

So, my encouragement to everybody is: Go ahead. Be bad. Be really, really bad. Because that's the only way to get good.

Geoff
"You must practice your material until it becomes boring, then practice it until it becomes beautiful." -- Bill Palmer
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » When a beginner meets an advanced magician. (0 Likes)
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2020 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.25 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL