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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Ever so sleightly » » C&B not ready for Prime Time? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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NMaggio
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Nick Maggio
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Frank's idea of 10 times without a mistake ( at practice sessions ) is my benchmark for initial success with any routine or slight. A good example is a right handed coin roll without dropping 10 times. If's I am able to duplicate my success at random attempts after that, I know the neurons and hand muscles are pretty reliable.

Nick Maggio
KirkG
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While I wouldn't hang my hat on the opinions of some magic club members, I still think there are a few you can count on to help you with the moves. They can spot the obvious flashes.

I had the opportunity to teach the cups and balls to someone last night. I had shown the routine previously and we had gone over the basic tip loading move.

I found this time I was more aware of the details and he was more able to receive them. I did have to get a little testy at one point, because he was doing a move "his way", but he wasn't quite ready to make that determination that it was a better way. After some more time, he got the point I was trying to convey in "my way" and his way changed to mine.

An example of what I mean would be the movement of the fingers when you do a retention vanish. Ithink everybody agrees that there shouldn't be any in the "releasing" hand, but the first time you try the move, you invariably "pull" the coin in with lots of finger movement which telegraphs where the coin is going. Once you realize this cannot happen, you find a way. That is what I meant by the above, "his way, my way."

What really surprised me was the extent that the details existed that I never really think about anymore as they are just internal. It was quite a lesson for me as well.

Kirk g
rikbrooks
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Olive Branch, Mississippi
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I guess I'm compulsive. I absolutely insist on doing it 100 times without Frank's definition of a mistake. I don't insist that I do it for a week that way though. I figure if I can do it a hundred times in a row then I'm ready to rock and roll.

Now, if I flub it in performance then it's back to the 100 times again.

The reason that I chose 100, by the way, is so I can keep an internal count (I'm 75% of the way there, making progress).

Also, I don't do THE WHOLE ROUTINE 100 times in a row. I'll practice each phase. Once I've done a phase 100 times I do the whole routine up to the end of that phase. If I'm happy, especially with the transition from one phase to the next, then it's on to the next phase.
Alan Munro
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Kentwood, Michigan, USA
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I've found that frustration can undo what is learned about an effect or routine. The trick is to know when to give it a rest and when to come back to it. It's a gut feeling that takes time to sense.

Another thing that take experience, is knowing when you've learned as much as you can without an audience. When that moment occurs, you have to get it in front of an audience to take it further.
NMaggio
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Nick Maggio
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Alan -

Truer words were never said. Saturation is a real issue. In my learning curve, a stretgic break for a few weeks works wonders for my confidence. My fear while practicing is that I will atrophy and forget all of what I have learned. By picking up after a rest, you get to understand just how much you have retained. The weak areas then become more evident and can be enhanced with additional work.

Nick Maggio
BlackShadow
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How long is a piece of string? You may need time to perfect certain sleights but asuming you have those you'll still need several months make the thing flow together. Probably 100's of runs. If you could practice the complete routine 3 times a day every day that's still only 90 times in one month. I also videotape my practice rather than just watching in a mirror. You can spot angles/flashes you'd have never considered.
NMaggio
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Nick Maggio
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BlackShadow -

"The unblinking eye" is also a highly critical audience. When you view your practice on tape, your harshest critic is yourself. You make pick up details that the average audience are likely to miss, assuming they are all major embarrasments and correcting them is taking a step toward excelllence.

Nick Maggio
Pete Biro
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1933 - 2018
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One of the keys to success, is, if you make a mistake, just keep on dancin' -- act like nothing has happened. If the fourth ball accidentally shows up, just vanish it and keep going.
STAY TOONED... @ www.pete-biro.com
Bill Palmer
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Absolutely. Look what Gazzo does on his tape when that kind of thing happens.
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
steve j
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I'm no expert on the cups and balls, however I found that watching video of yourself and performing for people are two different things, when you look at yourself you know what your looking for, laymen have no idea that and misdirection is another factor, if you can misdirect well then you should no problem with the routine, I used to think that I wasnt up to par to perform them until I tried and I floored them with my final loads, so don't think that your routine is that bad, only audience testing it will tell you for sure
BlackShadow
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True Steve. Performing for an audience is the true acid test, but the video is good for getting the technical bits as right as you can. Especially if you video some performances from a wide angle. Most laymen may be misdirected but if you flash a load really badly from a certain angle a fair few may see it. And though the reception may be good, it doesn't help if they talk afterwards and are saying "Yes it was nice but I saw him do xyz"
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